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Miss E. Boghurst.

Richard Harrison, csq. of Sandwich, to Miss Curling, of St. Peter's. The Rev. W. Williamson, to Miss Sarah Friend, of Brook's End. David Wood, esq. to Miss Ramsden, of Canterbury. W. H. Baldock, esq. of Petham, to Miss E. Delmar, of Canterbary. Captain Forbes, 55th, to Miss E. A. §ayer, of Dover. John Russell, esq. of New Romney, to Miss Sarah Harrison, of Chiddle Park. Mr. Charles Stephewson, of Maidstone, to Miss A. M. Richardson, of Reed Court. Captain Kains, R. N. to Miss Gould, of Rochester. Died.] At Canterbury, 71, Mr. Thomas Rye.—43, Mrs. M. Powell, hosier.—57, Mr. Goomar.—Mrs. Slodden.—Mrs. Jacob, wife of J. V. J. esq. At Maidstone, 63, $o. John Blake, many years printer and conductor of that respectable paper the Maidstone Journal. -65, the Rev. I homas Bailey. At Dover, 35, Mrs. Hambrook.--Miss Payn, York hotel.—101, Mr. Groes, stay Mr. Marks, builder.—91, Peter Fector, esq. of the well-known house of Minet and Fector.—70, Mrs. Mary Belsey. At Rochester, the Rev. Robert Perry, o: rector of Staplehurst.—Mr. R. Fleet, F

At Tunbridge Wells, 33, Mrs. F. M. Jansen, widow of C. J. Jansen, esq., and youngest daughter of the late Richard Cumberland, esq. the celebrated poet and dramatist. At Chathan), 79, Mr. Jeffery Horne.— Mr. Varmall, sea.—87, Mr. W. Landeu. At Margate, 80, Mrs. Carter.-Mrs. Marg. Gore. At Ramsgate, 67, Mrs. Jane Jarman. At Tentenden, Mr. Thomas Carpenter. -66, Mr. Espiñett.—At Folkestone, 56, Mrs. Sarah Major.—35, Mr. Robert Baker. –30, Mrs. Jones.—87, Mr. John Fuller. At Feversham, 80, Mrs. Wilson.--85, Mr. James Southae.—At Whitstable, 70, Mr. Thomas Hyder.—30, Miss Mount.— At Chilham, Mr. W. Tiddeman.—At Hollinghorn, Mrs. Russell.—At Hythe, 82, Mrs. Pamphlet. At Woolwich, 77, Lieutenant-General Huddleston, Colonel Commandant of the 5th battalion of the Royal regiment of altillery. He had been 57 years an officer of artillery, during which time he had been employed on many active and arduous services, in America, the West Indies, France, Among other duties on which he had been engaged, was that of supporting Gemeral Wolfe at Louisbourgh. He was an upright, virtuous, and religious man, and a zealous and an excellent officer.

sus's ot Married.] At Itchenor, Mr. Padwick, of Compton, to Miss Gibbs, of Itchenor. E. Vidall, esq. to Anna Jane, daughter of the Rev. James Capper, of Wilmington, Died.] At Chichester, Mr. William Millington, builder.—Mr. Prince, many years. a verger.—Major Antholy Greene, late Secretary to the Military Board at Calcutta.-Mrs. Barker.—At the Priory, 69, Henry Frankland, of Muntham, csq. Viceadmiral of the Red. At Rye, Mr. Mugridge, formerly of Cuckfield,—At Rotherfield, Robert Fry, gent. captain in the late North Pevensey Legion of Volunteers. At Arundel, Mr. W. Lane, merchant. At Norton-under-Huendon, 75, Matthew Quantock, esq. late Colonel of the Yeovil volunteer regiment. At his house at Brighton, 76, William Lane, esq. formerly of the Minerva Printing-office, London; from which concern he had retired about ten years, in favour of his late partner Mr. Newman. He was long distinguished for his copious publication of Novels, and for the energy with which he established circulating libraries in every town, and almost every village of the empire. For many years he was senior captain of one of the regiments of Londoa tuilitia; and was at that time well knowin for, his hospitalities at Greenwich, the usual head-quarters of the regiment. No man knew the world better, and none better how to manage and enjoy it. He was twice married, and his second lady survives him, but has left no children. R. AMPSHIRE. A public library is about to be established, by subscription, at the New Rooms, Green Row, Portsmouth, where will be introduced useful Works, Monthly Publications, Newspapers, &c. Married.] Mr. Jonathan Page, of the Dock Yard, to Miss Harop, of London. John Burridge, esq. banker, of Portsmouth, to Miss Heather, eldest daughter of Thomas H. esq. merchant. Died.] At Portsmouth, Mrs. Isaac, 35; and in three days her husband, Mr. Levy Isaac, 99. They were the oldest inhabitants on the Point, having lived much respected, in one house, nearly 60 years. In the prime of life, Mr. Daniel Lowe, attorney-at-law, Portsea.—Lieut. Charles Hill, formerly of his Majesty's ship Rota. At Gosport, Captain Holworthy, of the Suffolk Militia.-At Fratton, Mrs. Hill, wife of Mr. H. sen. farmer.—Mrs. Roberts, of Cross-street, Portsea. At Winchester, John Ridding, esq. a gentleman greatly respected in an extensive circle of business, and one of the aldermen.—s a the Soke, Mirs. Smith. —In the prime of life, Mr. Robert Bucksey.—Mr. Isaac Phillamour, of St. devotest, t 188

At Basingstoke, J. Mulford, esq. remarkable for several eccentricities. At Southampton, Brigadier-General Spry, who held a command for some time in the fifth division of the British army in the Per insula. He sacrificed his life, at the age of 44, by remaining on had service in Spain, many months after he ought to have been at home attending to the commencement of a fatal complaint. At Fre mantle House, 71, John Hill, esq.-Mrs. Peat ce. The Rev. T. Sheppard, D.D. rector of Quarley, and vicar of Basingstoke.—At Lymington, Lieutenant d’Ajlonville, of the Royal Foreign Artiliery.—At Upper Ryde, 25, Mr. John Bone, jun.-79, Mirs. Jenny Jennings.-65, Mrs. S. Miumford.-Miss Pelham, daughter of the Hon. Charles A. J’. She died at St. Lawrence Cottage, in the Isle of Wight. At Portsmouth, Lady Carter, the respected widow and the amiable counterpart of Sir John Carter, an account of whom was given at page 566, of our 25.1 voiume. The sweetness of her temper, the chcet fulmess of her disposition, and the urbanity of her deportment, rendered her the object of regard and esteem to those who enjoyed

opportunities of associating with her. She was ever alive to the .entine feelings of

frie:dship; hence, her friends uniforn:ly received from her the most assiduous and delicate attentions: aid, by anticipating the wisiics of those around her, she could not fail to please and delight, and to endear herself to theia. She studied more the comforts of ot!.ers than iner own: self was with her, on aii occasions, a secondary consideration. Perfectly guileless in her own Imind, she maturally received aii who approached her with affability, frankness, and benevoicnce.— “So pure, so good, she scarce could goess - at sin, “But thought the world without like that withim.”

Calumny and slander were utter strongers to her breast; and scandal situmiued her society: for she was constantly ready to defend the absent; and to offer every possible

excuse in extenuation of the conduct of

others, when brought untier the lash of cellsure, even though they were not her in:n:cdiate friel:ds. If censure ever escaped her lips, it must have been most deservedly due indeed. To iter donestics, she was kind and humane ; and when necessary their friend. In the varied character of daughter, sister, wife, and mother, she was a pattern of excellence. A constant and zealous friend of the poor and necessitous. Her acts of kindness and charity were known but to few, except those who were the fiequent objects of them. A case of real distress would instinctively direct her hand to her purse. Her virtues were all of the true Christian statup; mild and unassuming,

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candid and friendly, benevolcnt and attractive: for her reision was that of Christ; the religion of the heart; pure and simple, unfeigned and unostentatious. She was the partisan of no sect, established or tolerated; but the friend of the virtuous and the good, of every persuasion: she looked more to the character, than to the religious opinions of her friends. She died, as she lived, in peace with God and man. Wi LtSiii to E. Married.] At Westbury, the Rev. D. G., Wait, to Miss Priscilla Miorgan, of Bristol. At Mere, Mr. Charles Barnes, to Miss Hau, ah Jukes. At Sopworth, Mr. James Thomson, to Miss Jaile Phelps. Mr. W. Gaisford, to Miss Napier, of Westbury. Mir. James Bullock, of Devizes, to Miss Amor, of Ayebury. Dved.] At Warh;inster, Mr. Marks, postmaster.--90, the Rev. Peter iXébassy, vicar o, Hustborn-Tarrant, and of Barbage, Wilts. - \t Clatford, Air. Thomas Norris.--At Coshan, Mrs. Stop.--Mr. Young—At Presilure, Samuel Taylor, esq.-At Chippenham, Mrs. Ross.--Air. T. Hulbert, Suninia.-At U clifont, 20, Mr. Edward Legge, son of the Rev. Mi. L.-At Sapworth, Mr. §aniuc, Witchell. At outh Wraxia!!, 97, Mrs. Catherine Lot: the last surviving sister of W. L. esq. Hoy the will of this lady it appears her perso:ial cffects were sworn under 175,000l.; the legacies and annuities exceed in number one hundred, and amount in value to little short of 50,000l. Tie remainder of her personal estate, exceeding 100,000. fails to the Rev. Charles Coxwell, of Ablington, and Thomas Bruges, esq. of Melksham, her late stewa, d. sort Ei: SETS in I R.E. Biarried.] G. T. Seymour, esq. of Belmout, to Miiss Miariantle Billingsley, of Ashwick Grove. 'apt. W. H. B. Tremlett, R. N. to Miss Fanny Dawson, of Mosley Hill. Mr. K. Howeli, of Alhampton, to Miss M. C. Mioddy, of Maiden Bradley. Mr. R. G. Andras, to Miss Susan Coombs, both of Bath. G. Peacocke, esq. to Miss Donaldson, both of Bath. r Mr. W. Gooden, of Yurleigh, to Miss Rebecca Bryant, of l; ridgwater. Died.] At Bath, 78, Mrs. Golney.-89, Ames Hellicar, esq. formerly of Bristol.-In Sidney-place, 66, Coliu Miackenzie, esq. of Scatewell.—75, Mrs. A. Stewart.-80, Mrs. Sharp, 32, Mrs. B. Lloyd.—47, Mr. Chas. Dewetos.--The Rev. Mr. Ainsworth, Catholic priest.—In Great Bedford-street, Marianne, wife of Dr. H. Shute-35, Lady Eliz. Ross, widow of Lieut. Gen. Sir James Ross.-John Stomar, esq. of Bolton.—Mrs. Silcocks.--Mrs. Fisher.—18, Miss Tottenhau-Mir. Thos. Collius-Joseph Jekyll, esq. esq. of Marlbro'-buildings.-61, Mrs. Wallis, of Chipping Sodbury.—In Lamsdown-place, the Rev. Thomas Hardcastle, formerly fellow of Morton-college, Oxford, and Anglo-Saxon professor in that university, rector of Gamlingay, in Cambridgeshire, and of Wapley in Glocestershire. At Frome, 71, Mrs. Davis, late of Horningsham.—At Taunton, regretted, James Grosset, esq.-Mrs. Doman.-88, E. E. Jeffrices, esq. of Terrhill-house. At Tarley, 94, Mrs. Wiltshire.—At Shepton Mallet, 55, Mrs. Hippisley.—At Bath Easton, Mr. Bolwell.—At Nether-Stowey, 44, Mr. W. Sully, much lamented.—At Ninehead, Mary Blake, from not lying down when her clothes had caught fire.— At Beach, 51, Mr. John Wilton.—At Lambridge, Mrs. Sturge.—At Liston-hill, Mrs. Bryant.—At Marshfield, Mrs. Woodward. —At Weston, 59, Mrs. Whittington. DORSETs HIRE. Married.] Mr. Elswood, solicitor, of Chard, to Miss Pinney, of Blackdown-house. Mr. J. Morris, to Miss Phelps, of Booksbridge-street. At Great Toller, Mr. J. Smith, 78, to Miss A. Neale, 24. Died.] Mrs. Sarah Snelgar, widow of the late Mr. Wm. S. paper maker, Cary Mills, near Wareham. The consistency of her character, and remarkable patience under continued afflictions, will long endear her memory. At Blandford, 78, Mr. W. Symonds. At Dorchester, 92, Mrs. Brown.—Mrs. Hunt.—At Charminster, Mrs. Doddard. At Ensham House, Mrs. Bower.—At Miller's Close Cottage, Mrs. Roper.—Mr. Tizard, of Muston Farm. DEVONSHIRE. At a meeting of the Honiton Bible Society, a son of the Black Emperor Touissant, new about 19, was introduced by J. Symes, esq. and during the proceedings he made a very spirited harangue on the worth of the Bible and the value of Christianity. Mr. Woolmer's paper is published on Saturdays, and not on Thursdays, as stated by mistake in our last. Married.] John Chanter, esq. of Biddeford, to Miss J. Roberts, of Barnstaple. At North Tawton, Mr. James Rawlings, of Exeter, to Miss Susan Sweet. At Plymouth, J. Boom, esq. to Mrs. Densham; and on the same morning, R. Densham, esq. son of Mrs. D. to Miss Boon, daughter of J. B. esq.-John Steer, jun. esq. to Miss Wakeham. The Rev. W. T. Richards, rector of Stoke Abbot, to Miss Amelia Strachan, of Cliffden. At Kingsteignton, Mr. James Pulling, R.N. to Miss Langley, of Gappah. Died.] At Axminster, Miss Mary Stephens.—At Englishcombe, Mrs. S. Hughes, wife of the Rev. D. H. MoxTHLY MAG. No. 252,

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seli Moore, esq.--At Newton Abbot, Miss Pollixfen, a very amiable lady.—At Stedcombe, 76, the Rev. R. H. Hallett, rector of Exmouth. — At Exmouth, Lieut.-Col. Mann, in the East India Company service. –67, Mr. M. Halse.—71, Mr. Thomas Stapeling. — At Whimsey House, John Parker, esq. of the East Devon Militia.-At Stoke, Mrs. Fennimore.—At Stonehouse, Mr. Thomas James, R. N. CORNWALL. Married.] Mr. C. J. Lott, packet-office, Falmouth, to Miss Mitchell. Died.] At Truro, 68, Walter Reed, esq. —J. Whitbread, esq. son of Jacob W. esq. of Loudham Hall. WALES. Sir S. R. Głynne lately entertained and distributed premiums, at Hawarden, among his tenants for agricultural improvementS. A shock of an earthquake was felt on the 20th, at Knill Court, and other places in Radnorshire; and a storm of thunder, &c. took place at Harpton. Married.] Henry Allen, jun. esq. of the Lodge, Brecon, to Miss Sarah Anne Lloyd, of Caira. Mr. Rees Jones, of Ystrad, to Miss Grif. fiths, of Caesgaskin. JDied.] At Aber-ly-Sant, 101, Mr. Rees Morgan Rees.-15, Master Fred. Tymbs Jenkins, second and last surviving son of the two sons of Mr. J. printer, of Swansea, both of whom he lost in five days 1–4 At Carmarthen, 57, Mrs. Lloyd. – At Pen-y-fan, 92, Evan Griffiths, esq. At Wrexham, 24, Mary-Anne, eldest daughter of Richard Lloyd, esq. banker, of that town ; and, aged 22, Eliza, his second and only surviving daughter. The shock which the death of these two amable young ladies gave their affectionate f toer, who had long been an invalid in this city, produced a second apoplectic seizure, which deprived him of life, to the sincere regret of numerous friends and relations, by whom he was held in the greatest esteem and veneration: a man of more benevolcut heart—more coupassionate to 2 C the 190

the poor—and of a more endearing disposition than Mr. Lloyd, never adorned the circles of human society. SCOTs. A Nix. Married.] Francis Jeffey, esq. of Edin. burgh, to Miiss Wilkes, daughter of Chas. W. esq. of New York. Pied.] At Violet Bank, Dumfries, 75, John Johnstone, esq. At Terrangotie, 110, James Bluck, reiaining his distinct hearing to the last, and within a few weeks of his deuth, with his spectacles, reading his small print Bibie. He lately got an entire new set of teeth. At Edinburgh, 75, 1}onald Smith, esq. banker,and formerly lordprovost of that city. At Paisley, Mr. William M*Tarlame, student in divinity. He was the son of Dauie, Rio Farlane, distilier, of Paisley, and was born 14th February, 1791. After two years' attendance on at English teacher, he entered the grammar school of Paisley, and under the able instructions of that emiment teacher Mir. John Peddie, made great anti rapid classical acquirements; for he was pronounced othy qualified to be sent to the university a year sooner than usual. Even at ti is e: iod he discovered a maturity of judgment beyond his years. The approbation restowed by the various professors, and the uniform eminence which he attained, in the studies to wiłic!; his attention was directed, prove a that he was not prematurely hurricq to that seminary. He continued to prosecute his studies in Giasgow, for six sessions, devoting that period to the classics, polite literature, mathematics, and astronomy. His driigctice was unremitting, having 1.cver been a day absent, from the time of his elitering the grammar school; and he engaged in no study without acquiring a competent knowledge of it before he desisted from the pursuit. The usual amusements of youth did not attract his notice, or employ his time, for he would be seen walking thoughtfully along, while those of his years were busily engaged in piay; and, as he celtivated the intimacy of hist few, his time was not spent, or lost, by the interruption of the fivolous or the vain. 'I he practice of calling forth exertion, and rewarding merit by an annual exhibition of prizes, laudably obtains in the University of Glasgow; and to him who considers the necessity of stimulating the human mind by hopes, and bearing it forward to honourable distinction, this regulation of that learned body will appear peculiarly salutary. 'File love of praise, or desire of superiority, excited the subject of this memoir to put forth his energy. He obtained in each class, the first prize given for gemeral me; it, and of such prizes as were allotted for the best essays: he gained one or two yearly, so that he regularly carried home, at the end of the session, two or more of these pledges of success. Themerits of souie of his performances procured the

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warmest commendation; and, on some occasions, he was solicited to make copies, to be deposited in the class libraries. This mark of respect was considered by him as more honourable than the more showy distinction conferred at the annual exhibition. W!:en he had finished this long and successful course of preparatory study, he went in November 1812, to the University of Edinburgh, and commenced the various branches commected with the study of divinity. From his earliest years, he fixed his views on the clerical profession, and even before reason was supposed to dawn, he was proud of the idea of being, at some future period, a preacher. The early bent of his mind was rather encouraged, not opposed ; and he continued steady at all periods to the impressions at first received, never having been known to express a

wish for any other profession. He was re-.

served and retired in his habits, but his varied literature, and acute obscrvation, while in company, gave him great readiness

in discovering characters, and advantages

in argument. It was not easy to evade the force or ingenuity of his remarks; and his sententious mode of speaking, with a full distinct enunciation, rendered his conversation peculiarly agreeable. He thus gained upon the regard of those to whom he was known; the impression he made was favourable and lasting. His aim was utility and ornament, and he secured the esteem and friendship of all to whom he was introduced. The valuable circle of acquaintance which he formed in Edinburgh, will long esteem his worth, and regret his loss. Many to whom he was personally unknown, but to whom an homest famie had carried a favourable report, have sympathised in his fate; and, to use the language of one, who had for him nearly a paterual regard, he has been far heard of, for his period of life; and wherever his name was mentioned, it was spoken of with respect. But this promising prospect of respectability and usefulness, was to be overcast, for in the spring of 1813, he was severely attacked with cough, and stricture in the chest. He had been for nearly twelve years, less or more, subject to cough and mucous discharge from the bronchia, with occasional spitting of blood. The pulse had been quicker than usual for many years, and he felt a considerable degree of breathlessness for some months. The seeds of phthisis were in the habit, the banefiti fruit might have been prognosticated by a skilful observer, and it required ônly time and cold exposure, to bring the complaint to maturity. He was accus. tomed to dress too thin, and the chilly state of body, that is intended to give us warning of approaching or commenced danger, was suffered to proceed. This insuf. ficient protection from clothing, has cost multitudes their health and lives; and it is unfortunate, that when we are put in the

way

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way of making attainments in the most elegant parsuits, so little regard is paid to the preservation of health, without which no pleasure can be relished, and all accomplishments are vain. (Yur feelings inculcate the necessity of attending to comfort. able clothing, but these feelings are unheeded, or if they excite a momentary notice, obtain not due attention. It is tirought cffeminate to have recourse to a greater load of dress, to ward off the evil. The incouveniency is therefore submitted to, and hence the calamity from consumptive complaints, which spread so extensively in this island, strip so many families of their fairest hopes, their promised supports, envolving them—in tears and vain regrets.

- ir ELAN ox.

Mr. Magee, late printer of the Doolin Evening Post, has had another verdict against him for a libel, viz. for publish the Kilkenny Catholic Resolutions, wh the chairman of the meeting, Capt. Bryan

• had not the courage to avow. Mr. Magee is, in consequence, sentenced to pay a fine of 1000l. to be imprisoned for six months, to commence from the expiration of his former sentence, and to give security to keep the peace, himself in 1000l. and two sureties for 500l. each. DEATHS ABROAD.

At Paris, 94, the celebrated Fernardin St. Pierre, keeper of the botanic garden, author of the Studies of Nature, and other works.

In the West Indies, on board the Ram, one of Admiral Sir Francis Laforey's dispatch schooners, Mr. Edward Kennedy, *: 24, youngest son of the late Mr. John

• formerly of Highbury-place, latterly of Bunhill row. He had passed for lieutenant, and was on the eve of promotion, when, having volunteered to serve on board the above vessel, he perished with her in the dreadful hurricane of the 23d of August last. Excellence in exalted rank is seldom suffered to depart without some public testimony of regret, some tribute of admiration and respect, nor should merit, established and acknowledged in any station, pass unnoticed, because untimely ehecked in its career, and fatally arrested in its progress to that fame which seemed insured to its continuance. The subject of this memoir entered at an early age into the service of his country, and up to the time of his loss was constantly and actively engaged in it; an enterprising spirit and a heedless intrepidity frequently subjected him to dangers, from some of which he but miraculously escaped: he was, on one occasion, so fortunately and directly indebted to the humane attention and indefatigable perseverance of strangers, that mention of it cannot be omitted. In 1807, while on board the Bellette sloop, a Prussian messenger was proceeding in her to this country with dispatches of importance;

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approaching the Suffolk coast, the weather, which had for some time been tempestuous, become so much more so, that it was not thought prudent to attenipt lan:iing; the Elessenger, however, appeared so anxious to be put on shore, also gy earcsented the consequerees (+ de! * #3 o'. Kennedy vehinted :co, to put of with hi::i. X et the stoo creased, and a :3 sea ht, Łortie away the ridder of the boat and ic: ; her co, to uns; ote, in another y eize overi: Mr. Ren, edy, being an ext eitent ef, struggled until to strengo was exhi when he su:ik ; do so as too wea:iter had cajuted a little, overs went out, and he was accideota'ly brought up with a boat hook, #2:: without the east automati being conveyed on

was soft Cn the l;each white so looking for the otiers, so com; vain did they consider store him, - oy residing at South-Wold, having seen the a cident from a distance, epaired to “ue spot, and directed him to he ins: a*4 y taken to her hetise; the usual geaos wore immediately employed, the lady and her foody using tior titmost personal exertions tail prote:sional assistance was projected. No hope Was even then given, and it imust have been something little short of an almost inspired perstasioin of success that under such discouragement prompted them to increased efforts; they were continued, and at length symptoms of returning life were show” ; with transport they were witnessed and encouraged till perfect restoration was cofected. The satisfaction of that moment, and the sensations of the breast that had thus accomplished the object of its Christian-like solicitude, may, or rather ca, not be imagined. Mr. Kclinedy and one sailor were all that were saved. He soon afterwards left the Bellette and in the very uext cruize she foundered in the North Seas, and all were lost. Preserved in one instance from a premature fate, and avoiding it in another, it still, alas, too certainly awaited him, and that, where the firm mind and friendly hand could nothing have availed, contending with the overwhelming horiors of the hurricane. His excellence as a sailor is attested by his admiral in the account he transmitted to his family of his unfortumate and distressing end. His endeaving qualities as a brother, and his intrinsic virtues as a son, are impressed on the ecolleetion of those towards whese hoppiness they were unremittingly excrued. While is surviving relatives are yet fondly and frequently reverting to past events, and in the active exercise of their memories are i etracing occurrences that almost recall him to their circle, they will, in all of those comnected with his professional life, meet some consoling record of his merit. As they re

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