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IMPORTANT HISTORICAL WORK.

D. APPLETON & CO. HAVE JUST PUBLISHED,

A MANUAL

OF

ANCIENT AND MODERN HISTORY.

COMPRISING

I.

Ancient History; Containing the Political History, Geographical Position, and Social State of the Principal Nations of Antiquity, carefully revised from the ancient writers, and illustrated

by the discoveries of Modern Scholars and Travellers.

II.

Modern History; Containing the Rise and Progress of the Principal European Nations, their Political History, and

the changes in their Social Condition, with a History, of

the Colonies founded by Europeans.

BY W. COOKE TAYLOR, LL. D.,

Of Trinity College, Dublin.
Revised, with an Additional Chapter on the United States,

BY O. S. HENRY, D. D.,
Professor of History in the University of New-York

One handsome volume 800. of upwards of 700 pages. For the convenience of Students as a text book, the Ancient or Modern portions can be had separately bound.

The ANCIENT HISTORY division comprises Eighteen Chapters, which include the general outlines of the History of Egypt-the Ethiopians-Babylonia and Assyria-Western Asia-Palestine -the Empire of the Medes and Persiang--Phenician Colonies in Northern Africa-Foundation and History of the Grecian States-Greece-the Macedonian Kingdom and Empire the States that arose from the Dismemberment of the Macedonian Empire--Ancient Italy—Sicily-the Roman Republic Geographical and Political Condition of the Roman Empire-History of the Roman Empire—and India--with an Appendix of important illustrative articles.

This portion is one of the best Compends of Ancient History that ever yet has appeared. It contains a complete text for the collegiate lecturer; and is an essential hand-book for the student who is desitous to become acquainted with all that is memorable in general secular archæology,

The MODERN HISTORY portion is divided into Fourteen Chapters, on the following general subjects :-Consequences of the Fall of the Western Empire-Rise and Establishment of the Saracenic Power-Restoration of the Western Empire-Growth of the Papal Power-Revival of Literature-Progress of Civilization and Invention-Reformation, and Commencement of the States System in Europe-Augustan Ages of England and France-Mercantile and Colonial System-Age of Revolutions—French Empire-History of the Peace--Colonization-China--the Jews--with Chronological and Historical Tables, and other Indexes. Dr. Henry has appended a new chapter on the History of the United States.

This Manual of Modern History, by Mr. Taylor, is the most valuable and instructive work concerning the general subjects which it comprehends, that can be found in the whole department of historical literature.

D. Appleton & Co. have

IN COURSE OF PUBLICATION IN PARTS, PRICE 25 CENTS EACH,

HISTORY OF FRANCE,

FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PRESENT TIME.

BY M. MICHELET, Professeur-suppléant à la Faculté Des Lettres, Professeur à L'Ecole Normale,

Chef de la Section Historique aux Archives du Royaume.

TRANSLATED BY G. H. SMITH, F. G. 8., &c.

The celebrity of this work on the Continent, and the want in English Literature of a good history of France, has induced the publishers to introduce it to the American public at a price within the means of all.

It is designed to publish the work in monthly parts, (or oftener if possible.) Two parts of the American edition containing a volume of the Paris, at one-third the cost. The whole work will probably make sixteen Nos., and bind in four octavo volumes.

OPINIONS OF HIGH CRITICAL AUTHORITIES.

From the Foreign Quarterly Review, Vol. 50. “ M. Michelet, whose Historical labors both on Ancient and Modern topics have long rendered him a great favorite with the French public, is placed in one of the must ertviable situations that an historian can hold, as chief of the Historical Secrion in the Archives du loyaume—all the riches of this immense ettablishment are in his own keeping ; and this circumstance, added to his honorable position of Professor of History for France, puts him at once at the head of the historical portion of his own countrymen. To the accumulated stores of a life of continual research he adds the precious acquirements of a most accomplished modern linguist, and a well read scholar in the tongues of classical antiquity; he possesses unwearied powers of application, and is one of the most concientious searchers of original documents that is any where to be met with. . . . The highly poetical and religious turn of mind of this author leads him to place every thing in new and original points of view ; his descriptions are accurate, full of details, and eminently graphic. After quoting passages from the author's work, the reviewer says : These passages, which we have cited at considerable length in order to make the reader more fully acquainted with M. Micbelet's style, are too beautiful, too dramatic, to need much comment of our own. We need only say that the same strain of poesy prevades almost every page of his book; that as the reader turns over leaf after leaf he finds new views opening to his sight, new methods of treating matters of previously well known historical celebrity, and every where the most cheering and amiable display of candor, moderation, and conscientious judgement. It is impossible to peruse these volumes without feeling a regard for the author that increases the farther we advance in them."-For. Quarterly Review, Vol. L.

“ Michelet's History has only to be translated to become one of the most popular books ever published. The author is a man of the highest genius ; his erudition is wonderful, and he is at once philosophic and dramatic, uniting the severest judgment to the most facile and delicate imagination. His history is thus not only a succession of faithful pictures but a series of the profoundest deductions. The modern French school of history, comprising as it does, among many illustrious

mes, those of Thiers, Guizot, and Thierry, is deservedly acknowledged as the first Europe, and at the head of it we should certainly place Mons. Michelet." nthly Magazine.

THE

LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE

OF

THOMAS ARNOLD, D.D.,

LATE HEAD-MASTER OF RUGBY SCHOOL,

AND

REGIUS PROFESSOR OF MODERN HISTORY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.

BY

ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, M. A.,

FELLOW AND TUTOR OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, OXFORD.

FIRST AMERICAN, FROM THE THIRD ENGLISH EDITION.

THE TWO VOLUMES COMPLETE IN ONE.

NEW-YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 200 BROADWAY.

PHILADELPHIA :
GEO, S. APPLETON, 148 CHESNUT-STREET.

MDCCCXLV.

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PREFACE.

The sources from which this work has been drawn have necessarily been exceedingly various. It was in fact originally intended that the several parts should have been supplied by different writers, as in the instance of the valuable contribution which, in addition to his kind assistance throughout, has been furhished to the earlier part by Mr. Justice Coleridge; and although, in its present shape, the responsibility of arranging and executing it has fallen upon one person, yet it should be clearly understod how largely I have availed myself of the aid of others, in order to supply the defects of my own personal knowledge of Dr. Arnold's life and character, which was confined to the intercourse I enjoyed with him, first as his pupil at Rugby, from 1829 to 1834, and thenceforward, on more familiar terms, to the end of his life.

To his family, I feel that the fewest words will best express my sense, both of the confidence which they reposed in me by intrusting to my care so precious a charge, and of the manifold kindness with which they have assisted me, as none others could. To the many attached friends of his earlier years, the occurrence of whose names in the following pages makes it unnecessary to mention them more particularly here, I would also take this opportunity of expressing my deep obligations, not only for the readiness with which they have given me access to all letters and information that I could require, but still more for the active interest which they have taken in lightening my responsibility and labour, and for the careful and most valuable criticism to which some of them have allowed me to subject the whole or the greater part of this work. Lastly, his pupils will perceive the unsparing use I have made of their numerous contributions. I had at one time thought of indicating the various distinct authorities from which the chapter on his "School Life at Rug

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