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Remarks.

ADMISSION.

It is required by the laws, that every person proposing to become a Student in the University, should produce satisfactory testimonials of good moral character, be at least fourteen years of age, and sustain, before one or more of the Faculty, an approved examination in Common Arithmetic ; Elements of Algebra; Elements of Ancient and Modern Geography; English, Greek, and Latin Grammar; Jacob's Greek Reader; six books of Homer's Iliad; Andrew's Latin Reader; Sallust, or Cæsar's Commentaries ; Cicero's Select Orations; and Virgil ;-or what shall be deemed equivalent.

For admission to an advanced Class, a corresponding increase of age is required, and a thorough knowledge of all the studies that have been pursued by the students of the same Class.

Individuals may be permitted to pursue a partial course of study at the discretion of the Faculty, but such students may not be candidates for a degree. The requisites for admission to a partial course are the same as for the whole course, with the exception of those particular branches of study which it is proposed to omit.

If a student come from another College, he must present a certificate of regular dismission from the institution he has left, and sustain an examinatian in all studies or their equivalents--which have been pursued by the Class he proposes to enter.

Departments of Study and Text Books .

The Studies pursued and taught in the University, are divided into four departments, viz :

I. ENGLISH LITERATURE.

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III. MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL SCIENCES.
IV. POLITICAL, MORAL, AND INTELLECTUAL PHILOSOPHY.

I. The Department of ENGLISH LITERATURE comprises exercises in Rhetoric and Criticism, and Recitations and Lectures in the history and analysis of the English Language and Literature.

1. TEXT BOOKS IN RHETORIC AND ENGLISH LITERATURE.

Campbell's Rhetoric ; Quintilian ; Theremin on Eloquence ; Marsh's Lectures on English Language; Reed's English Literature; Goodrich's British Eloquence.

2. LECTURES.

On style and the early English Literature, by Prof. CLARK. II. The Department of LANGUAGES comprises Recitations, Lectures and subsidiary exercises in the Ancient and Modern Languages and Literature, and in Ancient History.

1. TEXT BOOKS IN GREEK,

N. B.—The Leipsic editions of the Greek and Latin classics are the standard Text Books. No editions containing notes are allowed in the Recitations.

Herodotus; Homer's Odyssey; Thucydides; Demosthenes; the Greek Dramatists; Plato ; Hahn's Greek Testament; Kuehner's Grammar; Arnold's Prose Composition.

2. TEXT BOOKS IN LATIN.

Livy ; Tacitus; Quintilian ; Horace, or Juvenal; the Medea of Seneca ; the Adelphi, or the Andria, of Terence; Cicero de Officiis, or Orator; Andrews and Stoddard's and Zumpt's Latin Grammars; Arnold's Prose Composition.

3. TEXT BOOKS IN ANCIENT HISTORY.

Smith's History of Greece; Liddell's History of Rome,

BOOKS OF REFERENCE.

Liddell and Scott's Greek Lexicon; Andrews' Latin Lexicon; Smith's Greek and Roman Antiquities and Classical Dictionary; Munk's Greek and Roman Metres; Doederlein's Latin Synonymes; Arnold's History of Rome.

4. LECTURES AND OCCASIONAL EXERCISES.

On Greek and Roman Literature, and on Archæology, by Profs. BUCKHAM and CLARK,

Private Classes may be formed, during the last three years of the College course, in Italian, Spanish, German, French, and Hebrew, under the general direction of the Professors of Languages.

III. The Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences comprises Recitations, Lectures, and Experiments in pure and mixed Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Geology, Physical Geography, and Vegetable and Animal Anatomy and Physiology.

1. TEXT BOOKS IN MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS.

Loomis' Algebra ; Loomis' Geometry; Loomis' Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Surveying, and Navigation ; Loomis' Analytical Geometry and Calculus; Peck's Mechanics; Jackson's Optics; Norton's Astronomy.

2. TEXT BOOKS AND BOOKS OF REFERENCE IN CHEMISTRY,

GEOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY.

Porter's Chemistry; Gregory's Handbook of Organic Chemistry; Dana's System of Mineralogy; Dana's Manual of Mineralogy; Phillips' Geology ; Lyell's Principles of Geology; Lyell's Elements

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of Geology; Whewell's History of the Inductive Sciences ; Gray's Lessons in Botany ; Gray's Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States ; Agassiz and Gould's Principles of Zoology ; Carpenter's Physiology; Owen's Lectures on Comparative Anatomy.

3. LECTURES AND EXPERIMENTAL ILLUSTRATIONS. On Optics, Electricity and Magnetism, Chemistry, Mineralogy, Geology and Physical Geography, by Prof. HUNGER FORD.

On Comparative Anatomy and Physiology, by Prof. MARSH.

IV. The Department of POLITICAL, MORAL and INTELLECTUAL PHILOSOPHY comprises Recitations and Lectures in Political Economy, the Principles and Forms of Government, Laws of Nature and of Nations, Art, Ethics, Natural Theology and Evidences of Revealed Religion, Logic and Metaphysics.

3. TEXT BOOKS.

Bascom's Political Economy; Kent's Commentaries ; Hickok’s Moral Science; Butler's Analogy; Paley's Evidences of Christianity; Marsh's Lectures on Psychology ; Thomson's Logic; Tappan's Logic; Walker's Edition of Reid on the Intellectual Powers.

BOOKS OF REFERENCE.

Hamilton's Philosophical Works; Stewart's Philosophy; Locke on the Human Understanding; Hickok's Empirical Psychology.

2. LECTURES AND DISCUSSIONS.

On Political Economy, and Moral and Political Philosophy, by the PRESIDENT.

On Psychology, Metaphysics, and Art, by Prof. TORREY.

Libraries and Collections.

1. The Library of the University contains about nine thousand volumes, selected with special reference to the several departments of Study, and is open to the Junior and Senior classes every Saturday—to the Sophomore and Freshmen classes every Wednesdayduring Term Time.

Persons not immediately connected with the University, may use the Library for consultation, by special license from the President.

2. The Libraries belonging to the Phi Sigma Nu and University Institute Societies, and to the Society for Religious Inquiry, contain together, from three to four thousand volumes, designed more particularly for the use of the members of these Societies.

3. The College of Natural History, of the University of Vermont, incorporated in 1826, has for its object, the acquisition and diffusion of knowledge in every department of Natural History, and the accumulation of all materials, natural and artificial, which will promote these ends. Its collections may be visited at all proper hours by applying for admission to the Curator.

Examinations.

The Students are examined at the close of each study, or particular branch of study, by two of the officers, appointed in each case by the Faculty, and their attainments marked and reported to the Faculty.

The students are also publicly examined, during the last two weeks of the Spring and of the Summer Terms, in all the studies which have been previously pursued by the class to which they respectively belong, and their attainments marked and recorded.

The results of this examination are publicly made known in the Chapel, and exhibited to the Corporation at Commencement.

ASSISTANCE TO INDIGENT STUDENTS. Several Scholarships have recently been founded, to assist indigent students to the amount of their tuition. The most deserving young men are appointed to these scholarships, upon proper recommendation, from year to year, by the Faculty.

The death of Dr. DANIEL WASHBURN, has rendered available, also, a part of the Washburn Fund for the gratuitous tuition of indigent young men preparing for the Christian Ministry.

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