The Scots Magazine, Or, General Repository of Literature, History, and Politics, Volume 65

Front Cover
Alex Chapman and, 1803
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - To be of no church is dangerous. Religion, of which the rewards are distant, and which is animated only by faith and hope, will glide by degrees out of the mind, unless it be invigorated and reimpressed by external ordinances, by stated calls to worship, and the salutary influence of example.
Page 156 - He loved fairies, genii, giants, and monsters; he delighted to rove through the meanders of enchantment, to gaze on the magnificence of golden palaces, to repose by the waterfalls of Elysian gardens.
Page 39 - New-Machar, the greater part of his time was spent in the most intense study, more particularly in a careful examination of the laws of external Perception, and of the other principles which form the groundwork of human knowledge.
Page 40 - What evidence have I for this doctrine, that all the objects of my knowledge are ideas in my own mind ? From that time to the present I have been candidly and impartially, as I think, seeking for the evidence of this principle, but can find none, excepting the authority of philosophers.
Page 319 - Many, when they have boiled their rice, put water into the tatche in which the rice was boiled, to •which some grains always adhere ; the water loosens them, and is browned by the rice : that water they drink instead of tea.
Page 387 - ... eagerness and avidity with which they run to them when arrived, in hopes of a rich cargo ; the vast numbers of jewellers, brokers, merchants, of all colours and all descriptions, both natives and foreigners who are occupied in some way or other with the pearls, some separating and assorting them, others weighing and ascertaining their number and value, while others are hawking them about, or drilling and boring them for future use ; — all these circumstances tend to impress the mind with the...
Page 191 - ... greatest importance. Both of them, however, were the friends of virtue and of mankind ; and both were able to temper the warmth of free discussion, with the forbearance and good humour founded on reciprocal esteem. No two men...
Page 235 - ... always go with inclination to the turn of the company he is going into, or not pretend to be of the party. It is certainly a very happy temper to be able to live with all kinds of...
Page 188 - As they were occasioned, therefore," he adds, " by the infirmities of age, they will, I hope be heard with the greater indulgence." Among the various occupations with which he thus enlivened his retirement, the mathematical pursuits of his earlier years held a distinguished place. He delighted to converse about them with his friends ; and often exercised his skill in the investigation of particular problems. His knowledge of ancient geometry had not probably been, at any time, very...
Page 256 - ... skill and judgment he put in his answers. He advanced nothing unbecoming a good man ; and if his real sentiments agreed with his professions, he was so far from deserving to die, that his principles did not even give just ground for the slightest offence. He denied the whole impeachment, as a fiction...

Bibliographic information