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gerous tenets, contended for the necessity of a community of goods among Christians. This doctrine was warmly and successfully opposed by the most enlightened part of the Reformers upon the continent; it made but very little progress in this country; and our present Anabaptists entirely reject it. Luther gives the following account of the Anabaptists of his time: “Docentes Christiano nihil esse possidendum, non jurandum, nullos magistratus habendos, non exercenda judicia, neminem tuendum aut defendendum, uxores et liberos deserendos, atque id genus portenta quamplurima (c).

No duty is more frequently or more earnestly inculcated in the New Testament than charity; and therefore EVERY MAN OUGHT, OF SUCH THINGS AS HE POSSESSETH, LIBERÁLLY TO GIVE ALMS TO THE POOR, ACCORDING TO HIS ABILITY. No specific rule is laid down in Scripture concerning the proportion which a man is bound to give of his property in acts of benevolence : but the great importance annexed to the performance of this duty by Christ and his Apostles, makes it highly incumbent upon every one to practice it to the utmost of his means.

(c) Pref. ad Ex. in Mat. 5, 6, 7.

ARTICLE THE THIRTY-NINTH.

Of a Christian Man's Oath.

LIGION DOT

VOT PROHI

BUT TH.

AS WE CONFESS THAT VAIN AND RASH SWEAR

ING IS FORBIDDEN CHRISTIAN MEN BY OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST AND JAMES HIS APOSTLE, so WE JUDGE THAT THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION DOTH NOT PROHIBIT, BUT THAT A MAN MAY SWEAR WHEN THE MAGISTRATE REQUIRETH, IN A CAUSE OF FAITH AND CHARITY, so IT BE DONE ACCORDING TO THE PROPHET'S TEACHING, IN JUSTICE, JUDGMENT, AND TRUTH.

AS WE CONFESS THAT VAIN AND RASH SWEARING IS FORBIDDEN CHRISTIAN MEN BY OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST AND JAMES HIS APOSTLE: The passages here referred to are the following; our Saviour in his sermon upon the Mount says, “Swear not at all, neither by heaven, for it is God's throne; nor by the earth, for it is his footstool ; neither by Jerusalem, for for it is the city of the great King; neither shalt thou swear by thy head, because thou canst not make one: hair white or black; but let your communication be yea, yea, nay, nay, for what

soever is more than these cometh of evil (a).And St. James in his Epistle says, “ Above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath, but let your yea be yea, and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemnation (6).” The Jews, in the time of our Saviour, were very much addicted to the use of oaths of various sorts in common conversation, and the above pas sages were directed against that practice : this appears from the expression, “ Let your communication be yea, yea, nay, nay,” which words plainly allude to the ordinary intercourse of social life, and are not applicable to the solemnity of judicial proceedings. And this also is evident from the enumeration of things not to be sworn by, namely, “ Heaven, Earth, Jerusalem, and the Head,” none of which oaths were ever used before magistrates ; and the general precepts “Swear not at all,” and “Swear not by any other oath,” must be considered as prohi biting only all such oaths as are like those which are particularly specified, that is, every kind of VAIN AND RASH SWEARING, but not oaths administered by proper authority, and upon proper occasions.

So

(a) Matt. c. 5. v. 34, &c.
(b) James, c. 5. v. 12.

VEJUDGE THAT THE CH

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SOWEJUDGE THATTHE CHRISTIAN RELIGION DOTH NOT PROHIBIT, BUT THAT A MAN MAY SWEAR WHEN THE MAGISTRATE REQUIRETH, IN A CAUSE OF FAITH AND CHARITY, SO IT BE DONE ACCORDING TO THE PROPHET'S TEACHING, IN JUSTICE, JUDGMENT, AND TRUTH. All decisions in courts of judicature, and proceedings before magistrates, must be founded upon evidence; and therefore whatever promotes the veracity of witnesses contributes to the preservation of justice and order in the world. The strongest obligation to truth, which can operate upon the minds of men, is a solemn appeal to God; and upon that principle oaths have been constantly used in the administration of municipal and criminal law. These oaths are not forbidden in Scripture; and therefore magistrates are at liberty to require them, in the execution of their office, as the best means of attaining the great ends of civil government. The article says, IN A CAUSE OF FAITH AND CHARITY, that is, when faith or truth is to be established, and charity or good-will among men can be promoted by putting an end to strife, “ for an oath for confirmation is an end of all controversy (c),” which words admit the lawfulness of an oath, when applied to the settle

ment (c) Heb. c. 6. v. 16.

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ment of points in litigation. St. Paul in his Epistles frequently calls God to witness the truth of what he asserts (d), which proves that all oaths are not unlawful in Christians.

Profane swearing is forbidden by the third commandment; but that prohibition was evidently not designed to extend to every use of oaths; for Moses expressly says, “ Thou shalt fear the Lord thy God, and serve him, and shalt swear by his name (e).” And under the Jewish dispensation, judges had a power to adjure in the name of God, either to draw a confession from an accused person, or a faithful testimony from a witness: “ if a soul sin, and hear the voice of swearing (or adjuration) and is a witness whether he hath seen or known it; if he do not utter it, then he shall bear his iniquity (f)." And thus our Saviour himself, in obedience to this law of Moses, although he had before been silent, answered the high priest, when he adjured him by the living God (g), that is, called upon him to answer upon oath. The form of administering oaths among us is different from that formerly practised among the

Jews ; (d) Rom. C. 1. v. 9. c. 9. v. 1. 2 Cor. c. 1. v. 18.

Gal. c. 1. V. 20. re) Deut. c. 6. v. 13. (f) Lev. c. 5. v. 1. Vide Patrick in loc. (g) Matt. c. 26. v. 63.

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