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THE

11 FOURTH BOOK

FOR CHILDREN,

WITH NUMEROUS EXERCISES.

BY JOHN WHITE,
TEACHER OF ENGLISH, GEOGRAPHY, AND HISTORY,

North St, David Street, Edinburgh.

THIRD EDITION,

GREATLY IMPROVED AND ENLARGED.

EDINBURGH:

SOLD BY

WM. WHYTE & CO., OLIVER & BOYD, WM. WILSON
M. OGLE, GLASGOW ; JOHN SINCLAIR, DUMFRIES; JAMES
DEWAR, PERTH; A, BROWN & CO., ABERDEEN ; K. DOUGLAS,
INVERNESS; W. GRAPEL, LIVERPOOL; w. & W. CLARKE,

MANCHESTER; R, BURDEKIN, YORK; AND
SIMPKIN, MARSHALL,

&

CO., LONDON

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THE

FOURTH BOOK.

(See Directions.)

Rule taken mason aught rude spoken lesson eight true given person straight gru'-elfrozen reason plough ru'-in broken button taught mutton freight in-trude' raven tru'-ant cotton bough ripen.

EXERCISES.

The mason has taken the rude stone which lay here, and broken it to pie'-ces. He ap-plies' his rule to see if it is straight. Do not take aught that belongs to an'-y of these cru'-el boys ; for they will then have reason to fall out with us. They are sure to come to ru'-in ; for they waste and spoil ev'-er-y thing that is given to them. They do not learn their lessons, when in school, and they pre-vent ev'er-y person near them from lệarn'-ing. One of them tore a button off my coat, and next day he played the tru'-ant. When he was sick he got gru'-el to drink; and hiş pa-pa' gave him eight grapes, which he said would do him no harm, as he was much bet-ter. . When he was al-lowed to eat mutton he thought it ver'-y nice.

That man holds the plough in the fur’-row, and the hors'-es draw it a-long af'-ter them. There iş a raven fly'-ing a-cross the field : he is look’-ing for food. When the ground iş frozen hard, the plough can'-not be em-ployed; and when it is wet with rain or melt'-ed snow, no seed can be sõwn.

Some boys and girls are taught to spin cotton when they are ver'-y young. It is true they earn a small sum by it to help to sup-ply' them-selves with food, but their health is much hurt by so much con-fine'-ment.

Cotton iş got from a plant which grows and ripens in the fields. We will not in-trude' up-on' those men, who seem to be much en-gaged'. They are pre-pa'-ring these goods to freight a ship with.

EXCEPTIONS. Wom'-an doubt mon-ey al-wayş moth'-er fa'-ther broth'-er fruit saun'-tered bought half'-pen-ny received' threw trouble most al-most world.

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Tom Love'-book was a ver'-y clev'-er boy; he was ver-y, young his great at-ten-tion he soon be-came the head of hiş class. See, he is now go'-ing home af'-ter mor'ning school hours, his slate well filled with sumş. He is walk'-ing a-way' with-out' see'-ing that he is car’-ry-ing hiş bag turned up'-side down; his Lat-in book has fallen out, and that good old wom'-an iş go'-ing to pick it up and give it to him ; no doubt he will thank her ver'-y much, and give her a pen'ny for her painş. He is not so fool-ish as some boys I know, who spend all their mon'-ey in gin'ger-bread; for this reason he has al'-ways a pen'-ny at hand to give in char’-i-ty, or to re-ward' an'-y body who does him a kind'-ness.

EXERCISES.—What kind of a boy was Tom Lovebook? When did he go to school ? How did he become the head of his class ? How diđ he carry his bag? What is the old woman going to do? What will he give her for her pains ? What does he do with his money?

CIVIL FRANK.

Lit-tle Fran’-cis Brown was so well known for his civ'-il man'-ners and good con'-duct, that he was called Civ'-il Frank by all the vil’-la-gers.

He lived with his moth'-er in a lit-tle farm house; and it was his de-light', after feed-ing the pigs and poultry, and milk'-ing the cow, to go and sit on a stile and see the sun set, which he thought the fi'nest sight in the world. A gen'-tle-man one day passed by, as Fran’-cis was en-joy'-ing his eve'-ning treat, and was so struck with Civ'-il Frank's man'ner, that he went home with him to his moth'-er's cottage, and prom'-ised to send him ev'-er-y year a pres'-ent of books and mon'-ey.

EXERCISES.—Why was Francis Brown called Civil Frank ? Where did he live? What did he delight to do? What did he think the finest sight in the world? What did a gentleman promise to send him every year?

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