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272 SCHEME FOR PAYING THE NATIONAL debt.

a Foreign Prince *. While the Spanish Monarch Janguishes in captivity, his coins of silver, " that will abide the fire," have been elevated, and these meretricious beauties of which it complains have been permitted to come in, in increased numbers, in order that they may make the tokens stay.

Your Petitioner, therefore, as a subject of our Sovereign, demands equal justice; he prays to be delivered from the noxious embraces of Four-and-Twenty Protectors, who know not his worth, and, by permitting him to go alone while his family is not quite extinguished, he has well-founded hopes that he will keep his place among you, secure your liberties and properties, and, as his power increases, he will diminish the number of your and his enemies.

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By taking all these premises into your serious consideration, your humble Petitioner will ever pray, &c. &c.

[From the Morning Chronicle, July 6.]

SCHEME

FOR PAYING THE NATIONAL DEBT, AND SUPERSEDING THE NECESSITY OF TAXES.

[From the same, July 11.]

.14

1.

I PROPOSE, that an inquiry should be made into

the income of the Bank Directors.

2. Into the salaries paid the Clerks of every denomination connected with, as well as those in, the Bank employ.

Having so done, by way of complete satisfaction to all the parties concerned, I propose to double the amount of their incomes.

* Alluding to the notice from the Bank to take in Dollars, which were current at 5s., at 5s. 6d.

The

The ground being thus cleared, I propose an act should be passed, compelling all manner of persons to receive Bank notes at their denominated value. Then an act to take possession of the concerns of the Bank (to which no objection could be raised, all the parties being satisfied as above).

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Being thus legally in possession of the Paper Ma chine, I propose paying the National Debt, by giving to every one of the large Stock holders notes of 1000l. each, to the amount of their respective claims-after which I would in like manner proceed to pay the lesser

ones.

Now, Mr. Editor, you perceive, by only admitting that Paper is Money, how pleasant the office of State Minister will become, and in how little time the bur dens of the people may be taken from their shoulders. 7th July, 1811.

C.

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[From the Morning Herald, July 156]

THOUGH my feet caper'd first with the smart Emma

L-g,

My eyes danc'd in chase of her sister;

And salt tears never fail'd in their sockets to throng
Whene'er for a moment they miss'd her!

So bewitching her jewels-attractive her pelf,
Titled Lads throng in troops to ensnare her;
But, by J- -s! I vow, by my own precious self,
That a W-
-s-y shall win her, and wear her!

N 5

'Mid the tumult of waltzing, and wild Irish reels, As prime dancer I'm sure to get at her;

And by Love's graceful movements to trip up her heels,

1

As the Long and the short of the matter!

14140

Cocoa Tree, July 13.

MARGAZE

MARGATE, JULY 21.

A TOUCH OF THE MARvellous.
[From the same, July 23.]

LA AST Friday, as Mrs. Philpott's maitresse-femme was reclining upon the eastern cliff, to watch some linen that was placed there, like a Mussulman at Mecca, to be blanched and purified, she heard, or swears that she heard, a very animated colloquy between a Shirt, that belongs to an old Bachelor, who boards in Hawley Square, and a Chemise, which appertains to á maiden Lady of the same Table d'Hotesse. This event has caused as great a sensation here as the Cock Lane Ghost did in London, when credulity had even a broader establishment in the metropolis than in our times. Crowds arrive daily from Broadstairs, Kingsgate, and St. Peter's, to visit the miraculous spot, and gather evidence as to the fact. The following poetical chit-chat is said to contain the spirit of this wonder-inspiring dialogue. The merit of the versification is attributed to one of our celebrated M. C.'s; but whether it is the dancing bard of Margate, or his great compeer of Dandelion, is not as yet precisely ascertained, as they are " Arcades ambo," equally refined and erudite, and far above mortal parallel.

THE SHIRT AND CHEMISE.

"On affronte, pour vous, la mode et l'etiquette;
Le beau ton languit sans pouvoir;

Chacun deserte la toilette;

Et, seule, la Beauté s'endort dans le boudoir !"

Voyez D'USSIEUS,

To a Holland Chemise,

Quoth a Shirt (ill at ease),
On our cliffs, in the late stormy weather;

"Sweet

"Sweet wench, pr'ythee say,
Why as aliens we lay,

When we both might be happier together."

Said the Shift to the Shirt,
"A vile soap-tearing flirt

Spread me here, because she was the stronger
But may Atropos' knife

Cut the thread of my life,

If I'll bear this affront any longer.

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"Now, ye Gods! see a lass
Thus expos'd on the grass,
For the rabble to pass in rotation;
While Sol laughs from the sky,
Though I bawl out ' O fie!'
And am blushing like any carnation!

"Can the M. C. look on,
And see each day what's done?
Though this is no Brothel to sin in,
Yet coarse fellows, by squads,
Come and roll on these sods,

And, s'blood, some will handle my linen!

Hither, calm Hannah M.
Read your heart's dampers o'er,

Such as Ursula's self would call clever ;
Make their morals more nice,
Touch their pulses with ice,
And I'll pray for you ever and ever.

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N 6

"Lift me up from the dirt,"
Sobb'd the Shift to the Shirt,

"And don't let a poor Lady be penn'd on 't.

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Come and act like a man
"I'll be d--'d if I can,"

Said the Shirt, "Ma'am, and so there's an end on 't!"

EPIGRAM:

EPIGRAM.

[From the Morning Post, July 24.]

BURNING with rage, fierce Napoleon cries,
Cowardly thus to quit your post with shame:"
Humbled, the routed Massena replies,
"In Egypt, Emperor, you did the same."

IMPROMPTU

ON READING THE EXPOSE'.

[From the same.]

NAPOLEON still boasts that he'll drive us from Spain,

Aye, and Portugal too, if he can ;

That his thief-coupled conscripts shall cover the plain,
And France shall be drain'd to a man.

!

Let his bandcuff'd conscriptions come on, if they dare,
With another such neighbour to back 'em,"
They all shall be treated with Massena's fare,
And Wellington soundly shall thwack 'em.

t

PARODY

OF ODE XVI.-BOOK 111.-HORACE,

[From the Morning Chronicle, July 25.]

Inclusam Danaen.

WHI

HEN Danae's father smok'd old Jove's
Design upon his daughter,
He swore he 'd interrupt their loves,
And Jove should ne'er come at her.

In chamber dark, on attic floor,
To make all sure, he put her;
Secur'd with patent lock the door,
And double-barr'd the shutter.

2

The

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