Proceedings of the ... Annual Meeting of the Society for the Promotion of Agricultural Science, Volume 24, Parts 1903-1908

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Page 18 - That in order to aid in acquiring and diffusing among the people of the United States useful and practical information on subjects connected with agriculture, and to promote scientific investigation and experiment respecting the principles and applications of agricultural science...
Page 30 - ... the chemical composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the agricultural industry of the United States as may in each...
Page 30 - That it shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their different stages of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops ; the capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water...
Page 62 - Greek, however perfectly, is enough to stultify a whole generation of boys and make them all pedantic fools like himself. The idea of infusing mind, or creating, or even materially increasing it by the daily inculcation of unintelligible words all this awful wringing to get blood out of a turnip will, at any rate, never succeed except in the hands of the eminently wise and prudent, who have had long experience in the process; the plain, blunt sense of the unsophisticated will never realize...
Page 7 - Woe unto you that are full! for ye shall hunger. Woe unto you that laugh now! for ye shall mourn and weep. 26 Woe unto you, when all men shall speak well of you! for so did their fathers to the false prophets.
Page 63 - I think the exclusive and extravagant claims set up for ancient lore, as a means of disciplining the reasoning powers, simply ridiculous when examined in the light of those ancient worthies who produced that literature, or the modern ones who have been most devoted to its pursuit in this country and in Europe. If it produces infallible practical reasoners, we have a great many thousand infallible antagonistic truths, and ten thousand conflicting paths of right, interest, duty, and salvation. If any...
Page 17 - Ohio" confirmed the provision of 1785, and declared that "religion, morality and knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall be forever encouraged.
Page 56 - ... both of those on the premises and of those brought in from abroad;, and advice given, and annual reports made on those and all similar topics. Let the professors of physiology and entomology be ever abroad at the proper seasons, with the needful apparatus for seeing all things...
Page 56 - ... agriculture and mechanic or chemical art, mining, merchandise and transportation by water and by land, and daily practical and experimental instruction given to each student in attendance in his own chosen sphere of research, or labor, in life. Especially let the comparative merits of all labor saving tools, instruments, machines, engines, and processes, be thoroughly and practically tested and explained so that their benefits might be at once enjoyed or the expense of their cost avoided by the...
Page 60 - A man of real skill is amazed at the slovenly ignorance and waste he everywhere discovers, on all parts of their premises; and still more to hear them boast of their ignorance of all "book farming," and maintain that "their children can do as well as they have done;" and it certainly would be a great pity if they could not. The patrons of our University would be found in the former, not in the latter class. The man whose highest conception of earthly bliss is a log hut...

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