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The enemy have fołłowed the Duke of Belluno, but with cavalry only. A light division of 1500 of the enemy's cavalry had taken a position at Rambervillers, General Briche sent one of his brigades of eavalry. Colonel Hoffmayer, of the 2d regiment of dragoons, turned the town on the 9th, and advanced on the road of Espinal, while General Montegier marched directly to Rambervillers, and penetrated into the town. The enemy's 1500 horse were broken every where. They attempted to rally at some distance, but were charged impetuously, broken, and pursued above two leagues, leaving many dead on the field of battie. Geoeral Đuhesme has fixed his headquarters at St. Xez. The Duke of Ragusa has taken a position on the Sarye. ‘Ā’ile motions of the coluons which have penetrated to Geneva are sivvy. The e-leiny are not at Bourg.

SPA ; N. JDowning street, Þec. 29, 1312. *Maior is li, Aide de Camp to Lieutenant-Gene at S:t owiat, d is ill, he's arrived with a dispatch, of which the fo!lowing is a copy, addressed to Earl Bathurst, by Field 31 rshal the Kiarquis of Wedington, K. G. dated St. Jo de floo, Doc. 14, 1813. My Loan,—once the enemy's retreat from the Niveole, they had occupied a position in focat of sayonne, which had been entreached with great labour since the battle fought at Vittoria, in June last, It was impossible to attack the enerny in this position, as loog as they remained in force in it. I had determined to pass the Nive inimediately after the passage of the Nive!!e. The enemy were immediately driven form the right bank of the river, and retired towards Bayonne, by the great road from St. Jean Pied de Port. These posted opposite Cambo were nearly interceptcd by the 6th division, and one regiment was driven from the road and obliged to march across the country. The enemy assembled in considerable force on a ange of heights running parallel with the Adour, and still keeping Ville Franche by their right. The 8th Portuguese regiment under Colonel Douglas, and the 9th Cacadores, under Colonei Brown, and the i3ritish light infantry battalions of the 6th division, carried the village and the heights in the neighbourhood. The rain which had failen the preceding night and on the morning of the 8th, had so destroyed the road, that the day had nearly elapsed before the whole of Sir Rowland Hill's corps had come up, and I was therefore satisfied with the possession of the ground which we occupied. Øn the same day, Lieutenant-General

Public Affairs in January.

[Feb. I, Sir John Hope, with the left of the army under his command, moved forward by the great road from St. Jean de Luz, towards Bayonne, and reconnoitred the right of the entrenched camp under Bayonne, and the course of the Adour below the town, after driving in the enemy's posts from the neighbourhood of Biaritz and Anglet. The right division under Major-General Alten, likewise moved forward from Bassusarry, and reconnoitred that part of the enemy's entrenchments. Sir John Hope and Major-General Alter retired in the evening to the ground they had before occupied. On the morning of the 10th, LieutenantGeneral Sir Rowland Hill found that the exteiny had retired from the positions which they had occupied the day before on the heights, into the entrenched camp on the side of the Nive; and he therefore occupied the position intended for him, with his tight towards the Adour, and his left to Visie Franche, and communicating with the centre of the army, under Marshal Sir William Beresford, by a bridge laid over the Nive; and the troops under the Mar shal were again drawn to the left of the Nive. General Morillo's division of Spanish infantry, which had remained with Sir Rowland Hill when the other Spanish troops went into cantonments, was placed at Urcuray, with Colones Vivian's brigade of light dragoons at Hasparren, in order to observe the movements of the enemy's division under General Paris, which upon the passage of the Nive had retired towards St. Palais. On the 10th, in the morning, the enemy moved out of the entrenched camp with their whole army, with the exception only of what occupied the works opposite to Sir Rowland Hill's position, and drove in the picquets of the light division, and of Sir John Hope's corps, and made a most desperate attack upon the post of the former at the chateau and church of Arcangues, and upon the advanced posts of the latter, on the high road from Bayonne to St. Jeau de Luz, near the Mayor's house of Blaritz. Both attacks were repulsed in the most gallant style by the troops, and Sir John Hope's corps took about five hundred prisoners. The brunt of the action with Sir John Hope's advanced post fell upon the 1st Portuguese brigade, under Brigadier-General A. Campbell, which were on duty, and upon Major-General Robinson's brigade of the 5th division, which moved mp to their support. Lieutenant-General Sir John Hope reports most favourably of the conduct of those, and of all the other troops engaged; and I had great satisfaction in finding that this attempt made by the enemy upon our left, in order to oblige us to draw in our right, was completely defeated by a couparatively Suail part of our force. I canhot I cannot sufficiently applaud the ability, coolness, and judgment of Lieutenant-Gemera! 3:r John Hope, who, with the general and staff officers under his command, shewed the troops an example of gallantry, which must have tended to produce the favourable result of the day. Sir John Hope received a severe conthsion, which, however, I am happy to say, has not deprived me for a moment of the benefit of his assistance. After the action was over, the regiments of Nassau aud Frankfort, under the conmand of Colonel Kruse, came over to the posts of Major-General Ross's brigade of the 4th division, which were formed for the support of the center. When the might closed, the enemy were still in large force in front of our posts, on the ground from which they had driven the picquets. They retired, however, during the night, from Lieutenant-General Sir John Hope's front, leaving small posts, which were immediately driven in. They still occupied, in force, the ridge on which the picquets of the light division had stood; and it was obvious that the whole army was still in front of our left ; and about three in the afternoon, they again drove in Lieutenant-General Sir John Hope's picquets, and attacked his posts. o were again repulsed with considerable 0SS. The attack was recommenced on the morning of the 12th, with the same want of success; the first division under MajorGeneral Howard, having relieved the 5th division; and the enemy discontinued in the afternoon, and retired early witt.in the entrenched camp on that night. They never renewed the attack on the posts of the light division after the 10th. Lieutenant-General Sir John Hope reports most favourably of the conduct of ail the officers and troops, particularly of the 1st Portuguese brigade, under BrigadierGeneral Archibald Campbel, and of MajorGeneral Robinson's, and Major-General Hay's brigade of the 5th division, under the command of the Hon. Colonel Greville. He mentions, particularly, Major-General Hay, commanding the 5th division, MajorGenerals Robinson and Bradford, BrigadierGeneral Campbell, Colonels De Regga and Grevilie, commanding the several hrsgades. Lieutenant-Colonel floyd, of the 84ta, who was unfortunately killed, LieutenantColonels Barnes, of the Royals, and Camerom of the 9th, Captain Ramsay of fire Royal Horse Artillery, Colouei De Lancy, Deputy Quarter-Master-General, and Lieu. tenant-Colonel M*Donald, Assistant-Adjutant-General, attached to Sir John Hope's corps, and the officers of his personal

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The 1st division under Major-General Howard, were not engaged until the 12th, when the enemy's attack was more feeble; Month LY MAs, No. 231,

but the guards cónducted themselves with their usual spirit. The enemy having thus failed in all their attacks with their whole force upon our left, withdrew into their intrenchments, on the night of the 12th, and passed a largé force through Bayonne, with which, on the morning of the 13th, they made a most desperate attack upon Lieutenant General Sir Rowland Hijl. In expectation of this attack, I had requested Marshal Sir W. Beresford to reinforce the Lieutenant-General with the 6th division, which crossed the Nive at dayJight on that morning ; and I further reinforced him by the 4th division, and two brigades of the 3d division. The expected arrival of the 6th division gave the Lieutenant-General great facility in making his movements; but the troops under his immediate command, had defeat. ed and repulsed the enemy with immense loss before their arrival; the principal attack having been made along the high. road, from Bayoume to St. Jean Pied de i’ort. Viajor-General Barnes's brigade of British infantry, and the 5th Portuguese brigade, inder Brigadier General Ains. worth, were particularly engaged in the contest with oe enemy on that point, and, those troops conducted themselves admirabiy. The Po to guese division of infantry, under the consu.old of Mariscal del Compo. }}on F. Le Cor, ...oved to their support on their left in a very gallant style, and re. gained an important position between these troops and fiajor-General Praisle's brigade, engaged with the ony in front of Visie Fisi.coe. I had great satisfaction also in observing the ce:13° of of General Byng's brigade of B; supported by the di Port

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unities the command of Brigadisor-Ge; Potochan, in carrying an important height. from the enemy on the right of our position, ...ad inai:;taining it agains: aii their efforts

to regain it. s Two guns and sooe prischers were taken from the enemy, who #eing beated at ałł points, and having suffered considerable loss, were oliged to retire upon their en

trenchment. It gives me the greatest satisfaction to have another opportunity of reporti.e. my sense of the merits and services of Lieutenant-General Sir Rowland fift upo, this occasion, as wełł as those of lieutenantGeneral Sir William Stewart, commanding the od division; Iajor-Genera's Pringic, £aries, and Byng; Marescal del Compo 1}on F. He Cor, and Brigadier-Generals Da Casta, Ashworth, and Išuchań. The British artillery under Licutenant-Coloneţ Ross, Aid the Portuguese artillery under Colonel Tulloch, distinguished themselves; and Lieutenant-General Sir Rowland iiili reports particularly the assistance he received from Lieutenant-Colonels Bouvrie 1. and *4. and Jackson, the Assistant-Adjutant and Assistant Quarter-Master General attached to his corps; Lieutenant-Colonel Goldfinch, of the Royal Engineers, and from the officers of his personal staff. The enemy marched a large body of cavalry across the bridge of the Adour yesterday evening, and retired their force opposite to Sir R. Hill this morning towards Bayonne. Throughout these various operations I have received every assistance from the Quarter-Master-General Major-General Sir George Miurray, and the Adjutant General Major-General Sir Edward Packenham, and 3.ieutenant Colonel i ord Fitz: oy Somerset, Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, and tile officers of my personal staff. \\ EI, LINGTON, MEM or Ax plot.—When Major Hill left the army, on the 18th instant, the right wing occupied a position between the Adour and the Nive, commanding the navigation of both the rivers; the centre to the left of the army, were posted between the Nive and the sea. Abstract of total loss of the army under the command of Field-Marshal the Marquis of Wellington, from the 9th to the 13th !}ecember, 1813, inclusive : Toial British toss, Killed.— 1 lieutenantolonel, 1 major, 3 captains, 10 lieutenants, 3 ensigns, 1 staff, 8 serjeants, 2 diummers, 250 rank and file, 14 horses. Total British Founded–2 general staff, 3 lieutenant-colonels, 6 majors, 30 captains, 67 lieutenants, 22 ensigns, 1 staff, 131 serjealots, 20 drummers, 1904 rank and file, 40 horses. Total British Missing–1 major, 1 captain, 3 lieutenants, 1 ensign, 1 staff, 10 serjeants, 3 druamers, 188 rank and tile, 1 horse. Total Požiugitose Killed—1 lieutenantcolonel, 2 majors, 6 captains, 3 lieutenants, 1 ensign, 7 serjeants, 2 diumulers, 330 rank and file, 1 horse. Total Portuguese sounded–2 general staff, 5 lieutenant-colonels, 8 majors, 34 captains, 22 lieutenants, 33 ensigns, 3 stafi, 84 serjeants, 5 drummers, 1488 rank and tile. Total Portuguese Missing—1 lieutenantcolonel, 1 major, 4 captains, 2 cnsigns, 4 serjeants, 3 drummers, 27.9 rank and sile. Total Spanish is illed—5 rank and file. Wounded—21 rank and file. Grand Total—is illed 650, - Wounded 3699,-Prisoners, 504. In all 5953, according to these returns. British Officers Killed. 9th December.—49nd regt. 1st. bat. Capíain George Stewart, Lieutenant James Stewart. 10th December.--9th regt, 1st bat, Lieutenant P. L. Lemesurier, Ensign George Rolton, o&4th regt, zud bat, Lieut.-Col. It,

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Public Affairs in January.

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The expectation that the Mexican pa

triots would succeed in establishing a free and independent republic in those fine provinces, is considerably abated by the intelligence, that General Toledo, at the head of the patriots, has been defeated by the royalists with the loss of two-thirds of his force. As the government of the United States, however, favor the cause of the patriots, their final success can scarcely be doubted; and we may thence conclude, that within twenty years, nearly the whole continent of America will be

covered with free republics. The London Gazette of December 21, contains dispatches from Sir George Prevost, respecting the repulse of the American force under General Hampton, consisting of upwards of 7000 men, with 10 field pieces, by 300 Canadian fencibles and militia,—an achievement which confers great honor on the Canadians. This check, by less than a twentieth part of his force, appears to have disconcerted the operations of Gen. Hampton, who, it appears by a dispatch from Sir George, dated the 4th ult, had quitted the lower province, and was retiring to Four Corners. With regard to the force under General Procter, it appears that this officer was so pressed by an overwhelming army, under the American General Harrison, that he was obliged to disperse his troops, consisting of only 450 regulars. He afterwards rallied them, and retired to Ancaster, on the Grand River, without being pursued; and with the scattered remains, about 200 men, he at length reached Burlington heights, the head quarters of Gen. Vincent. The Americats, however, were unable to profit by their success, and instead of advancing, retired to Sandwich, pursued by the Índians, who had been attached to Gen. Procter. The speech of Mr. Madison has arrived in London, and shall be given in our next. MONTHLY AP. CXXXVII. To amend the several Acts for regulating licences for the sale of spirituous liquors, wine, beer, ale, and cyder, by retail, in Ireland.—1. CXXXVIII. For the relief of insolvent debtors in Ireland.—7. CXXXIX. For exempting bankers and others from certain penalties contained in an Act of the last session of Parliament, for the further prevention of the counterfeiting of silver tokens issued by the governor and company of the bank of England, called dollars, and of silver pieces issued and circulated by the governor and company, called tokens, and for the further prevention of frauds practised by the imitation of the notes or bills of the said governor and company.—1. CXL. To amend an Act passed in the last session of Parliament, intituled, “An Act for the more effectual Regulation of Pilots, and of the Pilotage of Ships and Vessels on the coast of England,” and for the regulation of boatmen employed in supplying vessels with pilots sicensed under the said Act, so far as relates to the coast of Kent, within the limits of the Cinque Ports.-2, CXLI. To repeal an Act of the seventeenth year of the reign of his present Majesty, intituled, “An Act for registering the Grants of Life Annuities, and for the better Protection of Infants against such Grants,” and to substitute other provisions in lieu thereof—2. CXLII. To explain and amend several Acts relative to the land tax.—1. CXLIII. To direct the application of the sum of fifty thousand pounds, and of such further sums as may be granted for the benefit of the company of undertakers of the grand canal in Ireland.—2. CXLIV. To amend an Act of the Parliament of Ireland of the fortieth year of his present Majesty, for promoting inland navigation in Ireland.—4. CXLV. To amend the several Acts for régulating the distillation of spirits in Ireland.—2. CXLVI. To amend an Act made in the forty-fifth year of his present Majesty, intituled, “An Act to amend the Laws

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MONTHLY REGISTER OF THE PROGRESS OF ERITISH LEGISLATs ON.

- - -o&ENERAL TABLE of all the PUBLIC ACT's passed in the FIRST session of the Fifth PARLIAMENT of the UN i r of KING Dom –53 Goo. 11 r. or 1813. N.B. The figure after the title expresses the number of sheets of which the Act consists: and every sheet is sold for THREE PENCE.

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for improving and keeping in repair the post roads in reland, and for rendering the conveyance of letters by his majesty's post-office more secure and expeditious.”—1. CX}.VII. For the better securing the excise duties on spirits in Great Bri. tain, and for rectifying a mistake in an Act of the last session of Parliament, for granting certain duties on worts or wash made from sugar.—2. CXLVIII. To provide for the more effectually preventing the illicit distiliation of spirits in Ireland.—2. CXLIX. For the further support and maintenance of stipendiary curates.—3. CL. For the more speedy and effectual examination and audit of the accounts of military expenditure in Spain and Portugal, for removing delays in passing the public accounts, and for making new arrangements for conducting the business of the audit office.—1. CLI. For regulating the office of registrar of the high court of Admiralty and high court of appeals for prizes.—1. CLII. To continue, until the first day of January, one thousand eight hun dred and nineteen, an Act made in the fifty-first year of his present Majesty, to explain and amend the laws touching the elections of knights of the shire to serve, in Parliament for England, respecting the expences of hustings and poll clerks, so far as regards the city of WestminSter.—1. CLIII. To enable his Majesty to grant additional annuities to the judges of the courts in Westminster Hall, on their resignation of their offices.--1. CLIV. To render valid, and to authorize the payment, and granting of certain pensions at Kilmainham hospital; and to empower the commissioners of the said hospital to commute pensions for a sum of money in certain cases.—1. CLV. For continuing in the East India Company for a further term the possession of the British territories in India, together with certain exclusive privileges; for establishing further regulations for the government of the said territories, and the better administration of justice withL 2 in

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in the same; and for regulating the trade to and from the places within the limits of the said company’s charter, –14. CLVI. To provide for the payment of the charge of the annuities created in respect of the suia of six millions granted for the service of Ireland for the scar coe thousand eight hundred and thirteen.--!. ClMil. For granting the suit of fifty thousand pools to John A. oer, esq. in consideration of the public services performed by the said John Painer, in the improvement of the post-office revenue. — 1. CLVIII. For vesting in his Majesty certain parts of Windoor Forest, in the county of Berks, and for inclosing the open commonable lands within the said forest.--14. CLIX. To limit the responsibility of ship owners in certain cases.—2. CLX. To relieve persons who impugn the doctrine of the IIoly Trinity from certain penalties.—1. CLXI. For enabling his Majesty to raise the sum of five millions, for the storvice of Great Britain; and for applying the sum of two hundred thousand pounds British currency for the service of Ireland.-1. CLXII. To repeal a certain provision respecting persons convicted of felony without benefit of clergy, contained in an Act made in the fifty-second year of the reign of his present Majesty, for the erection of a Penitentiary House for the confinement of persons convicted within the city of London and county of Middlesex, and for making other provisions in lieu thereof. End of the general public Acts,

{For the purpose of conveying a distinct idea of the prodigious annual labours of the British parliament, in promoting the internal improvements of the country, we have determined to class the Local, ACTs, under the several heads of IMProve MENTs in Towns and Districts; *New or Improved Roads; cANALs, JBRIDGES ; Poort ; INCLosures; and 3DRAINAGEs. During the fast session only, above two hundred Acts of this description passed the legislature; and of course it is only in our power to give a list of them. Every British patriot must be gratified by its perusal, while he must regret that a legislature, which so judiciously and gloriously performs its duties to the country, when not misled by passion or party spirit, should be so deplorably misled in its views of general Policy, as to vote hundreds of millious,

Register of the Progress of British Legislation. (Feb. 1,

one aster another, to support a destructive system of ErekNAL warf ARE.] Locai, ; Air Rovem. ENTs. An Act for in proving Kilmaruock.--2. For supplying with water the towns of Mianchester and Salford.—2. for the unprovement of the harbour of Leith.-1. For constructing a harbour at Porthleven, in: Mount's Bay.—1, For op; owing the pier and port of Hartlepool.-2. For paving, &c. certain parts of Piccadilly and Park-lane, co. Middlesex.-5. For pavio, certain streets, &c. on certain pieces of ground belonging to his majesty, in Saint Mary-le-Bone and Saint Pancras, co. Middlesex, called Mary-leBone Park. --7. For reviving an Act for the better regulation of the butter trade of the city of Cork.-1. For regulating Coveat Garden Market, –2. - For widoning and improving Upper East Smithfield.-1. For erecting a new gaol for the county and city of Edinburgh.--5. For making an equal county rate for the county of Oxford.—2. For amending and extending the powers of the commission of sewers for the limits extending from East Mouldsey, in Surrey, to Ravensborne, in Kent.—4. For more effectually paving, lighting, &c. the town of Margate, co. Kent.—5. For paving, lighting, &c. the streets, &c. in Kidderminster, co. Worcester. -11. For paving, lighting, &c. the hamlet of Poplar and Blackwall, co. Middlesex; and for the better relief of the poor of the said hanlet.—9. For building a chapel of ease for Clapham, co. Surrey.—2. For the more equal assessment of money presented to be raised by the grand jury of the county of the city of Cork ; and for other purposes.—4. For erecting a church in the township of Everton, co. Lancaster.—4. For establishing the market, and for enlarging the market place at Hanley, co, Stafford.-9. For erecting a new gaol for the county and city of Perth, 2. * For paving the town of Warrington, co, Lancaster, and for building a new brides well in the said town.—11. For better supplying the town and párt of Liverpool with water—5.

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