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We must surrender our Laws, Liberties, Properties and Lives, into the Hands of infolent Mercenaries, whose Rage and via lence will command us, and all we have, and Reason, Honour and Justice will leave our Land; the Ignoble will rule the Noble, and Bafeness will be preferred before Virtue, Prophaneness before Piety.

Of a potent People, we shall make our selves weak, and be the Instruments of our own Ruine, perditio tua ex te, will be said i of us ; We shall burn our own Houses, lay waste our own Fields, pillage our own Goods, open our own Veins, and eat out our own Bowels. You will hear other Sounds, besides those of Drums and Trumpets, the clattering of Armour, the roaring of Guns; the Groans of wounded and dying Men, the Șhrięks of defloured Women, the Cries of Widows and Orphans, and all on your Account, which makes it the more to be lamented.

Pardon, Sir, the Warmth of my Expression on this Argument; it is to prevent a Flame, which I seekindled in the midst of us, that may consume us to Ashes. The sum of the Progress of a Civil War, is the Rage Fire and Sword, and (which is worfe) of brutish Men: What the Issue of it will be, no Man can tell, probably some of us now here may live to see the End. It has been faid, He that draws his Sword againft his

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Prince,

Prince, must throw away his Scabbard : Those differences are scarce to be reconciled ; these Commotions are like the deep Seas, being once stirred, are not soon appeafed. I wish the Observation of the Duke of Roban, in his Interest of Christendom, may prove a Caution, not a Prophesie. He faith of England, That it is a great Creature, which cannot be destroy'd but by its own Hand. And there is not a more likely Hand, than that of Civil War to do it. The Iffue of all War is like a Cast at Dice, none can tell upon what Square the Alea Belli will light. The best Issue that can be expected of a Civil War, is, Vi&tor flet, Vistus perit ; which of these will be our Portion is uncertain, and the Choice would be avoided.

Yet, Sir, when I say this, I am not for a tame Resignation of our Religion, Lives and Liberties, into the Hands of our Adversaries, who seek to devour us. Nor do I think it inconsistent with your great Wisdom, to prepare for a just and necessary Defence of them. It was truly observed by a noble Gentleman, That if our Enemies find us provided to resist their Attempts upon us, it will be the likeliest way to bring them to an Accord with us. And upon this Ground, Iam for the Question. But I humbly move you to consider, Whether it be not yet too soon to come to it. We have tried by Proposals of Peace to his Majesty, and they have been

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rejected : Let us try yet again, and appoint a Committee, who may review our former Propositions : And where they find the Matter of them (as our Affairs now are) fit to be altered, that they present the Alterations to the House, and their Opinions; and that, as far as may stand with the Security of us and our Cause, we may yield our Endeavours to prevent the Miseries which look Back upon us, and to settle a good Accommodation, so that there may be no Strife between us and the other Party, for we are Brethren:

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The Lord WHAR TO N's Speech : Being an

Account of Edge-hill Fight, in 1642.

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Y Lórds, and you the Aldermen, and

the Commons of this City, in a Business

of this very great Consequence and Concernment, it was very well known to my Lord General, that you could not but be full of great Expectations ; and my Lord had, according to his Duty, taken Care for to give Information to the Parliament to those that had sent him, of what had proceeded : In the very next place, it was his particular Respect to this City, to my Lord-Mayor, the Aldermen, the Common-Council, and all

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the Commons of this City, that they might likewise be acquainted with the Success of that Business, towards which they themselves had been at so much Expences, and had Thewed so much Love and Kindness in all the Proceedings of this Business, for that purpose because that Letters might be uncertain, and might miscarry, there being great Interception of them, the Forces of the Armies being close together, my Lord thought fit to send Mr. Strode, a Member of the House of Commons, and my self, and certainly whatsoever shall be related by us to you, it will be good News, or else we should not willingly have undertaken the bringing of it; and for the Truth of it, though we already hear that there are those that have so much Malignity as to oppose it, yet the Certainty of it will clear it self; and therefore there shall need no Apologies to be made, but that which shall be said to you, shall be the Truth, and nothing but the Truth, in a very clear Way of Relation of what hath past.

Gentlemen, I shall open to you as near as I can, as it comes within my Memory, those Things of Circumstance which are worthy the taking notice of, one in the first place shall be, the Occasion why so many of the Forces were not then upon the Place, which yoù will find to be upon very good Ground and Reason, for the Preservation of the Countries that were behind, and of this City,

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which is the particular Thing in the Care, and now under the Diligence of my Lord General, to preserve. There was left at

Hereford, which lies upon the Confines of 1 Wales, a Regiment of Foot, under the Com

mand of my Lord of Stamford, and a 'Troop or two of Horse, that the Power of Wales might not fall in upon Glocestershire, and upon the River of Severn, and fo upon the West. There was likewise left at Worcester (which you all know how it is seated upon the River of Severn, and what Advantage it hath to intercept all Force that shall come from Shrewsbury down into the West) a Regiment of my Lord Saint John's, and Sir John Merrick's. There was for the safety of Coventry (for that was a Town it was. likely the King might have fallen upon ) the Regiment of my Lord Rochford, but it seems that his Excellence the Earl of Elex his Army did so quickly come up to the King's, that the King thought it no way fit or advantagious for him to spend any Time upon those Places, for certainly they would have very quickly been relieved, so that the King Nipc by Warwick and Coventry, which otherwise we conceive they were Towns he had as good an Eye upon as any other Towns in the whole Kingdom, excepting this. There was likewise occasion upon the suddenness of my Lord's March, two Regiments of Foot, one under the Command of a Gentleman you all

know,

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