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The Custom House which was erected in 1718 being altogether inadequate to the increased trade of the Port of London, the wharfs and warehouses to the westward of it, between Thames-street and the Thames, have been purchased and pulled down, and the building, of which we here present the design of the princial front, is to be erected on the scite. he architect is Mr. DAv1D LAING, and this front possesses a degree of taste too evident to require our praise. The builder is Mr. PETo. The length will be nearly double that of the old Custom House, being 490 feet, and the width 108 feet. It is calculated to admit the disposition of 650 officers and clerks, and the employment, without confusion, of 1050 tide*aiters, and other assistants. The

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This prison, which is built for the pur. pose of distinguishing the confinement of debtors from that of criminals, in the crowded criminal prisons of Newgate and the Compters, had its origin in the observations published by Sir Richard Phillips in his Letter to the Livery of London, (pp. 90-92,) which were ably and honestly supported by a committee of the corporation of London, appointed to report on them. The first stone was laid by Ald. Wood in July 1813, and the part intended for city debtors is nearly finished for their reception. It is to be regretted that the high price of ground tao much limited the areas for exer

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THE DEBTORS' PRISON, CRIPPLEGATE.

roM HOUSE.

ground floor and cellars are to consist of vaults and warehouses for goods under bond; and in the centre of the first floor will be the long-room, 190 feet by 67, surmounted by an elegant dome. The water front here represented is to be of stone, with Ionic columns at each end, and a double flight of steps at the principal entrance in the centre. The quay is to be extended in front into the river, and a new wall and quay are to be formed from the Tower to Billingsgate. Other improvements are also proposed in the access to this busy spot. At present the excavations for the sewers and foundations present an extraordinary picture of human industry, and bring to light foundations of former wharfs, sewers, and pavements of streets, 1000 years old.

cise, and that there is at present no entrance from Red-Cross-street for the city side, which is kept distinct from the county side, the only entrance being a common and remote one from WhiteCross-street. The accommodations will however far exceed those initherto possessed by this unhappy class of persons, while the scite, being little more than a quarter of a mile from St. Paul’s, does not remove the incarcerated from the vortex of humanity, and the attention of their friends. The architect is Mr. MonTAGUE, the city surveyor, and the building and ground will cost not less than

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4 ) THE NEW BETH.EM HOSPITAL.

If the asylum of St. Luke's has by its imagnitude and arrangements astonished all beholders, much more will the erection of this vast and splendid pile of buildings, serve as an honour to the taste and inoral feelings of the British nation.

The old hospital of Bethlem, or Bedlam, in Moorfields, having become rui'uous and dangerous in several parts, and also unequal to the number of cases which have required relief, it was determined to appropriate its scite to more profitable buildings, and to rebuild where ground was less costly, and more room attainable. Accordingly the present

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TIID ROYAL MILITARY ASYLUM.

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education of the boys is chiefly of a mi. litary character, the instructors bearing the titles of Serjeant-Major, SerjeantAssistants, &c.

The scite of the building is opposite the north-east corner of the enclosure of Chelsea Hospital, and the whole structure and its appurtenances accord with the liberal spirit in which the British parliament has, of late years, granted the public money for military purposes. As far as it provides for the education and maintenance of children, otherwise destitute, whose killed or maimed parents have claims on the gratitude of the government, it must have the heartfelt approbation of every Englishman and father of a family.

THE

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The design of a building of this nature, for the punishment, employment, and reformation of offences of secondary turpitude, usually punished by transportation for a term of years, has been conceived since the disputes began which terminated in the separation of the American States. The plan for colonizing New South Wales, led to a general system of expatriation to the Antipodes; which, as applied to definite periods, was CRUEL and unjust, because the wretched objects were precluded from the power of ever returning, however short might be the intended period of their punishment! A strong and affecting memorial of the sheriffs of London, in 1807, (vide Letter to the Livery, page 110,) led to several parliamentary notices and remonstrances against this indiscriminate mode of transportation, which was in all cases, in effect for life; and in consequence, this place r

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*...* In our next we propose to introduce the Naw Mint, the Commercial Hall, the Auctions Asart, the Royal Military College at Blackwater, the London Museum, and one or two

other objects.

We shall then gibe a succession of fine buildings, lately erected or in contempla

tion, at Edinburgh, Dublin, Glasgow, Liverpool, Manchester, Bristol, Portsmouth, Ply

amouth, &c. &c. for all which, we earnestly solicit the communications of drawings and de

scriptions as soon as may be convenient, from friendly and public-spirited correspondents. *o

To the Editor of the Monthly Magazine. SI R, *. HIE following essay was read before the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society in January 1811, immediately after the close of Monsieur Gregory Von Feinagle’s lectures on the Art of Memory, (who was present). As it has not yet been published; if you think it worthy a place in the Monthly Magazine, it is at your service. Thom(As JARRold, M.D.

On the Art of Memory.

Memory is to the old man what anticipation is to the young ; it places him where he would be, and feasts his imagination on nature's best gifts; it imparts to the withered countenance a glow of animation; it directs the mind as sight directs the body. If there be no memory there is no judgment; the absence of memory is idiotism. But memory is not characteristic of man, brutes possess and enjoy the faculty. A dog set at liberty seeks his master, it therefore must remember him. A flock of rooks are guarded by a centinel; they must recollect past dangers, and anticipate some in future. Anticipation arises out of memory. But I am not designing to degrade man by thus speaking of animals. The inemory of man is connected with his judo-went; the memory of brutes with their, ; , ions. Memory in man lessens his passions, because his judgment corrects them; but memory in brutes heightens theirs. Animals are trained and domesticated by the connection between memory and passion; a vicious horse throws a timid rider, but carries the erson it fears. It would be an easy and peasant task to trace the difference between the operation in man and in anio als, but more inportant considerations art before us.

The memory of man, like his senses, is capable of improvement, its capacity may be so enlarged as to eunbrace a multitude

of subjects, and to hold the particulars of each at command; indeed the great business of education in our early years is to correct the disposition and improve the memory. Dr. Priestley seems to have been of opinion that the memory may be improved up to the age of 40; after that period, he says, “if we gain one fact we lose the recollection of another.” How far it is desirable to pay particular attention to the cultivation of the memory, when the years of childhood are past, is a subject worthy of consideration, but which has not met with proportionate attention. Before the art of writing was invented, a good memory was of inestimably greater importance, and held in higher honour, than at the present day. The persons of the British bards were sacred, because to them were committed the archives of their country, and the depository was their memory; there they stored the history of their nation, and made use of poetry as their system of mncmonics. The Egyptian priests, for the same purpose, made use of hieroglyphics, the art of which they taught the Jews, who practised it in their journey through the wilderness. Some rude nations assist their memories by forming mounds of earth, and heaping together masses of stone; others by cutting notches in trees, or by strings of shells, or the seeds of piants; every age is desirous that its deeds shall not be forgotten, and if the art of writing be unknown memory alone can preserve them. To tear off the hair, to amputate a finger, to lacerate the body are mementos of personal calamities, which die when the event ceases to interest. As soon as the age of barbarism is past, and the art of writing is made known to a people, their deeds are placed beyond the reach of further error, when the sacredness of the bard, and the expounder of hieroglyphics, ceases. A good memory has however many admirers, and vatløtia

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