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when he stood for and carried the not only did he frame petitions and ad- of yeai's were carried into effect. This Regius Professorship, neither a Bachelor dresses; not only did he deliver speeches is ludicrous enough in P. P. Clerk of nor Doctor of Divinity, which he says, in the House and stir in elections; but the Parish, “and as I said, lo! so diel “ puzzled me for a moment: I had even his discesan charges and episcopal | they;" but in such a man as the Bishop only seven days to transact the business functions were tinged with party poli- of Landaff it is literally astonishing. in; but by hard travelling, and sometics, and man, peer, and bishop, were

We could not, credit it upon any auadroitness, I accomplished my pur- ) alike whig—whig. Had we not most thority but his own; the authority of pose, obtained the king's mandate for distinctly stated our sentiments in re- the most unlimited egotism that was a doctor's degree, and was created a viewing a tory-sermon, that of Mr. ever linked to sterling and exalted doctor on the day previous to that ap- Bates at St. Paul's (Literary Gazette, powers of mind. pointed for the examination of the can- page 310) we should refrain on this This overweening foible breaks out didates."

occasion from declaring low inuch we on every instance. The late Mr. CumThough Dr. Watson's diligence soon disapprove of mingling politics with berland wrote a pamphlet in answer to made him an accomplished chemist, it religion; the wrangling of men with the a publication of Dr. Watson's (Letter is a no less remarkable trait of Cam- worship of God. In this respect the to the Archbishop of Canterbury), of bridge characteristics to elect a man to spiritual merged in the temporal with which he says :instruct others in a science of which he Dr. W. and he paints himself rather as “ But he knew nothingof the subject, and himself was utterly ignorant; of the the sturdy citizen, obstinate and dispu- misrepresented my design. He laid himself divinity appointment we say nothing, tatious for his rights, than as the meek so open in every page of his performance, as our author seems only to regret that churchman, not neglectful of his pri- him, I should have made him sick of writing

that, could I have condescended to answer he was not a good prosodian, and we vileges as a Briton, but holding even

pamphlets for the rest of his life.” take it for granted he had no other de- these secondary to his holier offices as

This was in 1782; but in proof how ficiencies, to render him ineligible for a Christian teacher, whose views ex. that important station.

tended beyond this sphere, and all its sore Cumberland's viespised pamphlets His constitution" (we have said petty passions, and whose paramount noticed with signal dispieasure, and

made him, we have them frequently it was ardent) being, as he informs us, duty to his brethren it was to

cven in 1806 they are not forgolten. page 44, “ ill fitted for celibacy,"

“ Allure to brighter worlds, and lead the way." Dr. W. thought it better to marry than

In a letter to Nir. Ilayley of 14th Jure,

in the latter year, he says, burn, and on the 21st of December Dr. Horsley called Dr. Hvadley 1773 espouscd, at Lancaster, Niss republican bishop :" a great reproach; “ You have cut up Cumberland wiih Wilson, the eldest daughter of Edward for unless a bishop meildled more with skill, without dirtying yourself by the nasty Wilson, Esg. of Dallum Tower, l'est- such things than became his situation, I have no curiosity to know, as I am certain

operation. What he may have said of me, moreland, and the day after set out to he would not be liable even to a false that I shall never be at the irouble of either take possession of a sinccnre rectory imputation of this kinil. Dr. Watson correcting his misapprehensions, or refuting in North Wales, procured for him by disclaims being a republican, but his malignity. I am aware that many years the Duke of Grafton, which he after. loudly asserts bis being a reformier, a ago, he wrote two pamphlets against me, or wards exchanged for a prebend in the lover of the revolution, a Liberal, and rather against my political principles; for church of Ely. In July, 1982, he a hearty whing.

I had no personal acquaintance with him,

and therefore could not hare offended him. was, through the Duke of Rutland's The late Mr. Luther, M. P. for Essex, On reading one of these two productions, I interest, promoted to the bishoprie or having in 1761 quarrelled with and sat down to answer it; bu'l soon found Landaff by Lord Shelburne, who at that separated from his wife, Dr. Watson that I was heating myself with cudgelling a period succeeded to the administration, lastenced to Paris after his friend, and dwarf, and, distaining such a miserable ocvacant by the death of Lord Rocking succeeded in bringing about a recon- cupation, I threw my weapons into the fire, ham. This was the top of his prefer- ciliation. This was afterwards remem

and left him to sleep in peace:"ment, and as richer bishopricks passed bered in Hr. Luther's l!ill, by which This is a sinister compliment to Mr. away from his ambition, and were given the bishop wils enriched to the amount Ilayley, who is copinenced as a dexte. to other, younger, and probably less of 20,0001. In disgust with the un- rous combutiuit in cutting up his equal learned competitors, le soured and be availing pursuit of higher dignities, the duarf: But Dr. Watson is never came discontented; blamel by turns upou this sum, and be limited revenues prone to put any person's titlents in the King, the Queen, Mr. l'itt, Lord of Landaff, Dr. \1. applied himself to competition with his own. All those Grenville, or whoever was minister at agriculture, and was very successful in who arguc against hijnt are mere ilimsy the time, for overlooking his transcen- thic cultivation of trees, and other ex- Lilliputians, and he is the very Gulliver dent merit, and bestowing their fa pcriments on a considerable suale, by of politics and literature. Paley is tolervours on more pliant divines, and which he added handsomely to his in- abiy clever, but his ethics and politics more subservient partizans, whom they come. Hle again and again protests only so-so; Air. Pitt a man of a 's little pretend to choose for their orthodoxy that he has relinquished politics; but and revengeful miod,” (page 238); and agreement in principles.

still on every occasion we find bin Lord Eldon (who neglected to answer Fretted, but not subdued, Dr. Watson volunteering udvice to the ministers, one of the Bishop's letters) of very took an active part in the politics of and either piqued at the little attention limited capacity; Dr. Cornwallis, Archthe day; too active, as we think, for a sometimes paid to his snggestions, or bishop of Canterbury, (guilty of the dignitary of the church. Not only did taking to himself great praise for hav- same fault) wife-ridden, and of no he write anonymously in the journals, ing originated in this way micasures of abilities ; and, in short, every being, and utter pamphlets from the press ; much consequence, which in the course who either oppo:od, or slighted, or dif

a

fered from the infallible Bishop of Lan- | Narrative of my Captivity in Japan, 1 fifty of these sorely oppressed people, daff, were ignorant, or venal, or weak.

during the years 1811, 1812,

and It is to be confessed, however, that he

whose bodies are entirely covered with 1813; with Observations on the Country

short hairs, and whom their Japanese is not invariably consistent in these

and the People. By Captain Golow- conquerors use like the beasts, which, opinions. It was immediately after

NIN, R.N. 2 vols. 8vo. &c. &c. in this covering, they resemble. From the Bishoprick of Durham was dis

this island they sailed to the eastern posed of, contrary to his application to Of Japan so little is truly known, that coast of Ooroop, and encountering Mr. Pitt, that the latter is spoken of in nothing can be published respecting contrary winds for some time, on the illiberal manner we have quoted: that Empire which is not interesting the 4th of July they reached the elsewhere (page 429) the Bishop says, This work is eminently so; for to the Straits between Matsmai and Kimas"I always had a regard for him,” and abundant notices it contains of Japan- chier, into the harbour of the latter “I knew that his talents and disinterese laws, manners, and customs, it of which they entered on the following estedness merited my esteem, and that joins the most affecting narrative of the morning. It would extend this sketch of every impartial man!!"

adventures and sufferings of the author far beyond the limits we prescribe for Similar inconsistency appears on and his companions in captivity, than it, were we to enter into a detail of all many of the subjects which are broach- which romance of real life, no story the transactions which ensued between ed in these anecdotes. Neither on the ever coined by the brain, can lay a Captain Golownin and the Japanese. Catholic question, on the Irish Union, more irresistible hold on the attention Suffice it to say, that he, with two on the French Revolution, nor on and feelings of the reader. The East- officers, (Mr. Moor, a midshipman, other important topics, is there that ern colouring of the scenery, and cha- and Mr. Chlebnikoff, a pilot,) four uniformity of sentiment which we ex- racteristics of the actors greatly en- sailors, and a Russian Kurile named pected from so able a reasoner. But the hance the novelty and charm of this Alexei, in all eight persons, were enticed truth is, that with all Dr. W.'s boasts eventful history; and the air of fiction on shore to a conference, surrounded of sturdy independence, it is clear that which belongs to the extraordinary by armed men, seized, tied with ropes, his passions operated strongly at differ- circumstances of which it is composed and marched prisoners up the country. ent periods, as he hoped for, or was is advantageously contrasted with its The senior officer on board the Diana, disappointed in promotion, in affecting truth, carrying conviction with every Lieut. Ricord, could do nothing to rehis views of men and things. Though particular, and with the simplicity of a lieve his companions, thus treacherhe tells us, indecorously enough, relation at once extraordinary and un- ously entrapped, and returned to Okotzk "I had not the usual prudence, shall I call questionable.

to devise with the Russian governor it, or selfish caution, of my profession, at It appears that the Emperor of the means for their deliverance. Meanany time of life. Ortus 4, quercu non a Russia attempted to open a commercial while, bound in the eruelest manner, salice, I knew not how to lend my prin intercourse with Japan, in 1803, through with cords round their breasts and necks, ciples to the circumstances of the times."

the negotiation of the Chamberlain their elbows almost constrained to We do not observe that he missed Resanoff

, which ended in a prohibition touch, and their hands firmly manacled many opportunities of urging his claim from that jealous government, förbid together, from all which fastenings a to vacant Sces, Durham, Carlisle, Ches- ding all Russian vessels to approach the string, held by a Japanese keeper, proter, Bangor, or Canterbury; and in a coasts of Japan. Resanoff afterwards ceeded, who could in an instant tighten man whose ' profession' was the gospel sailed to America in one of the Ameri- the nooses to helplessness or stranguministry, we hold the above inuendo tocan Company's ships, commanded by lation, these unfortunate men were be as illiberal as it is unjust. The Lieut. Chwostoff, and died soon after marched for fifty days, till they reached present Bench of Bishops, many of his return to Okotzk. This Chwostoff a prison at a city called Chakodale. whom have risen over Dr. Watson and seems to have been a bad subject: he Thence, after being confined some time, provoked his spleen, affords as eminent sailed again, and without provocation they were transported to Matsmai, examples of worth, learning, and piety, attacked and plundered several Japan- where they were literally imprisoned in as ever graced the annals of the Pro- ese villages on the coasts of the Kurile large cages. Here they underwent testant Church, and such a speer Islands, thus widening the misunder- daily and protracted examinations of only recoils with discredit on the head standing which already existed between the strangest nature ; but their treatof its author.

the countries. Of this breach Captain ment became gradually ameliorated : We cannot see without pain the Golownin was the unfortunate victim. their food was better, they were rename of a person so respectable in Having received orders to visit the moved under a guard to a house, and other points, connected not only with southern Kurile Islands, some of which were frequently allowed to walk for such imputations as this, but with vul- are in the possession of the Japanese, exercise and hcalth. Despairing of gar insinuations respecting our revered he sailed in the Diana sloop, and on being restored to their country, on the Monarch, his exemplary Queen, and the 17th of June, 1817, arrived off the 20th of April an attempt at escape was much that is venerable both in indi- northern extremity of Eetoorpoo, where made by all but Moor and Alexei

. viduals and Institutions. It is reported some cominunication took place with The fugitives underwent incredible that the editor (the Rev. Richard Wat- the inhabitants, who induced the Rus- hardships, and after ten days wandering son) has blotted a great deal: does sians to sail for Oorbeetsh, under the were retaken, and carried back to their he not now wish that he had blotted hope of obtaining water and provisions. cages. They received, however, no more, and not have afforded so much At Eetoorpoo they saw a toian, or chief, further ill-treatment: and the conduct matter for prurient faction to quote of that singular aboriginal race of these of the government of Japan is painted, and revel in ?

islands, the Hairy Kuriles, and about in all the prior and subsequent pro(To be continued.)

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when he stood for and carried the not only did he frame petitions and ad- of years were carried into effect.

This Regius Professorship, neither a Bachelor dresses; not only did he deliver speeches is ludicrous enough in P. P. Clerk of nor Doctor of Divinity, which he says, in the House and stir in elections ; but the Parish, “and as I said, lo! so did “ puzzled me for a moment: I had even his divcesan charges and episcopal they;" but in such a man as the Bishop only seven days to transact the business functions were tinged with party poli- of Landaff it is literally astonishing. in; but by hard travelling, and some tic3, and man, peer, and bishop, were

We could not. credit it upon any auadroitness, I accomplished my pur-alike whig—whig. Had we not most thority but his own; the authority of pose, obtained the king's mandate for distinctly stated our sentiments in rc- the most unlimited egotism that was a doctor's degree, and was created a viewing a tory-serinon, that of Mr. ever linked to sterling and exalted doctor on the day previous to that ap- Bates at St. Paul's (Literary Gazette, powers of mind. pointed for the examination of the can- page 310) we should refrain on this This overweening foible breaks out didates."

occasion from declaring how much we on every instance. The late Mr. CumThough Dr. Watson's diligence soon disapprove of mingling politics with berland wrote a pamphlet in answer to made him an accomplished chemist, it religion; the wrangling of men with the a publication of Dr. Watson's (Letter is a no less remarkable trait of Cam- worship of God. In this respect the to the Archbishop of Canterbury), of bridge characteristics to elect a man to spiritual merged in the temporal with which he says: instruct others in a science of which he Dr. W. and he paints himself rather as “But he knew nothingof the subject, and himself was utterly ignorant; of the the sturdy citizen, obstinate and dispu- misrepresented my design. He laid himself divinity appointment we say nothing, tatious for his rights, than as the meek so open in every page of his performance, as our author seems only to regret that churchman, not neglectful of his pri- that, could I have condescended to answer he was not a good prosodian, and we vileges as a Briton, but holding even him, I should have made him sick of writing

pamphlets for the rest of his life.” take it for granted he had no other de- these secondary to his holier offices as ficiencies, to render him ineligible for a Christian teacher, whose views ex.

This was in 1782; but in proof how that important station.

tended beyond this sphere, and all its sore Cumberland's despised pamphlets His constitution" (we have said petty passions, and whose paramount noticed with signal displeasure, and it was ardent) being, as he informs us, duty to his brethren it was to page 44, “ill fitted for celibacy,"

even in 1806 they are not forgotten. “ Allure to brighter worlds, and lead the way." Dr. W. thought it better to marry than

In a letter to Nir. Ilayley of 14th June,

in the latter year, he says, burn, and on the 21st of December | Dr. Horsley called Dr. Hoadley 1773 espouscd, at Lancaster, Miss republican bishop :" a great reproach;

You have cut up Cumberland wih Wilson, the eldest daughter of Edward for unless a bishop meildled more with skill, without dirtying yourself by the nasty Wilson, Esq. of Dalluin Tower, West- such things than became his situation, I have no curiosity to know, as I am certain

operation. What he may have said of me, moreland, and the day after set out to he would not be liable even to a false that I shall nerer İve at the trouble of either take possession of a sinceure rectory imputation of this kind. Dr. Watson correcting his misapprehensions, or refuting in North Wales, procured for him by disclaims being a republican, but his malignity. I am aware that many years the Duke of Grafton, which he after- loudly asserts his being a reformer, a ago, he wrote two pamphlets against me, or wards exchanged for a preland in the lover of the revolution, a Liberal, ind rather against my political principles; for church of Ely. In July, 1759, he a hearty whisk.

I hail 10 personal acquaintance with him, was, through the Duke of Ruthund's The late Mr. Luther, 11. P. for Essex: On reading one of these two productions, I

and therefore could not hare offended him. interest, promoted to the bishopric of having in 1761 quarrelled with and sat down to answer it: bui'I soon found Landaff by Lord Shelburne, who at that separated from his wife, Dr. Watson that I was heating myself with cudgelling a period succeeded to the administration, bustencd to Paris after his friend, and dwart, and, disdaining such a miserable ocvacant by the death of Lord Roching. succeeded in bringing about il recon- cupation, I threw my weapons into the fire, han, This was the top of his prefer. ciliation. This was afterwards remem

and left him to sleep in peace:"ment, and as richer bishopricks passed berel in Mr. Luther's ll'ill, by which This is a sinister compliment to Mr. away from his ambition, and were given the bisliop was enriched to the amount Ilayley, uho is cominenced as a dexte. to other, younger, and probably less of 20,0001. In disgust with the m- vous coinbataunt in culing up his equal learned competitors, he soured and be availing pursuit of higher dignities, the duarf: Bul Dr. Watson is never came discontented; blamed by turns upon this sum, and be limited revenues prone to put any person's talents in the King, the Queen, Mr. l'itt, Lord of Landaff, Dr. W. applied himself to competition with his own. All those Grenville, or whoever was minister at agriculture, and was very succe-sful in who argue against him are mere ilimsy the time, for overlooking his transcen- the cultivation of trees, and other ex Lilliputians, and he is the very Gulliver dent merit, anu bestowing their fa. periments on a considerable scale, by of politics and literature. Paley is tolervours on nwre pliant divines, and which he added handsovely to liis in- abiy clever, but his ethics and politics more subservient partizans, whom they come. He again and again protests only so-so ; Mr. Pilt a man of a " little pretend to choose for their orthodoxy that he has relinquished politics; but and revengeful mind,” (page 238); and agreement in principles.

still on every occasion we find him Lord Eldon (who neglected to answer Fretted, but not subdued, Dr. Watson volunteering advice to the ministers, one of the Bishop's letters) of very took an active part in the politics of and either piqued at the little attention limited capacity; Dr. Cornwallis, Archthe day; too active, as we think, for a sometimes paid to his snggestions, or bishop of Canterbury, (guilty of the dignitary of the church. Not only did taking to himself great praise for hav- same fault) wife-ridden, and of no he write anonymously in the journals, ing originated in this way micasures of abilities ; and, in short, every being, and utter pamphlets from the press; much consequence, which in the course who either oppo cd, or slighted, or dif

a

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fered from the infallible Bishop of Lan- | Narrative of my Captivity in Japan, fifty of these sorely oppressed people, daff, were ignorant, or venal, or weak.

during the years 1811, 1812, and It is to be confessed, however, that he

whose bodies are entirely covered with 1813; with Observations on the Country

short hairs, and whom their Japanese is not invariably consistent in these, opinions. It was immediately after

and the People. By CAPTAIN Golow-conquerors use like the beasts, which, R.N. 2 vols. 8vo. &c. &c.

in this covering, they resemble. From the Bishoprick of Durham was dis

this island they sailed to the eastern posed of, contrary to his application to Or Japan so little is truly known, that coast of Ooroop, and encountering Mr. Pitt, that the latter is spoken of in nothing can be published respecting contrary winds for some time, on the illiberal manner we have quoted: that Empire which is not interesting. the 4th of July they reached the elsewhere (page 429) the Bishop says, This work is eminently so; for to the Straits between Matsmai and Kimas"I always had a regard for him," and abundant notices it contains of Japan- chier, into the harbour of the latter “I knew that his talents and disinter- ese laws, manners, and customs, it of which they entered on the following estedness merited my esteem, and that joins the most affecting narrative of the morning. It would extend this sketch of every impartial man !!"

adventures and sufferings of the author far beyond the limits we prescribe for Similar inconsistency appears on and his companions in captivity, than it, were we to enter into a detail of all many of the subjects which are broach- which romance of real life, no story the transactions which ensued between ed in these anecdotes. · Neither on the ever coined by the brain, can lay a Captain Golownin and the Japanese. Catholic question, on the Irish Union, more irresistible hold on the attention Suffice it to say, that he, with two on the French Revolution, nor on and feelings of the reader. The East- officers, (Mr. Moor, a midshipman, other important topics, is there that ern colouring of the scenery, and cha- and Mr. Chlebnikoff, a pilot,) four uniformity of sentiment which we ex- racteristics of the actors greatly en- sailors, and a Russian Kurile named pected from so able a reasoner. But the hance the novelty and charm of this Alexei, in all eight persons, were enticed truth is, that with all Dr. W.'s boasts eventful history; and the air of fiction on shore to a conference, surrounded of sturdy independence, it is clear that which belongs to the extraordinary by armed men, seized, tied with ropes, his passions operated strongly at differ- circumstances of which it is composed and marched prisoners up the country. ent periods, as he hoped for, or was is advantageously contrasted with its The senior officer on board the Diana, disappointed in promotion, in affecting truth, carrying conviction with every Lieut. Ricord, could do nothing to rehis views of men and things. Though particular, and with the simplicity of a lieve his companions, thus treacherhe tells us, indecorously enough, relation at once extraordinary and un- ously entrapped, and returned to Okotzk “ I had not the usual prudence, shall I call questionable.

to devise with the Russian governor it, or selfish caution, of my profession, at It appears that the Emperor of the means for their deliverance. Meanany time of life. Ortus a quercu non a Russia attempted to open a commercial while, bound in the eruelest manner, salice, I knew not how to lend my prin intercourse with Japan, in 1803, through with cords round their breasts and necks, ciples to the circumstances of the times,”

the negotiation of the Chamberlain their elbows almost constrained to We do not observe that he missed Resanoff, which ended in a prohibition touch, and their hands firmly manacled many opportunities of urging his claim from that jealous government, forbid- together, from all which fastenings a to vacant Sees, Durham, Carlisle, Ches-ding all Russian vessels to approach the string, held by a Japanese keeper, proter, Bangor, or Canterbury; and in a coasts of Japan. Resanoff afterwards ceeded, who could in an instant tighten man whose ' profession' was the gospel sailed to America in one of the Ameri- the nooses to helplessness or stranguministry, we hold the above inuendo to

can Company's ships, commanded by lation, these unfortunate men were be as illiberal as it is unjust. The Lieut. Chwostoff, and died soon after marched for fifty days, till they reached present Bench of Bishops, niany of his return to Okotzk. This Chwostoff a prison at a city called Chakodale. whom have risen over Dr. Watson and seems to have been a bad subject : he Thence, after being confined some time, provoked bis spleen, affords as eminent sailed again, and without provocation they were transported to Matsmai, examples of worth, learning, and piety, attacked and plundered several Japan- where they were literally imprisoned in as ever graced the annals of the Pro- ese villages on the coasts of the Kurile large cages.

Here they underwent testant Church, and such

a sneer Islands, thus widening the misunder- daily and protracted examinations of only recoils with discredit on the head standing which already existed between the strangest nature ; but their treatof its author.

the countries. Of this breach Captain ment became gradually ameliorated : We cannot see without pain the Golownin was the unfortunate victim. their food was better, they were re: name of a person so respectable in Having received orders to visit the moved under a guard to a house, and other points, connected not only with southern Kurile Islands, some of which were frequently allowed to walk for such imputations as this, but with vul are in the possession of the Japanese, exercise and hcalth. Despairing of

, gar insinuations respecting our revered he sailed in the Diana sloop, and on being restored to their country, on the Monarch, his exemplary Queen, and the 17th of June, 1811, arrived off the 20th of April an attempt at escape was much that is venerable both in indi- northern extremity of Eetoorpoo, where made by all but Moor and Alexei. viduals and Institutions. It is reported some cominunication took place with The fugitives underwent

incredible that the editor (the Rev. Richard Wat the inhabitants, who induced the Rus- hardships, and after ten days wandering son) has blotted a great deal: does sians to sail for Oorbeetsh, under the were retaken, and carried back to their he not now wish that he had blotted hope of obtaining water and provisions. cages. They received, however, no more, and not have afforded so much At Eetoorpoo they saw a toian, or chief, further ill-treatment : and the conduct matter for prurient faction to quote of that singular aboriginal race of these of the government of Japan is painted, and revel in ?

islands, the Hairy Kuriles, and about in all the prior and subsequent pro(To be continued.)

:

ceedings, as a very curious mixture of other, and kept his feet as wide apart as A number of their domestic habits severity and kindness; always equable, though a stream of water had been running are described by Captain Golownin,

betwixt them.” and always suspicious, aiming at the

from whose notes we copy the andiscovery of the motives of Russia, The next visit on shore was the fatal

nexed : through investigations the most pa- one of the 11th of July:

“ The Japanese beds consist, according tient, persevering, and cunning; im- “ We proceeded to the castle. Ou to the circumstances of the owners, of large moveable in adhering to established entering the gate, I was astonished at the silken or cotton quilts; these quilts are forms and laws; but withal doing number of men I saw assembled there. Of lined with thick wadding, which is taken everything, consistent with the se- soldiers alone, I observed from three to out previous to their being washed. The curity of their prisoners, to render four hundred, armed with muskets, bows Japanese fold thin coverlets double, and their loss of liberty as consoling as

and arrows, and spears, sitting in a circle, spread them on the floor, which, even in

in an open space to the right: on the left the humblest cottages, is covered with possible. Some of these matters will a countless multitude of Kuriles surrounded beautiful soft straw inats. On retiring to be further explained in our extracts : a tent of striped cotton cloth, erected about rest, they wrap themselves in large nightand we hasten to wind up the narrative, thirty paces from the gate.

dresses, with short full sleeves; these are by stating, that at the end of two years “We were soon introduced into the likewise either of cotton or silk, and are and two months, the negotiations be- tent, on a seat opposite to the entrance of thickly wadded. Instead of pillows, they tween Siberia and Japan, conducted by which the governor had placed himself. make use of pieces of wood, carved in

He the friendly zeal of Lieut. Ricord, were suit of armour, and had two sabres under under their heads a piece of round wood,

wore a rich silk dress, with a complete various forms. The common people place brought to a successful issue, the affair his girdle. A long cord of white silk passed hollow at one end, and from custom, sleep of Chwostoff was satisfactorily account- over his shoulder, at one end of this cord as soundly on this as on the softest pillow. ed for, and Captain Golownin and his was a tassel of the same material, and at The higher, or richer class, make use of a comrades restored to their families and the other a steel baton, which he held in very neat box, about eleven inches high, to country.

his hand, and which was doubtless the the lid of which an oral cushion is affixed, The chief part of the facts related in symbol of his authority. His armour- from six to eight inches in length, and from these volumes, being detached from musket, and a third his helmet, sat behind articles which they make use of at the

bearers, õne holding a spear, another a two to three in breadth. The box contains the thread of the main story, which him on the floor. The helmet resembled toilette, such as razors, scissors, pomatum, details the proceedings of the Japanese that of the second officer, with this differ- tooth-brushes, powder, &c.” authorities, and the behaviour of the ence, that instead of the moon, it bore the prisoners, it will not be easy to preserve image of the sun. This officer now sat on

They are a diminutive race of people,

and, with very few exceptions, the any very regular connexion in those the left of the governor (the left is the seat points which we select as best calcu- of honour among the Japanese), on a seat Russians, though only middle-sized

somewhat lower; he too had his armour- men, looked like giants among them. lated to illustrate the peculiar habits bearers behind him. Four officers were They eat no meat, and their caution in and situation of this country; but if sitting cross-legged on the floor on each side every business of life bespeaks a degree the mass furnishes, as we think it will, of the tent; they wore black armour, and had of timidity which may be denominateil a lively picture of what is most worthy each two sabres. On our entrance, the cowardice. The whole population, and of observation, we trust the matter will governor and lieutenant-governor both rose up; we saluted them in our own manner, hear very little, contemplated the pri

particularly the women, of whom we be an apology for the manner. Among the Japanese customs, it is and they returned the compliment.”

soners with pity and compassion. From one not the least singular, to cover all The entertainment consisted of tea, different individuals, and from their their fortification outside with cloth, as pipes and tobacco, rice, fish with a guards, they experienced many a secret if to dress the walls for war. White, green sauce, and other savoury dishes; Kindness. Ten, comfits, fruits, sugar, black, and dark blue striped hangings, and concluded, as we have mentioned, and sagi, or saki, the wine of Japan, conceal entirely the nature of these de- with the seizure of the too unsuspicious were often privately adininistered to fences. Their guns are few, and in guests. At other places we find even their wants. bad condition; and their gunpowder the common soldiers clothed in rich of an inferior quality. The dress, &c. silks, and their chiefs soinetimes hold

“ The Japanese have tea of native growth, of the officers and soldiers may be ing a sort of balance, as the symbol of both black and green : the former is, how

ever, very bad; it is like the Chinese tea gathered from the following:

authority. The captain of the guard only in colour, but bears no resemblance “ I had not long to wait for the governor on the prisoners, in approaching one to it in taste or smell. The Japanese con(of Kimaschier, the person who managed of these upon the march, knelt down, stantly drink it both warm and cold, withtheir seizure): he soon appeared, com- and continued long in conversation, out sugar, as the Russians do kivass: as pletely armed, and accompanied by two with his head inclined towards the for the green tea, they drink it seldom, and soldiers, one of whom carried his long earth.

as a luxury. They previously roast or heat spear, and the other his cap, or helmet,

it at the fire, in paper canisters, until the which was adorned with a figure of the “Old men are usually appointed to the vapour issuing from it has a very strong

In other respects it somewhat re- rank which corresponds with that of a ser- smell; it is then thrown into a copper teasembled the crowns which are occasionally jeant or corporal. "They are styled kumino- kettle, containing boiling water, and thus worn at nuptial-ceremonies in Russia. It kagshra, or rice commissaries, because their acquires a particular flavour, of which the is scarcely possible to conceive any thing business chiefly consists in receiving rice Japanese are very fond, though it proved more ludicrous than the manner in which from the magazines, and dealing it out most disagreeable to us: they have no loaf the governor walked : his eyes were cast among the soldiers ; for in Japan, a por- sugar. Muscovado of the best sort is down and fixed upon the earth, his hands tion of the soldier's pay is given in rice. In brought them by the Dutch;* it is sold in pressed close against his sides; he besides Matsmai, and on the Kurile islands, they proceeded at so slow a pace, that he receive a small sum of money along with They call the Dutch “Orando," and the scarcely extended one foot beyond the the rice.

Cape of Good Hope “ Kabo."

moon.

*

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