Memoirs and Correspondence of George, Lord Lyttelton, from 1734 to 1773, Volume 1

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J. Ridgway, 1845 - 816 pages
 

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Page 716 - I have the honour to be with the greatest respect. My Lord, Your Lordship's most obedient and most Humble Servant, HT CRAMAHE.
Page 775 - you shall be my confessor: when I first set out in the world, I had friends who endeavoured to shake my belief in the Christian religion. I saw difficulties which staggered me; but I kept my mind open to conviction. The evidences and doctrines of Christianity, studied with attention, made me a most firm and persuaded believer of the Christiau religion. I have made it the rule of my life, and it is the ground of my future hopes.
Page 629 - Denbigh and Pomfret) ; both the secretaries of state silent, and the lord chief justice, whom I myself brought into office, voting for me, yet speaking against me ; the ground I tread upon is so hollow, that I am afraid, not only of falling myself, but of involving my royal master in my ruin. It is time for me to retire!
Page 642 - In truth, sir, he was the delight and ornament of this House, and the charm of every private society which he honoured with his presence. Perhaps there never arose in this country, nor in any country, a man of a more pointed and finished wit, and (where his passions were not concerned) of a more refined, exquisite, and penetrating judgment.
Page 642 - Perhaps there never arose in this country, nor in any country, a man of a more pointed and finished wit ; and (where his passions were not concerned) of a more refined, exquisite, and penetrating judgment. If he had not so great a stock as some have had who flourished formerly, of knowledge long treasured up, he knew better by far than any man I ever was acquainted with, how to bring together, within a short time, all that was necessary to establish, to illustrate, and to decorate that side of the...
Page 697 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic; such a tesselated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white...
Page 739 - Power without right is the most odious and detestable object that can be offered to the human imagination. It is not only pernicious to those who are subject to it, but tends to its own destruction. It is what my noble friend [Lord Lyttleton] has truly described it, Res detestabilis et caduca.
Page 546 - Dialogues, he deemed a nugatory performance. ' That man, (said he,) sat down to write a book, to tell the world what the world had all his life been telling him.
Page 425 - I desire that you will read it over and over again, with particular attention to the style, and to all those beauties of oratory with which it is adorned. Till I read that book, I confess I did not know all the extent and powers of the English language.
Page 439 - It behoves the piety , as well as the wisdom of parliament, to disappoint those endeavours. Sir , the very worst mischief that can be done to religion , is to pervert it to the purposes of faction. Heaven and Hell are not more distant than the benevolent spirit of the Gospel , and the malignant spirit of party.

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