The Sidereal Messenger: A Monthly Review of Astronomy, Volume 6

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Carleton College Observatory, 1887

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Page 94 - But in the days of the voice of the seventh angel, when he shall begin to sound, the mystery of God should be finished, as he hath declared to his servants the prophets.
Page 64 - And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth : and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born.
Page 271 - As a centre stood the full and intensely black disc of the moon, surrounded by an aureola of soft bright light, through which shot out, as if from the circumference of the moon, straight massive silvery rays, seeming distinct and separate from each other, to a distance of two or three diameters of the lunar disc ; the whole spectacle showing as upon a background of diffused rose-coloured light...
Page 349 - Yet already it may be and has been called " the astronomy of the future " : so rapidly has the development of a keen and universal interest attended and stimulated the growth of power to investigate this sublime subject. What has been done is little is scarcely a beginning; yet it is much in comparison with the total blank of a century past. And our knowledge will, we are easily persuaded, appear in turn the merest ignorance to those who come after us. Yet it is not to be despised, since by it...
Page 266 - Raising my eyes as usual, during one of my walks to the well known vault of heaven, I observed with indescribable astonishment, near the zenith in Cassiopeia, a radiant fixed star of a magnitude never before seen. In my amazement I doubted the evidence of my senses. However, to convince myself that it was no illusion, and to have the testimony of others, I summoned my assistants from the laboratory and inquired of them, and of all the country people that passed by, if they also observed the star...
Page 27 - Trouvelot has reported a number of remarkable phenomena, most of which, however, he alone has seen as yet. The most recent micrometric measures have failed to confirm Struve's suspicion that the rings are contracting on the planet. Extensive series of observations have been made upon the satellites by H. Struve, Meyer, and others in Europe, and by Hall in this country. Hall's observations are especially valuable, and the series is now so nearly completed that we may soon hope to have most accurate...
Page 127 - Suppose then, a mass containing silicon, magnesium, iron, nickel, a limited supply of oxygen and small quantities of other elements, all in their primordial or nebulous state (whatever that may be) segregated somewhere in the cold of space. As the materials consolidate or crystallize, the oxygen is appropriated by the silicon and magnesium, and the iron and nickel are deposited in metallic form. Possibly the heat developed may, before it is radiated into space, modify and transform the substance.
Page 19 - I know, the discussion of the subject which has resulted from his publication has only strengthened the older view that the corona is a true solar appendage ; an intensely luminous but excessively attenuated cloud of mingled gas and fog and dust surrounding the sun, formed and shaped by solar forces.
Page 5 - Survey in this country and elsewhere, and a very important part of it has consisted in connecting the older work with the new, by Peirce's operations in Europe, and those of Herschel, in this country. At the same time it has become increasingly evident that very little is now to be gained by endeavoring to find a spheroid fitting the earth's actual form more closely. It will be best simply to adopt some standard (say that of Clarke, but it makes very little difference what), and to investigate hereafter...
Page 12 - ... be necessary to wait for a longer and more widely extended collection of statistics to settle the question. We do not even know as yet whether we get more or less than the average heat from the sun during the sun-spot maximum. But I think it may be set down as certain that the condition of the sun's surface exerts, if perhaps a real, yet only a very slight effect upon our earthly meteorology. With terrestrial magnetism the case is markedly and singularly different, and one of the most interesting...

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