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body. Heal, to cure; Heel, of a shoe' or foot ; He'll, he will. Hear, to hearken; Here, in this place. Heard, did hear; Herd, of cattle. Hew, to cut; Hue, colour; Hugh, a man's name. Hie, to haste ; High, lofty. Higher, more high ; Hire, wages. Him, a person ; Hymn, a godly song. Hour, of the day; Our, our own. I'll, I will ; Aisle, of a church; Isle, an island. In, within ; Inn, a public house. Indite, to compose ; Indict, to impeach. Kill, to murder ; Kiln, to dro, malt in. Knap, to bite; Nap, a short sleep. Knuve, a rogue ; Nave, of a wheel or church. Knell, passing bell ; Nell, Eleanor. Knew, did know ; New, not worn or used. Knight, a title of honour ; Night, darkness. Knot, hard part in wood ; Not, denying. Know, to understand ; No, nay. Lade, to load ; Laid, placed. Leak, to run out ; Leek, a kind of onion. Lead, metal ; Led, conducted. Lesson, in reading : Lessen, to make less. Liar, a false story teller ; Lier, in wait ; Lyre, a harp. Limb, leg or arm ; Limn, to paint. Lo, behold; Low, mean, humble. Made, finished ; Maid, a virgin. Main, chief ; Mane, of a horse. Mail, armour ; Male, he or him. Mare, she of the horse ; Mayor, of a town. Marshal, head general ; Martial, warlike. Mean, of small value ; Mien, appearance. Meat, flesh; Meet, to come up to. Medlar, a fruit ; Meddler, a busy body. Mews, as a cat ; Muse, to think. Might, power; Mite, in

DIRECTIONS.

It may be necessary here to state, before proceeding to give directions, that the following rules do not apply universally ; but that they relate to certain words only, which, from their similarity, may be classed with propriety, and rules given for pronouncing them. Alugh some of such rules are directly contrary to those in the 'Txad Book, yet it is necessary to give them as rules, to avoid the immense number of exceptions that would otherwise occur in the lessons. When two rules may be applied to a word from the way in which it is spelled, the child is to be told the proper one for the par. ticular word, that he may give it the true pronunciation.

Page 3.—The class of words in this page is to be taught by certain rules, viz. that u after r sounds like oo; as in rule, which is pronounced as if spelled rool ; that e and o before n, in the last syllable of a word, are silent, and the n must be pronounced with the preceding syllable ; as, taken, mason, pronounced takn, masn ; that g and h are silent, and the double vowel pronounced as previously taught; as if aught, eight, were printed aut, eit, &c.

Page 4.-Words forming exceptions to the rules given in the author's elementary books are collected and placed before the lessons in which they occur, that the pupil may be made well acquainted with them, before proceeding to read the lessons.

Page 13.-The rules for pronouncing the words in this class, and those words that are spelled in a similar manner, are, that i before r and another consonant, has the shut sound of e, as in firm, it is pronounced as if spelling ferm ; that t between s and 1 is silent, and like. wise when between s and en, as in castle, listen, pronounced casi, lisn ; and that the double vowel ey, at the end of a word of more than one syllable, has the name sound of e, as in bar'-ley, which is pronounced as if spelled bar'-le.

ز

the water ; Weighed, in the balance. Wain, a cart or waggon ; Wane, to decrease. Wait, to tarry; Weight, for scales. Ware, merchandise ; Wear, to use. Way, road ; Weigh, to balance ; Wey, a weight. Week, seven days ; Weak, not strong. Wood, timber; Would, was willing. Won, did win ; One, in number.

ROMAN NUMERALS.

I.
if.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.

One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Şeven
Eight
Nine
Ten
Eleven
Twelve
Thirteen
Fourteen
Fifteen
Sixteen

XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.
XX.
XXX.
XL.
L.
LX.
LXX.
LXXX.
XC.
C.
CI.

Seventeen
Eighteen
Nineteen
Twenty
Thirty
Forty
Fifty
Sixty
Seventy
Eighty
Ninety
One hundred
One hundred

and one
Two hundred
Three hundred.

CC.
CCC., &c.

DIRECTIONS.

It may be necessary here to state, before proceeding to give directions, that the following rules do not apply universally; but that they relate to certain words only, which, from their similarity, may be classed with propriety, and rules given for pronouncing them. Although some of such rules are directly contrary to those in the Third Book, yet it is necessary to give them as rules, to avoid the immense number of exceptions that would otherwise occur in the lessons. When two rules may be applied to a word from the way in which it is spelled, the child is to be told the proper one for the particular word, that he may give it the true pronunciation.

Page 3.The class of words in this page is to be taught by certain rules, viz. that u after r sounds like 00; as in rule, which is pronounced as if spelled rool ; that e and o before n, in the last syllable of a word, are silent, and then must be pronounced with the preceding syllable ; as, taken, mason, pronounced takn, masn ; that g and h are silent, and the double vowel pronounced as previously taught; as if aught, eight, were printed aut, eit, &c.

Page 4.-Words forming exceptions to the rules given in the author's elementary books are collected and placed before the lessons in which they occur, that the pupil may be made well acquainted with them, before proceeding to read the lessons.

Page 13.-The rules for pronouncing the words in this class, and those words that are spelled in a similar manner, are, that i before r and another consonant, has the shut sound of e, as in firm, it is pronounced as if spelling ferm; that t between s and l is silent, and likewise when between s and en, as in castle, listen, pronounced cast, lisn; and that the double vowel ey, at the end of a word of more than one syllable, has the name sound of e, as in bar'-ley, which is pro. nounced as if spelled bar'-le.

the water ; Weighed, in the balance. Wain, a cart or waggon ; Wane, to decrease. Wait, to tarry; Weight, for scales. Ware, merchandise ; Wear, to use. Way, road ; Weigh, to balance ; Wey, a weight. Week, seven days ; Weak, not strong. Wood, timber ; Would, was willing. Won, did win ; One, in number.

ROMAN NUMERALS.

1.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.

One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Eight
Nine
Ten
Eleven
Twelve
Thirteen
Fourteen
Fifteen
Sixteen

XVII.
XVIII.
XIX.
XX.
XXX.
XL.
L.
LX.
LXX.
LXXX.
XC.
C.

Seventeen
Eighteen
Nineteen
Twenty
Thirty
Forty
Fifty
Sixty
Seventy
Eighty
Ninety
One hundred
One hundred

X.

and one
Two hundred
Three hundred.

XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.

CI.
CC.
CCC., &c.

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