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JEU D'ESPRIT. : I

[From the British Press, Aug. 6.]

CRI
RIES Tag to his friend, "Bob, were you at Old Drury,
Last night, when my Richard so charm'd all the crowd?
I hope you were there; but, if not, I assure ye,

Nor Kemble nor Cooke e'er got plaudits so loud :
You may smile-but 't is true-I had peal upon peal;
Such a flatt'ring reception was sure never seen."
"No doubt,” replied Bob, as he turn'd on his heel,
"But the peals must be orange peels, Tag, that you

mean.

A

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A GOOD LIAR.
[From the same, Aug. 12.]

THE HE minions of Ministers, foreseeing the fall of their patrons, and anxious to put off the evil day, wish to revive the old scheme of "a combined and extended Administration."-The scheme, as originally suggested by Mr. Perceval, they do not like to follow implicitly. From the popularity of the Regent, they think the addition of the Foxites will make them strong enough for any emergency, and therefore it is thought advisable to reject the Grenvilles.

That point being settled among the minions of Ministers, that all just and honourable means shall be employed to ensure its attainment,

It is, in the prosecution of this plan, necessary to show, that the Regent hates Lord Grenville mortally; and that no man bearing the name of Grenville, or directly or indirectly connected with that House, shall ever be honoured with the countenance of His Royal Highness.

A good, clever, plausible Liar, hard-mouthed, and gifted with a pleasant fancy, who has no objection to forward this loyal and patriotic object, is therefore wanted.

The following is a sample of the lies that will be required of any literary gentleman undertaking this

office:

"The Regent dined lately with Lord Grey, and His Lordship rebuked His Royal Highness pretty sharply for not having invited his friend Lord Grenville.-N. B. The Regent, whenever he accepts an invitation, always invites his own company.'

""

"It is a curious fact, that at a late interview at Carleton House, Lord Grenville proposed to the Regent, as a sine quâ non of his acceptance of office,

* Numberless articles, in our volumes will show that wits are not always prophets. EDIT.

that His Royal Highness must discharge his present bootmaker, and must buy his blacking at a new shop. -Will any man in his senses suppose that His Royal Highness will suffer himself to be thus dictated to by a subject, even though that subject be a Peer of the Realm ?"

The candidate for literary fame, it is hoped, will find nothing discouraging in these samples.-The Gentleman who has hitherto filled the situation with so much credit to himself, and advantage to his employers, is now at Boston, in North America, forging State Papers for the London Courier.-Any person who may answer this advertisement, will therefore be only wanted to furnish matter until that Gentleman's

return.

Application to be made to any of the Ministerial Printing Offices in the Strand.

IMPROMPTU.

[From the Morning Post, Aug. 13.]

A

WAG, who had recently taken a wife,

Was ask'd by a neighbour what caused their strife, As her beauty had been the sole cause of his liking? "Alas!" said the wag, "I have found her too striking!"

Gray's Inn, Aug. 7.

R. H.

ON A HASTY MARRIAGE BETWEEN A YOUNG LADY AND A FOP.

[From the Morning Chronicle, Aug. 14.]
BE
ELINDA, in her twentieth year,
Holds solitude such woe,
She'd rather lead a Monkey here
Than lead an Ape below.

A NEW

A NEW CHEVY CHASE,

ON A LATE MEETING, WHICH DID NOT AMOUNT TO

A DUEL.

[From the Morning Herald, Aug. 17,]

GOD prosper long our Regent Prince,
And eke his subjects true,

That when our noble youths do wince,
No bloodshed may ensue !

Two Knights, as Chronicles do tell,
Did woo one Fair La-dy,
And so to loggerheads they fell
In mortal Jealou-sy!

For she was rich in lands, 't is said,
And had of pelf galore;

So, for all this, no costly maid
Was e'er so lov'd before !

So desp'rate grew this doughty twain,
Men swore it, who had seen 'em,
Impossible there should remain

One throat uncut between 'em!

The one was Kill-worth's Lord, I trow, ́
To couch a lance right willing,
Who never turn'd his back to foe

He thought was worth the Kill-ing.

Well'sley the other, nickna-med
Great De la Pole also;

'Cause on his shoulders he'd a Head*,
And two light heels below.

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* A profound Etymologist has proposed to furnish us with a speculation upon the subject of what he calls transmutation of names; and we are sorry that we cannot afford him the sixteen columns which he kindly and modestly wishes to fill. We find, however, that he imputes many English surnames, which have the syllable Head in them, to that good old habit of patriotic katachresis, by which our ancestors endeavoured to read every language, as if it were English. Thus the dignified De la Pole of the Normans seemed to them to mean neither more nor less than Poll, and they thought themselves highly decorous when they turned this into Head,

Not

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