Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

* Valerius Terminus" of the Interpretation of

Nature : a few fragments of the first book 218

MEDICAL RECEIPTS.

Filum Labyrinthi, sive formula Inquisitionis 232

Sequela Chartarum, sive inquisitio legitima de His lordship's usual receipt for the gout

. 252

Calore et Frigore

236 His lordship's broth and fomentation for the

stone

253

A manus Christi for the stomach

253

PHYSIOLOGICAL REMAINS.

A secret for the stomach

253

Inquisitions touching the compounding of metals 240

Questions touching minerals, with Dr. Meverel's

solutions

242

WORKS MORAL.

Of the compounding, incorporating, or union of

metals or minerals

242 A Fragment of the Colours of Good and Evil . 254

Compound metals now in use

244

Of the separation of metals and minerals 244

ESSAYS OR COUNSELS CIVIL AND MORAL.

Of the variation of metals into several shapes,

bodies, or natures

245

1. Of truth

261

Of the restitution of metals and minerals 246

2. Of death

262

Inquisition concerning the versions, transmu 3. Of unity in religion

263

tations, multiplications, and affections of

4. Of revenge

264

bodies

5. Of adversity

264

A speech concerning the recovering of drowned 6. Of simulation and dissimulation

265

mineral works

247 7. Of parents and children

265

Experiments about weight in air and water

247

8. Of marriage and single life

266

Certain sudden thoughts of the lord Bacon, set

9. Of envy

266

down by him under the title of Experiments

10. Of love

268

for Profit

248 11. Of great place

268

Experiments about the commixture of liquors 12. Of boldness

269

only, not solids, without heat or agitation, but 13. Of goodness, and goodness of nature 270

only by simple composition and settling 248 14. Of nobility

271

A catalogue of bodies, attractive and not attrac 15. Of seditions and troubles

271

tive, together with experimental observations 16. Of atheism

273

about attraction .

249 17. Of superstition

274

18. Of travel

275

19. Of empire

275

MEDICAL REMAINS.

20. Of counsel

277

Grains of youth

250 21. Of delays

278

Preserving ointments

250 22. Of cunning

278

A purge familiar for opening the liver

250 | 23. Of wisdom for a man's self

280

Wine for the spirits

250 | 24. Of innovations

280

The preparing of saffron

. 250 25. Of despatch.

280

Wine against adverse melancholy, preserving 26. Of seeming wise

231

the senses and the reason

250 | 27. Of friendship

281

Breakfast preservative against the gout and 28. Of expense

284

rheums

250 29. Of the true greatness of kingdoms and

The preparation of garlick

250 estates

294

The artificial preparation of damask roses for 30. Of regimen of health

287

smell

250 31. Of suspicion

, 287

A restorative drink

250 32. Of discourse

288

Against the waste of the body by heat. 250 33. Of plantations

288

Methusalem water: Against all asperity and 34. Of riches

289

torrefaction of inward parts, and all adustion 35. Of prophecies

290

of the blood, and generally against the dry 36. Of ambition

291

250 37. Of masques and triumphs

292

A catalogue of astringents, openers, and cor-

38. Of nature in men

292

dials.

251 39. Of custom and education

293

An extract by the lord Bacon, for his own use, 40. Of fortune

293

out of the book of the prolongation of life,

41. Of usury

294

together with some new advices in order to 42. Of youth and age

295

health

. 252 | 43. Of beauty

296

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

44. Of deformity

. 296 Certain observations upon a libel, entitled, “ AD

45. Of building

296 Declaration of the true Causes of the great

46. Of gardens

298 Troubles presupposed to be intended against

47. Of negotiating

300 the Realm of England”.

376

48. Of followers and friends

. 300 A true report of the detestable treason, intended

49. Of suitors

301 by Dr. Roderigo Lopez, a physician attend-

50. Of studies

. 301 ing upon the person of the queen's Majesty 398

51. Of faction

302 | The proceedings of the earl of Essex . 403

52. Of ceremonies and respects

302 A declaration of the practices and treasons at-

53. Of praise

303 tempted and committed by Robert earl of Es-

54. Of vain-glory

303 sex, and his complices, against her Majesty

55. Of honour and reputation

304 and her kingdoms; and of the proceedings as

56. Of judicature

. 304 well at the arraignment of the said late earl

57. Of anger

305 and his adherents, as after, together with the

58. Of vicissitude of things

. 306 very confessions, and other parts of the cvi-

Of a king

308 dences themselves, word for word, taken out

A fragment of an essay on fame

308 of the originals

408

The apology of Sir Francis Bacon, in certain

A Collection of Apophthegms, new and old 310 imputations concerning the late earl of Es-

Ornamenta Rationalia

331

433

Short Notes for civil Conversation

334 A speech in parliament, 39 of Elizabeth, upon

An Essay on Death .

334

the motion of subsidy

441

A proclamation drawn for his Majesty's first com-

ing in .

443

THEOLOGICAL WORKS.

A draught of a proclamation touching his Majes-

ty's style

445

A confession of faith

337 A speech made by Sir Francis Bacon, knight,

A prayer or psalm

339

chosen by the commons to present a petition

A prayer

340 touching purveyors

447

The student's prayer

341 A brief discourse of the happy union of the king-

The writer's prayer

341 doms of England and Scotland

449

The characters of a believing christian, in para Certain articles or considerations touching the

doxes, and seeming contradictions

341 union of the kingdoms of England and Scot-

An advertisement touching the controversies of land

. 453

the church of England

343 The certificate or return of the commissioners

Certain considerations touching the better paci of England and Scotland, authorized to treat

fication and edification of the church of Eng-

of an union

459

land

351 A speech in the house of commons, concerning

Circumstances in the government of bishops 353 the article of the general naturalization of the

Concerning the liturgy, the ceremonies and sub Scottish nation

. 461

scription

355 A speech in the lower house of parliament, by

Touching a preaching ministry.

357 occasion of a motion concerning the union of

Touching the abuse of excommunication 358 laws

468

Touching non-residents and pluralities 358 Considerations touching the plantation in Ire-

Touching the provision for sufficient maintenance land

470

in the church

359 A report in the house of commons, of a speech

The translation of certain psalms into English delivered by the earl of Salisbury; and another

speech delivered by the earl of Northampton,

Psalm 1.

360 at a conference concerning the petition of the

Psalm xii.

360 merchants upon the Spanish grievances 474

Psalm xc.

361 A certificate to his Majesty touching the projects

Psalm civ.

361 of Sir Stephen Proctor relating to the penal

Psalm cxxvI.

362 laws

480

Psalm cxXXVII.

362 A speech used to the king by his Majesty's so-

Psalm cxlix.

363 licitor, being chosen by the commons, as their

mouth and messenger, for the presenting to

WORKS POLITICAL.

his Majesty the instrument or writing of their

grievances

483

Of the state of Europe

364 A specch used unto the lords at a conference by
Mr. Bacon's discourse in praise of his sovereign 370 commission from the commons, moving and

.

[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

veram

.

persuading the lords to join with the commons 10. Verba generalia restringuntur ad habilitatem

in petition to the king, to obtain liberty to

rei vel persona

558

treat of a composition with his Majesty for 11. Jura sanguinis nullo jure civili dirimi

wards and tenures

484 possunt

559

A frame of declaration for the master of the 12. Receditur a placitis juris potius, quam in-

wards at his first sitting

485 juriæ et delicta maneant impunita

559

Directions for the master of the wards to observe, 13. Non accipi debent verba in demonstra-

for his Majesty's better service, and the gene tionem falsam, quæ competunt in limitationem

ral good

486

560

A speech, persuading the house of commons to 14. Licet dispositio de interesse futuro sit inutilis,

desist from further question of receiving the tamen potest fieri declaratio præcedens quæ

king's messages by their speaker, and from sortiatur effectum interveniente novo actu . 561

the body of the council, as well as from the 15. In criminalibus sufficit generalis malitia in-

king's person

487 tentionis cum facto paris gradus

An argument in the lower house of parliament, 16. Mandata licita recipiunt strictam interpre-

proving the king's right of impositions on tationem, sed illicita latam et extensam 562

terchandises imported and exported

489 17. De fide et officio judicis non recipitur quæs-

A brief speech persuading some supply to be tio; sed de scientia, sive error sit juris sive

given to his Majesty

492 facti

562

A certificate to the lords of the council, upon 18. Persona conjuncta æquiparatur interesse

information given touching the scarcity of sil proprio

. 563

ver at the mint

492 19. Non impedit clausula derogatoria, quo minus

Advice to the king touching Mr. Sutton's estate 494 ab eadem potestate res dissolvantur, a quibus
A speech in the lower house, when the house constituuntur

564
was in great heat about the undertakers . 497 20. Actus inceptus, cujus perfectio pendet ex

A speech in parliament, being lord chancellor, voluntate partium, revocari potest; si autem

to the speaker's excuse

499 pendet ex voluntate tertiæ personæ, vel ex

Of the true greatness of the kingdom of Britain 502 contingenti, revocari non potest

565
Advice to Sir George Villiers, afterward duke of

21. Clausula vel dispositio inutilis per presump-

Buckingham, when he became favourite to tionem vel causam remotam, ex post facto

king James

508 non fulcitur

565

Advertisement touching a holy war

521 | 22. Non videtur consensum retinuisse si quis ex

Notes of a speech concerning a war with Spain 530 præscripto minantis aliquid immutavit . 567

Considerations touching a war with Spain

532 23. Licita bene miscentur, formula nisi juris

obstet

567

24. Præsentia corporis tollit errorem nominis, et

LAW TRACTS.

veritas nominis tollit errorem demonstrationis 568

25. Ambiguitas verborum latens verificatione

THE ELEMENTS OF THE COMMON LAWS OF ENGLAND. suppletur ; nam quod ex facto oritur ambi-

guum verificatione facti tollitur

. 569

MAXIMS OF THE LAW.

The use of the law, for preservation of our per.

1. In jure non remota causa sed proxima spec sons, goods, and good names

570

tatur.

. 548 The use of the law consisteth principally in

2. Non potest adduci exceptio ejusdem rei, these three things :

cujus petitur dissolutio

549

1. To secure men's persons from death and

3. Verba fortius accipiuntur contra proferentem 550 violence.

4. Quod sub certa forma concessum vel rescr 2. To dispose the property of their goods and

vatum est, non trahitur ad valorem vel com-

lands.

pensationem

3. For preservation of their good names from

5. Necessitas inducit privilegium quoad jura shame and infamy

570

privata

554 Property of lands,

6. Corporalis injuria non recipit æstimationem

1. By entry

de futuro

555 2. By descent

576

7. Excusat aut extenuat delictum in capitalibus, 3. By escheat

577

quod non operatur idem in civilibus

555 4. By conveyance

. 581

8. Æstimatio præteriti delicti ex postremo Property in goods,

facto nunquam crescit

556

1. By gift

586

9. Quod remedio destitnitur ipea re valet si 2. By sale

586

culpa absit

556 3. By stealing

586

REGULA

• 553

576

.

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

4. By waving

. 586 The argument in the case of the post-nati of

5. By straying

586 Scotland, in the exchequer-chamber

652

6. By shipwreck

586 | A proposition touching the compiling and

7. By forfeiture

587 amendment of the laws of England . . 666

8. By executorship

587 An offer to king James of a digest to be made of

9. By administration

587 the laws of England

670

10. By legacy.

588 The judicial charge upon the commission of

An account of the lately-erected service, called Oyer and Terminer held for the verge of the
the Office of Compositions for Alienations 588 Court

673
The learned reading upon the statute of Uses. A charge at the arraignment of the lord
Being his double reading to the honourable Sanquhar

677
society of Gray's Inn. 42 Elizabeth 597 | Charge touching duels

. 679

Arguments in law in certain great and difficult The decree of the star-chamber against duels 683

615 | Charge against William Talbot, a counsellor at

The case of impeachment of Waste

616 law, of Ireland

686

The argument in Low's case of tenures 623 The charge against Mr. Oliver St. John, for

The case of revocation of uses

627 scandalizing and traducing, in the public

The jurisdiction of the marches

631 sessions, letters sent from the lords of the

A draught of an act against an usurious shift of council touching the benevolence

689

gain, in delivering of commodities instead of The charge against Owen, indicted of high

money

641 treason

693

A preparation toward the union of the laws of The charge against Mr. Lumsden, Sir John

England and Scotland

641 Wentworth, and Sir John Holles, for scandal

Cases of treason.

642 and traducing of the king's justice in the pro-

The punishment, trial, and proceedings, in cases ceedings against Weston

695

of treason

643 The charge, by way of evidence, against Frances

Cases of misprision of treason

643 countess of Somerset, concerning the poison-

Cases of petit treason

643 ing of Sir Thomas Overbury

699

The punishment, trial, and proceeding, in cases The charge, by way of evidence, against Robert

of petit treason

643 earl of Somerset, concerning the poisoning of

Cases of felony

644 Overbury

704

The punishment, trial, and proceeding, in cases The effect of that which was spoken by the lord

of felony

644

keeper of the great seal of England, at the

Cases of felonia de se, with the punishment, taking of his place in chancery

709

trial, and proceeding therein

645 The speech which was used by the lord keeper

Cases of præmunire

645 of the great seal, in the star-chamber, before

The punishment, trial, and proceedings, in cases the summer circuits

712

of præmunire

645 The speech to Sir William Jones, upon his

Cases of abjuration and exile, and the proceed being called to be lord chief justice of Ireland 714

ings therein

646 The speech to Sir John Denham, when he

Cases of heresy, and the trial and proceeding was called to be one of the barons of the

therein

646 exchequer

715

The king's prerogative in parliament

616 The speech to Justice Hution, when he was

The king's prerogative in matters of war and called to be one of the judges of the common

peace

646

pleas

716

The king's prerogative in matter of money 646 Ordinances for the better and more regular ad-

The king's prerogative in matters of trade and ministration of justice in chancery

716

traffic

646 The passages in parliament against Francis

The king's prerogative in the persons of his viscount St. Alban, lord chancellor of Eng-

subjects

646 land

722

A twofold power of the law

647

A twofold power in the king

647

An explanation what manner of persons those

WRITINGS HISTORICAL.

should be, that are to execute the power or

ordinance of the king's prerogative

647 | The History of the reign of King Henry the

The office of constables, original and use of Seventh

731

courts leet, sheriff's turn, &c. with the The History of the reign of King Henry the

answers to the questions propounded by Sir Eighth

795

Alexander Hay, knight, touching the office The beginning of the History of Great

of constables

648

Britain

796

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

.

.

.

INTRODUCTORY ESSAY.

“LORD BAСon was the greatest genius that England, or perhaps any other country, has ever produced.” So says Pope, after he had penned that bitter couplet upon Bacon, which has passed into a proverb; and the saying is related by Spence.

This is the judgment expressed by a favourite poet, concerning an English writer of the seventeenth century, the formation of which pre-supposes the most exalted qualifications. To be entitled to assert such an opinion absolutely, would require almost supernatural endowments, and a universal acquaintance with the famous characters of all countries. It would involve the collation of eras and cycles; it would be, to raise the dead and scrutinize the living—to examine the long muster-roll of the sons of genius, and make a doomsday book of it—to weigh libraries and ransack universities—to glance at all, and single out one, and say, that “this man was the greatest of men—the greatest not of a city, but of the world—not of one age, but of all time.”

But although it may not be possible to come to any such absolute conclusion; and to assert it roundly would be as extravagant as gravely to refute it would be ridiculous; and even if it were feasible we have no security for its justice ;—the dictum is nevertheless a very remarkable one; and, construed in the probable sense in which it was evidently spoken, it is a most interesting one. It is the deliberate opinion of a man, who united great genius with consummate judgment, and had won his way to the summit of reputation as a poet; of one who was a vigorous thinker, acute observer, accomplished scholar, and, in short, the foremost man in the most brilliant circle of our Augustan age. He was, also, totally devoid of enthusiasm ; and his associations were all of the nil admirari caste : with Swift, the bitterest of our satirists, Bolingbroke, the most satiated of libertines and the most disappointed of politicians, Arbuthnot, one of the strongest-minded men of his time,-and many others of contemporary repute; in fact, all his chosen friends were, like himself, professed wits and nothing more-men who could not have done what they did, or been what they were, the ablest critics of life and manners in the language, without throwing away every thing that savoured of strong feeling, zealous affections, or passionate admiration. He was, moreover, not only versed in ancient learning, but well acquainted with modern speculations and discoveries. Locke is always mentioned with the respect of a disciple ; he prepared an epitaph for Newton, which speaks for itself; and, when we recollect that the controversy between the ancients and moderns was then raging, it must not merely be admitted that he was entitled to pronounce the opinion which we have quoted, but it may be inferred that the opinion which he gave was that of his age.

b

« PreviousContinue »