The Works of Beaumont and Fletcher (Volume 1) ~ Paperbound

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Classic Books Company

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Contents

I
iii
II
v
IV
lxxxviii
V
lxxxix
VI
xci
VII
i
VIII
iii
IX
vii
XXVI
120
XXVII
144
XXVIII
161
XXIX
179
XXX
195
XXXI
197
XXXII
205
XXXIII
206

X
xi
XI
xiii
XII
1
XIII
5
XIV
7
XV
9
XVI
11
XVII
26
XVIII
40
XIX
59
XX
78
XXI
99
XXII
101
XXIII
105
XXIV
107
XXV
109
XXXIV
207
XXXV
209
XXXVI
230
XXXVII
247
XXXVIII
264
XXXIX
278
XL
284
XLI
311
XLII
319
XLIII
320
XLIV
321
XLV
342
XLVI
360
XLVII
383
XLVIII
405

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Page l - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! Heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtle flame As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.
Page 358 - Do my face (If thou had'st ever feeling of a sorrow) Thus, thus, Antiphila : strive to make me look Like Sorrow's monument ; and the trees about me, Let them be dry and leafless ; let the rocks Groan with continual surges ; and behind me, Make all a desolation.
Page li - Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life ; then when there hath been thrown Wit able enough to justify the town For three days past ; wit that might warrant be For the whole City to talk foolishly Till that were cancell'd ; and when that was gone, We left an air behind us, which alone Was able to make the two next companies Right witty...
Page lxxxv - The fair-eyed maids shall weep our banishments, And in their songs curse ever-blinded Fortune, Till she for shame see what a wrong she has done To youth and nature. This is all our world: We shall know nothing here, but one another; Hear nothing, but the clock that tells our woes. The vine shall grow, but we shall never see it : Summer shall come, and with her all delights, But dead-cold winter must inhabit here still.
Page 165 - Tis of all sleeps the sweetest ; Children begin it to us, strong men seek it, And kings from height of all their painted glories Fall like spent exhalations to this centre : And those are fools that fear it...
Page 235 - Oh, they are two twinn'd cherries dy'd in blushes Which those fair suns above with their bright beams Reflect upon and ripen ! Sweetest beauty, Bow down those branches, that the longing taste Of the faint looker-on may meet those blessings, And taste and live.
Page 303 - Cap. Go thy ways, thou art the king of courtesy ! Fall off again, my sweet youths. Come, And every man trace to his house again, And hang his pewter up ; then to the tavern, And bring your wives in muffs.

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