Dr. Johnson: His Religious Life and His Death ...

Front Cover
Harper & Brothers, 1850 - 405 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 381 - The Englishman's Greek Concordance of the New Testament : Being an Attempt at a Verbal Connexion between the Greek and the English Texts ; including a Concordance to the Proper Names, with Indexes, GreekEnglish and English-Greek. New Edition, with a new Index. Royal 8vo. price 42s. The Englishman's Hebrew and Chaldee Concordance...
Page 39 - For men verily swear by the greater: and an oath for confirmation is to them an end of all strife.
Page 276 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me, and from my friends, be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Page 207 - Not for that we have dominion over your faith, but are helpers of your joy : for by faith ye stand.
Page 184 - And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out. So much the rather thou, celestial Light, Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers Irradiate ; there plant eyes, all mist from thence Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell Of things invisible to mortal sight.
Page 26 - Rousseau, sir, is a very bad man. I would sooner sign a sentence for his transportation, than that of any felon who has gone from the Old Bailey these many years. Yes, I should like to have him work in the plantations.
Page 22 - Pride was the source of that refusal, and the remembrance of it was painful. A few years ago, I desired to atone for this fault ; I went to Uttoxeter in very bad weather, and stood for a considerable time bare-headed in the rain, on the spot where my father's stall used to stand. In contrition I stood, and I hope the penance was expiatory.
Page 363 - Sir, he was a scoundrel, and a coward : a scoundrel for charging a blunderbuss against religion and morality ; a coward, because he had not resolution to fire it off himself, but left half a crown to a beggarly Scotchman to draw the trigger after his death...
Page 28 - Christianity is the highest perfection of humanity ; and as no man is good but as he wishes the good of others, no man can be good in the highest degree, who wishes not to others the largest measures of the greatest good.
Page 348 - The doctor, having first asked him if he could bear the whole truth, which way soever it might lead, and being answered that he could, declared that, in his opinion, he could not recover without a miracle. " Then," said Johnson, " I will take no more physic, not even my opiates ; for I have prayed that I may render up my soul to God unclouded.

Bibliographic information