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270 Åsarriages and Deaths in and near London. [April 1,

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After having passed his grand climacteric with iess visitation from indisposition of mind or body than happens to mankind in general, at his house in Owen's-row, Islington, Juhn Beardmore, esq. formerly of the great porter, brewing firm of Calvert an Co. in Red Cross-street, London. He was born in dependent circumstances, and of honbie parentage, in the country. The theatre of life was his school and university; and, in it, he passed through all his degrees with increasing honours. For mary years after his residence in London he acted as a clerk in the brewery in which he finally became a partner. When it was decimed progrio transfer the concern from Roi Cross-street, and to consolidate it with that in Campion-lane, Upper Thames-street, Mr. B. withdrew himself entirely from business, and retired to Islington. Mr. B. possessed a memory richly stored with pleasant anecdotes, Sprightly remarks, and useful information on a vast variety of topics, derived not from books, but from living studies. From the aqur, in which he quitted business, he grew insensibly more and more the victim of Histlessness and enhui. With high amirual spirits—with a mind still active, and a body still robust—with confirmed health, independent property, an amiable wife, itunjerous friends, a plentiful table, and a social neighbourhood, Mr. B. was no lourer ‘al home,’ as it were, in his owniigise. The main-spring of action was new stopped. In all his pleasures, in all his engagements, for the day, for the week, or for the month, he was conscious gf & cactum. Want of customary application brougit on relaxation of activity; want of excrcise, languor of body, and depression of spirits; a train of evils ensued, cómprising loss of appetite, nervous affections, debility,inental and corporeal—decay,pain,

agg death. • Aged 55, Anne Susanna, wife of Mr. d Tiriselton, of Goodge-street, bookseller,

leaving one daughter and five sons to de-
plore her loss.
At Cole Harbour, the Right Hon. Lady
1. Taylor, wife of T. T. esq., comptroller-
general of the Customs. Lady L.T. was
the youngest daughter of Earl Stanhope,
by Eady H. Pitt, and niece of the
of Chatham and the late Mr. Pitt. ...
i.as left seven children to lament the is
parable loss of a tender and affectionate
13.0%ilt:1'. :* -
At Walworth, 80, Mrs. E. Taylor. ** -
At Carshalion, 83, Mrs. Margaret#ogo. - -
widow of the late A. H. of Winchester:
Street. # -
... At Brompton, Frances, relict of the late
E. Codd, esq. of Woodham Mortimer Hall,
Essex. - o
At a very advanced age, at Minterne -
Magna, in the county of Dorset, Richa, o,

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1814.] Deaths in and near London, and of Public Characters.

Digby, esq. Admiral of the Red, and uncle to the Right Hon. the Earl of oighy. Under this admiral the IDuke of Clarence entered the navy. In Park-place, Lady of try Markham, the lady of the Hon. Osborn M. Hier ladyship was daughter to the late, and sister to the present Marquis of Rath. . At Woolwich, 77, Lieuterar’-Coţoral IIuddlestone, Colonel-com”andant go the 5th battalion of the royal regiment of artillery. He had been fifty-seven years an officer of artillery, during which time he had been employed in many active anti arduous services in Anjerica, the West Indies, Holland, France, &c. &c. Amongst other honourable duties in which he had been engaged, was that of supporting the brave General Wolfe, at Louisburgh. He was an upright, a virtuous, and a religious man; a most zealous and an excellent officer. His death will be song and deeply lamented by his family and an extensive circle of friends. ' The general was descended from the ancient family of Huddlestone, of Salston-hall, in Cambridgeshire. Mr. Weston, a respectable farmer of Uxbridge: in coming to town on the outside of the coach lately, he walked up Notting-hill with the rest of the passengers, and seemed in perfect health; biot, on the arrival of the coach at the office at the corner of Pak-street, Oxford-road, he was taken down stiff and dead, to the astonishment of his fellow-passengers, who had mot the least suspicion of his inaitimate state. Cicut.-Gen. Sir C. Ross, bart. Colonel of the 37th regiment. At Walton-on-Thames, 00, Mrs. Reticsworth, relict of C. B. esq. late of Portseahouse, At Battersea, 66, J. Bell, esq. In an obscure lodging, at Pimlico, -— Wright, esq. son of Sir Maitin W. of the Exchequer, and long well-known for wealth, his deafness, and his eccentricities. During his last illness he sent for the rector of St. Martin's parish to pray to him, and a few days afterwards Mr. Wright’s solicitor called on the rector, to whom he was previously an utter stranger, to inform him that Mr. W. was dead, and had made a codicil to his will, wherein he had left him 1000l.; to MIr, Abbott, the Speaker of the *House of Commons, 7000l. to the Lord Chancellor, 4000l.; to Lord Sidmouth, 4000l.; and all his personal property and estates, to Lady Frances Bruce Brudenall, daughter of the Earl of Aylesbury, and Lady of Sir H. Wilson, of Chelsea Park. Upon the rector's going to Lord Aylesbury's to inform her ladyship, he found that she was married to Sir H. Wilson, and lady Frances, when informed of it, said

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272 and not two minutes before his death had offered to back certain Huntingdom birds for ten guineas. He was observed to lean iiis head forward, and made a kind of moan, when instantly his colour changed, and he was a corpse. Major-General John Francis Kelly, colonel in the 1st regiment of foot guards. He cutered the guards at a very early period. in 1795, he served under his Royal Highness the Duke of York in Flanders, and at the attack of Dunkirk. In 1798, he accompanied his regiment in the expedition against Ostend and Holland, under General 3Burrard and Sir E. Coote. In 1809 he served tonder Sir John Moore in Spain, and in the year following he was with the army in Walcheren. His death was acceHerated by his exertions to save his sister at the late fire at the Custom-house. Much regretted, Miss Ann Halley, of JHammersmith. In the 59th year of his age, the Rev. John Bidlake, D. D. of Christ Church, Oxford, chaplain to their Royal Highnesses the Prince Regent and the Duke of Clarence. He was a mative of Plymouth, and formerly master of the grammar-school in that town. He sustained, with great patience, for the last three years of his dife, that most afflicting calamity, a total deprivation of sight, accompanied with many bodily infirmities. During this dark and distressing part of his existence, he had all the endearing consolations that friendship could suggest, and all the kind alleviations that relatives could bestow. He was strict in his religious principles, but not intolerant; devoted to the churchestablishment, but without preferment; he possessed all the tender charities of the heart, and in the duties of a son he was truly exemplary. Dr. Bidlake was a man of unassuming manners; naturally commumicative among this intimate friends, by whom he was beloved and respected; patient under injuries; and of a sedate temper, even from his earliest years. One of the striking features of his character was the deep interest he felt in discovering young men of talent and modesty, and in patronising them as far as his limits would admit. Through the whole tenor of his , life he was just and honourable; prudent in his domestic concerns, but not niggardly; liberal in the acquisition of the works of taste, but not expensive. As an author he was instructive, elegant, and pathetic ; as a reacher, oncombarrassed, persuasive, and }. he had an unaffected and lively sense of the beauties of hature,and a genuine relish for poetry, painting, and music, in all of which he was conversant; but poetry was his favourite art. In a word, his mind

Deaths in and near London,and of Public Characters. [April 1,

was enriched with various knowledge; and had he concentrated the brilliant rays of his powerful intellect, he might have shone amongst the greatestmen of his age. At Brasted Place, Kent, the Rev. W. Peters, a very eminent and ingenious painter, whose Resurrection of a Family, Spirit of a Child, and other pieces, will live for ever among the choice works of British art. At Hammersmith, 70, Thomas Wetherall, esq. formerly a carpenter in Little Britain, and afterwards a jeweller in Cheapside, from which business he had for some years past retired to Hammersmith, where he filled the office of Commissioner of Income, Justice of the Peace, &c. In Jermyn-street, without any previous indisposition, 76, the Dowager Countess of Spencer, mother of Earl Spencer, the late Duchess of Devonshire and Lady Besborough, She was a most intelligent and amiable woman, and communicated to her children that passion for literature and the arts, which has raised them so high in the estimation of the world. She was the daughter of Stephen Pointz, esq. of Midgham House, Berks, and was married to the late Lord Spencer in 1755. In Oxford-street, aged 74, Mr. Thomas Reynolds, many years a respectable bookseller, and formerly in partnership with Mr. Shepperton. In Grosvenor-place, the much beloved Duchess Dowager of Leinster. At Clapham, Mrs. Brogden, mother of James Brogden, esq. M. P. for Launceston, and one of the Lords of the Treasury. Although in her 80th year, she retained the full vigour of her intellects till the period of her decease. . - : In Giltspur-street, , 63, Luke Hodson, surgeon, formerly of the Common Councii of London, and the first man who, first at the Common Hall, and afterwards at the Common Council, in 1795, raised his voice against the folly and wickedness of the late war. His attention to politics led to his failure in business, and he has latterly subsisted chiefly on the stipend paid by the City to the surgeon of the Compters and Ludgate prisons, in which situation he conducted himself with great humanity. In Gower-street, Mrs. Hughes, relict of the late Admiral Robert Hughes. *: In Privy Garden, 71, the Right Hon. A. Bennett. Mrs. Herries, the lady of Colonel Her. rics, in Cadogam-place. ** : * : James Barclay, esq. assistant secretary to the commissioners of the Property Tax for the City of London. - *h Miss Madden, of Cole Hill House, Ful. Alll, . . .

PRovincial

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PROVINCIAL OCCURRENCES,

WITH ALL THE MARRIAGES AND DEATHS.

worthum BERLAND AND DURHAM. HE new steam vessel, lately built on the south shore, near this town, has been launched into the river, and called the Tyne Steam Boat. Married.] At the Friends' Meeting-house, North Shields, Mr. Henry Walker, to Isabella, second daughter of the late Mr. Joseph Saunderson. Mr. George Apedaile, son of Wm. A. esq. of Gateshead, to the daughter of Mr. Thomas Hutchinson, of North Shields.John Parker, esq. to Mary, youngest daughter of the late Mr. Joseph Crawford.— Mr. Wm. Dunlop, merchant, Newcastle, to Mrs. Wilson, of Strawberry-place.— Mr. J.T. Brockett, solicitor, to Miss Bell, daughter of Mr. B. merchant, Newcastle. Died.] At Newcastle, 19, Mrs. M. A. • Blackett.—In Back-lane, Mrs. Blackburn. –20, Miss Wilson.—69, Mrs. Ann Saunders, of Gateshead.—89, Mrs. Dinah Oliver.-41, Mr. W. Hewison, of the Forth.Mr. George Anderson, late grocer.—103, Mrs. Mary Taylor, of Pilgrim-street: she walked about on the day of her death, and possessed all her faculties.—Suddenly, Mr. W. Glubb, spirit merchant.—Mr. Shallet Dale, of Saville-row. At the Deanery, Chester-le-street, 76, John Hudson, esq.-At Thropton, 79, Mr. John Snowdom.—At Seaham Grange, 66, the wife of Mr. Jolm Elliot, of Newbottle. }. At South Shields, 42, the wife of Capt. Middleton. — At Tynemouth, 26, Mary, daughter of Mr. Francis Simpson. — At Swinton, 52, the Rev. James Baird.--At Pelton, 21, William, son of Mr. John Weddle.—80, Mrs. Eliz. Hall, of Shieldhill. At Alnwick, Mrs. and Miss Morton.— Barbara Strother, sister of the late Thomas S. esq.—41, the wife of Mr. Bolton.—55, . Mr. Stanton Neale.—24, the widow of Mr. Joseph Friar.—94, Mr. John Maim.—20, . Mrs. Purvis.-23, the wife of Mr. John Dodds.-Suddenly, 17, Hamilton, son of Mr. Woodhouse, plumber.—The widow of Mr. George Hogg–71, George Kirk, 36 years porter at Alnwick Castle, and was several years serjeant-major of the 5th re.giment of foot, in which he was severely wounded at Bunker's-hill. At Sunderland, 63, Capt. Byers, 69, Capt. M. Parker. — Mrs. Dobbing.—76, Mrs. M. Cloud.—46, Mrs. Jane Mitchell. --Mrs. Marg. Nattrass.--Capt. W. Robin

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long life was spent in the faithful discharge of every social and religious duty. His memory will be long revered by all who were acquainted with his worth.-69, Mr. W. Young,..—70, Mrs. Laidman. At Crookham, 87, Mrs. Wilson, formerly of Weetwood.—At Polam Farm, 110, John Yarrow, a native of Mason Dinnington; he was servant to a farmer mear North Shields in 1715, and remembered assisting at the plough when the constables demanded the horses to convey military stores, in the rebellion. He was able last summer to cut turf in a field, as well as to attend to many domestic and rural occupations. His diet principally consisted of bread, milk, and cheese-At the West Boat, near Hexham, 53, Miss Susannah Gibson.—At Barnardcastle, 80, Mrs. Hanby, a maiden lady.— At East Ord, Isabella Laidler. She had been tapped for the dropsy 20 times within the last two years, and on an average upwards of 20 quarts of water extracted each time.-At Shadforth, near Durham, 74, Mrs. Jane Furmeis.—At IBelford, Mrs. Dixon, relict of Abraham D. esq.-At Low Elswick, 60, Mr. T. Littlefare. Much regletted, Mr. Tho. Laverick, of Painshaw colliery, agent to the late Sir H. W. Teimpest, bart.-At Alemouth, Miss Fenwick, daughter of the late Mr. F. of Widdrington. —The wife of John Elliot, esq. of Newbottle.—At North Shields, isabella, wife of Mr. W. Saunders. CUMBERLAND AND WEST MORELANI). Married.] At Workington, Captain E. Merrimam, to Miss Ben. At Brigham, Professor Jas. Hamilton, jun. M.D. president of the Royal College of Physicians, to Mary Anne, youngest daughter of James Claike Sattérthwaite, esq. of Cockermouth. Mr. James Blenkarn, of Bird's Park, to Miss E. Speight, of Kendal Parks. Mr. Ward, of Low Blcze, to Miss Crewdson, of Ridding Side. Mr. John Watson, of Fankin-How, to Miss Lowden, of Ussiker. At Ulverston, Mr. Dixon, to Miss Muncaster. At Workington, David Fletcher, esq. to Miss Jane Thompson. Dict!..] At Kendall, Mors. Braithwaite.— Mr. Thomas Hutton, deputy ballisi.-40, Mr. J. Waller.—Suddenly, Rachael Smith, S. F. of London, a woman of lare excelłence.— Mrs. Hallinead. 76, Miss Sarah Nicholson.—23, Mr. John Read. At Penrith, 83, Mr. Isaac Simpson.—82, Mrs. Margaret Aiken.—51, Mr. Hobert Simpson.--07, Mrs. M. Hodgson, of Woodhead.—21, Mrs. M. Rudd.-78, Mirs. C. Jackson. At

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I or kshire.

[April 1, at Leeds for a st:bscription for the relief and instruction of the destitute and uninformed in (; 3 NAI, A, where he states that three-fourths of the people are ignorunt of their letters. A fire was discovered at three in the morning in a large pile of buildings, the property of the Box, ager Lady [binetson, in the 'Fashot fun yard, Halifax. The whole pole, which contaired two wool warehouses, weepiod by Mr. Hawkes and Mr. Thwaite, and the sch931 for pcor boys and giris, on Dr. Beli's plan, was in a very short time bornt to the groupa. At a general meeting of the mail masters a.o. tigii makers, in Horsley Woodhouse, it was agreed that no lad shall learn the trade of making nails, ui:::ss he be bound by a legal indenture for the term of seven years; and every one who attempts to learn shall be bound, or give up the trade when he has been two nionths on trial ; and that no boy who is now learning, and has not been more than twelve megths at the trade, shall contiate to learn, unless he be legally bound fer seven years; and the masters hereby agree not to employ any hands who have not served a legal apprenticeship. A hon rid mu; der was committed near Hułł about half-past ten o'clock on the night of the 3d. As Mr. John Taylor, of Sntion, was returning home from Hull, he was passed on the foot path about twothirds of the way to Sutton, by a man, who, without speaking, turned about and fired a pisto!, the boil from which entered his icft breast. The villain then demanded his money, and a struggie took place, but Mr. T. gi owing faitt, the villain robbed him of between twenty and thirty guineas in notes, and about thirty shillings in silver. From sonse circumstances, a coal-man of the name of Forbes, living in Wincolmlee, was taken up on suspicion. Cn Saturday he was taken to Sutton, and identified by Mr. Taylor, when he was fully committed for trial to York castle. Mr. T. is since dead! About three o'clock on the morning of the 3d ifistant, the jarge scribbling mill belonging to Messrs. B. and W. Hallas, of Ossett, near Wakefield, was burnt to the ground. The less is supposed to be little short of ten thousand pounds. Married.] Mr. W. Wilks, of York, to Miss Susannah Weatheriil, of Leeds. At Wakefield, the Rev. J. Taylor, M.A. of Horbury, Justice of the Peace for the West Riding, to Miss Ramsden, of Wakefield. Mr. C. Norton, of London, to Miss Sarah Maw, sister to Mr. Maw, of Doncaster, attorney-at-law. . . Mr. J. Ferraby, to Caroline, younges daughter of the late Mr. Edward Lake, o Hull. At Beverley, John Arthur Worsop, esq. to Mrs. Dodsworth, - * * Mr. Wia, Skinn, of Pocklington, to Miss Mary

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