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politic causes for war! For example, Mr. C. insinuates to his comstituents, that after the Peace of Amiens, the French govern. ment, and its agents, and newspapers, loaded the English government with every species of opprobrium—that the French government refused to execute the stipulations of the treaty of Amiens—that it required the English government to evacuate certain countries previously conq;,&red, about which no provision was made in the treaty, before it would execute the stipulations contained in the treaty—that it publicly charged the English government with designs on its independence, and made open preparations for war, tinder the pretext that those designs realiy exist. ed—that it countenanced the most tagitious falsehoods against our sovereign, and on a refutation being published, demanded satisfaction for the publication of such refutation—that it determined on war owing to a minister out of place bullying one who was in place for keeping any terms with England—that it ordered its embassador to leave London, provided certain concessions at variance with the treaty of Amiens, were not made by a certain hour—that its embassador refused to make the said demand in writing—that before any declaration of war it seized the ships of England on the high seas—that because England, in retaliation, seized all Frenchmen within its power on land. France has since refused an exchange of prisoners, on the ground that the Frenchmen which were seized on land should not be set off against the Englishmen who at the same time were seized at sea—that France has since excited all the nations of Europe to make war on England, and has paid them large subsidies for that purpose—that because England repelled and overthrew those nations, France now charges England with the aggression, with inordinate ambition, and with want of public faith—that France having, during peace with Spain, captured three Spanish treasure ships, and blown up the crew, and passengers of one of them, entangled Spain in a war, for the purpose of resenting so unparalleled an aggression—that all the consequences of that and all wars, begun or excited by France, rest therefore on the French government, which is accountable for them at the bar of humanity—that France laid claims to the sovereignty of Hanover, and sought to annex it to France—that Prussia, for opposing such claim, was attacked by France, and conquered—that Russia joined Prussia in resisting the ambitious claims of France on Hanover, but, having lost all its armies, was obliged to submit to a peace at Tilsit, in which france robbed Russia of many fine provinces—that after Russia and other powers had established the independence of Pon

land, France overturned its government, and extinguished it as a nation—that although Russia respected the terms of the treaty of Tilsit, and made no preparations to renew the war, France prepared to invade Rossia—tost to avo. I the evils of an invasion, the Russian government sent several officers of State to to headquarters of toe mperor of France, to negociate a peace, but they were refused access even to the French secretary of state —that oratice has seized on the d niinions of all the weaker powers, to antiex them to France; having taken Finland soom Sweden, Norway from {}enmark, and various colonies from the iXutch, Portuguese, and Spaniards—that, restrained by no laws, she has violated the neutrality of i>eamark, Spain, and Switzerland—in fine, that although seven distinct overtures for eace have been made to her government, and although, on all occasions, the language of moderation and joistice has been held by the allies, and been followed by corresponding actions, yet she receives every overture for peace with coldness, and contrives to evade, by various subterfuges and equivocations, every attempt to restore peace to the world.--Such are Mr. Canning's facts, on which he justifies the origin and continuance of the war; but it must be evident to every one, that before they can be admitted as premises on which to found any just conclusion, it will be necessary to commit to the flames all the records of modern history, all the depositories of state papers, and even all the answers to overtures for peace which bear the signature of the OR AT or himself. Married.] Richard Scots, esq. to Miss Isabella Southart Markland, both of Liverpool. Mr. J. Birdsall, of Liverpool, to Miss Leather. Mr. King, distiller, of Liverpool, to Miss Balmer, of Toxteth Park. The Rev. Thos. Stone, D.D. of BrazenNose, rector of Wooton Rivers, Wilts, to Miss Amelia Withington, of Manchester. Mr. Wm. Thomson, of Ball's-bridge, near Dublin, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Edmund Margerison, esq. of Catteroll. Mr. William Taylor, merchant, to Mary Elizabeth,third daughter of Mr. Hazlehurst, both of Liverpool. At Warrington, Mr. William Standish, of Standish, to Miss Jones, daughter of the late Dr. J. of Warrington. At Witton, Mr. Browne, of Warrington, to Miss Holland. At Wigan, Mr. John Peet, youngest son of Henry P. esq. to Miss Newsham, eldest daughter of James N. esq. Mr. Smith, surgeon, of Garstang, to Miss E. Davies, of Winmarleigh. George R. Browne, esq. of Manchester, to Miss Mary Emmet, of Halifax.

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Cheshire.

[March 1,

grand children.—Mr. Charles Quirk, pawnbroker.—27, Mr. Thomas Alker.—82, Mr. George Rice, sen.—Mr. Thomas Howarth, of the Raven Im. At Ändenshaw, 63, Mr. Robert Ingham, the Bull's-Head Inn. At Coss Hoàses, aged 53, Mrs. Carless; and on ti:e sołiowing day, aged 49, Mr. Carless, iler has band. 'i'hey were in. terred at one grave at Bertiugton. At Fairfield, near Warrington, J. Watt, esq.-At Eccles, Mirs. Cooke. At Bardsea Hall, near Ulverston, 54, Lieutenant General Gale. At Bolton Ground, hear Ulverston, Mrs. Woodburn; she was accidentally burnt to death. At Lancaster, 33, Mr. Eph. Atkinson.— 45, Mr. John Proctor, of the brewery.— 93, Mr. Robert Hutton, a painter of local fame.—36, Mr. A. Ferguson.—Mrs. Bamber.—Mrs. Ogle.—Henry Cook, esq. At Garstan:, Capt. Geo. Rigby.—At Skirton, Mr. Henry Kirkham. At Everton, 56, John March, esq. formeliy of Lision. . CH psrt I re. Mr. Canning lately visited the saltworks and salt 1:ilies belonging to Messrs. Bonuses, near Northwich. On his descending, he was received with three times three, and w!.en landed belovo, a salute of 15th lasts was fired, g:ld the Cheshire iegion struck up “God save the King.” Mr. Canning went round a great part of the mines, and came to the space where a large table was laid out for 100 persons, with all the delicacies of the season. The mines were illuminated with about 15,000 lights: upwards of 300 persons were present. The depth is 112 or 115 yards. Whilst the company was at table many blasts were fired, which had the sound of the rolling of distant thunder. This compliment to a public man of Mr. Canning's fame, is creditable to Mr. Bourt:e—we have no difference with Mr. C. but for preferring fable to truth—and his own fancies to facts. Harried.] At Prestbury, Mr. William Hartley, to Miss Nancy Wardle, both of Macclesfield. At Stockport, Mr. Hugh Ker, of Manchester, to Miss Elizabeth Downing, of {}au-Bank. Liva.] At Chester, Joseph Dale, esq. Mir. Thomas Avern, cork manufacturer, in consequence of the overturning of a coach between Wakefield and Leeds; a man whose memory will be long regretted by his family and fricnds. At Witton, Mits. Firth, wife of Mr. T. Firth, and daughter of Mr. John Highfield, of Leftwich. iDeservedly lamented, Mr. Ralph Ferns, of Stockport, 37. 68, Mrs. Martha Jackson,widow, of Macclesfield, -

of

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- peravs H.I.R.E. The Derby Mercury records a singular instance of the effects of the inclement season upon aged people ; at St. Alkmond's church, in that town, within the space of a week, there were interred, in one grave, from one house, three persons, whose united ages amounted to 241 years. Married.] At Market Drayton, William Charlton, esq. Chilwell, to Miss Broughton, of Tunstall Hall. Died.] At Derby, 45, Nath. Edwards, esq. attorney at law.—29, Mrs. Gawthorn. —65, Mr. William Harrison, one of the brethren of the corporation.—Mrs. Phenmoisa Wright.—At Sheffield, Miss Buxton. —Inthe Irongate, Richard Wright, M.A.). 83; brother of the late celebrated painter. —68, Mr. Grayson, 88, Sarah, widow of the late Mr. James Wright.—Mrs. Newton, hosier.—In Friar-gate, 26, Miss Moore. At Heanor, 84, W. Brough, esq. At Wirksworth, Mrs. Phoebe Gell, formerly of Battersea. At Hartshorn, 74, Mrs. Jane Tunnecliffe. At Fossington, 23, Mrs. R. Spencer. At Temple Normanton, €6, Mrs. Cocking. At Brailsford, 99, Phoebe Murphin. At Chesterfield, Mr. Potter, shoe-maker. —15, Ann Bower, of the small-pox, one of many victims in that neighbourhood.— Mr. Joshua Elliott, 50, gardener.—Mrs. Parkin, wife of Mr. Parkin, of the Nag's Head Inn.-Mrs. Tomlinson, of the Angel Inn. —Mrs. Dilkes, of the Hillside.—74, Mirs. Barber. At Ashover, William Milnes, esq. Head merchant, after a short indisposition, in the prime of life. At Shardlow, 85, Mr. Sutton, father of James Sutton, esq. of the Namptwich bank; and about three weeks before, Mrs. Sutton, his wife. They had been married fifty years. At Swanwick, Hugh Wood, esq. 78. The Rev. Legh Hoskins Master, of Codnor, many years rector of Lympsfield. 71, Mr. William Gauntley, steward to the Duke of Rutland. At Ashborne, 72, Mrs. Fletcher, At Burmaston, 71, Mr. Low. At Bolsover, 84, Mr. Francis Fidler. At the Castle Inn, Castleton, Mr. Isaac Hall, jum. 69, Mrs.Winchester, of Bakewell. And a

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Similar circumstances happened in various parts of the kingdom. All communications and arrivals were in most places interrupted for thee or four days. Morried.] Dr. Alex. Manson, one of the physicians to the General Hospital, to Ann, daughter of the late T. Grist, gent. At Newark, S. Sketchley, esq. to Jane, youngest daughter of R. Forster, esq. At Whatton, near Bingham, W. Jackson, gent, to Miss Harrows. Dicq.] At Nottinoham, near Derbyroad, Mr. Hopkin —79, Mr. F. Boot, of Fennel-street, Loughborough.--In Mounteast-street, 48, Mr. Robt. Graham.—Mrs. Wright, on Richmond-hill.—in Parliamentstreet, 68, Mrs. E. Richards.--Mrs. E. Wright, Sun-hill.—80, Mrs. Ann Heywood, Parliament street.-At Beeston, Mrs. Mary Killingley.—86, Mrs. Hannah Stam!ey, of 3ridlesmith-gate.—76, Mr. Wm. Thornton, Parliament-street.—36, Mr. J. Łeach, Academy-court. At Newark, 78, Mrs. White.—66, Mrs. A. Cla 5, Mr. Titus Andrews.--—64,

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Lincoln—Leicester.

Robert Stringer.—At Barrowby, 63, Mrs.
Eminson.—At Culverthorpe, 78, Mr. John
Hilton; and, in a few days, Mrs. Sarah Hil-
ton, 75.-At Grantham, 84, Mrs. Houghton.
—At Donington, Thomas Armall Gleed,
gent. son of J. G. esq. same place.—Rich-
ard Quincey, 38, a man who had experi-
enced great vicissitudes in life.
1, EICESTERSH 1 R E.
Married.] Thomas Dawson, esq. Bread-
street, London, to Miss Mary Walker,
Northgate-street, Leicester.
Mr. Joseph Bentley, of Leicester, to
Mary, only daughter of Mr. James Jackson,
of Underwood.
Mr. Thomas Drakeley, of Coventry, to
Sarah, eldest daughter of Captain Paddy,
of Lutterworth.
Mir. Spence, to Miss Boulton, both of
Leicester.
Afr. oright, of Malden, to Miss Elizabeth.
Parsons, third daughter of Mr. E. P. of
Leicester.
i)ied.] At Leicester, 82, Thomas Paget,
esq. of the Newark, partner in the firm of
Paris, Paget, and Co. bankers of Leicester,
boot 'e' ter known to the public as an emi-
nei;t add successful breeder, formerly of
Histock, and as the friend and colleague of
the elebrated Bakewell. He was in every
sense a good man, and beloved by all who
know him.
Same place, Mr.T. Hill, of the Newark-
Street.
At Peckleton, the Rev. Mr. Wood, many
years rector of that parish.
At Scraptoft, Mrs. Carter, sen. mother
of the late I. E. Carter, esq.--Mr. Roddle.
At Coton, Mr. Daniel Rawlins, 25.
At Shearsby, Mrs. Walker. -
At Diseworth, Thomas Cheslyn, esq. 80,
He was the youngest and last surviving of
one-and-twenty children of the late Robert
and Cave Cheslyn, of Langley Priory, and
father of the last high sheriff.
At Great Wigston, Thomas Irvin, gent,
87, formerly a considerable grazier.
At the (Mid Dark Farm, near Ashby-de-
la-Zouch, Mir. Thomas Moore.—At Baby,
Mirs. Brewin Freer.—At Lutterworth, 93,
Mrs. Neale. At Gracedicu Abbey, Chain-
wood Forest, 67, Mrs. Mary Jesson.—At
Shardlow, Mr. Sutton, 85, father of James
S. esq. of Broughton-House.-At Upping
ham, Mr. Alsebrook, officer of excise, 74.
At the White House, Loughborough
Parks, G1, Mr. Robert Cumberland.
At Thringstone, 84, William Awarne,
gent. a very ingenious fiorist.
Joseph Eyre, labourer, 102,
At Somerby, Rebecca Dorothea Taylor,
eldest daughter of Mr. Isaac Taylor.
At 1,0cking; on, 80, Lady 'i'ownley, relict
of the late Sir Charles Townley, garter-kut,
principal king at arms; and afterwards
married to the Rev. Thos. Johnson, curate,
* f Luckington; and mother of Win, Town-
ley, gent, of Long Whatton. . - *

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At Loughborough, John Burkill, gent. at an advanced age. 74, Mrs. Barry, relict of the late Mr. B. of the Lion and Lamb, Leicester. At Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Mr. A. Hall, of the Bull-head Inn. At Oadby, Mr. Hidson.—80, Mr. John Waldron, grazier, whose integrity, benevolence, and suavity of manners, pi oduced him general esteem, At Hinckley, Mrs. Powderill, wife of Mr. Win. Powderill, of the Blue Boar inn. 5T.AF Foix;}stis R.E. At a sale of and at Stone, several lots were sold at the rate of 390, 225, and 200 guineas per acre; and thirty three acres, situated half a mile from the town, were sold for 4000 guineas. Married.] At Caverswall, Mr. W. Ratcliffe, of Pak-ha!, in Staffordshire, to Miss Harrison, of Buckmail. At Longdon, Mir. Charles Higgins, surgeou, of Barton-under-Needwood, to Miss Elizabeth Muchali, one of the daughters of the late Rev. T. Muchall. Died.] At Spring Vale, 64, Mr. John Hill, mercer, of Newcastle-under-Lyme; in 1790, he served the office of high constable. At Hanley, 23, Mr. Thos. Massey, late an itinerant preacher, in the Westleyan connection. At Newcastle, 93, Mr. T. Goodall, cabinet-maker.—Miss M. Smith, second daughter of the late James Smith, gent. At Newcastle-under-Lyme, in her 101st year, Hannah Williums, a widow"; she had been confined to her bed great part of the last

Jour years.

At Milford, near Stafford, Mr. Reynolds. At Penkridge, John Haddersich, gent. At Stone, 83, Robert Goodhall, gent. At the Old Springs, T. B. Harding, esq. At Cheadle Grange, in the prime of life, Mrs. Fowler.—At Brewood, Mr. Henry Green, youngest son of the late Mr. Green, surgeon.—At an advanced age, Mrs. Pitt, of Pearce Hay.—Mrs. Webb, of the Giffird's Arms.-At Bradley-lodge, near Bilston, Eilen, eldest daughter of Mr.T. Stokes. At Walsall Wood, 52, Mr. Thos. Parkes. Sincerely regretted, Mrs. Round, wife of Mr. Daniel Round, of Brierly Hill, near Bilston.—At Ombersley, 80, Mr. William Jackson.-63, Mrs. Stockley, of Ivetsey Bank.-At Stafford, Mr. Edward Pickin, 84.—Same place, Mrs. E. Burne, 82. wa RW i Cros is I.R.E. The Duke of Devotoshire has become the patron of the excellent Déaf and Dumb Institution, at Birmingham, and has presented it with 100 guineas. It having been represented to the Birmingham. Chamber of Manufactures and Commerce that preparations are making for introducing two hills of opposite tendency, the one for regulating, extending,

and rendering more effectual the act of 5th

Elizabeth, cap. 4, sec. 31, entitled, “an Act MonTHLY MAG, No. 352,

containing divers Orders to secure the Rights of Artificers, Apprentices, &c.;” and another, for the purpose of repealing so much of the said statute as inflicts penalties on persons working at, or exercising trades to which they have not served a seven years' apprenticeship:-it was resolved unanimously, “That any extension of the said statute, or even its continuance, if enforced, would not only be highly in; trious to the manufactures and commerce of the Inited King: don), but greatly oppressive booir to masters and jour neymen, by , estraining them in the liberty of disposing of their time, labor, and capital, in the way they may judge most likely to conduce to their own advantage. “That the enforcement of the said statute, by preventing a workman from exercising any other trade than the one which he has first acquired, would prove a restraint upon his rightful industry and ingenuity, and would oftentimes, during the fluctuations of commerce, reduce him to beggary. “That if the statute in question had been enforced it would have operated as a serions impediment to the establishment of such manufactures as are intended for the exclusive supply of foreign or occasional markets, inasmuch as individuals could not prodently have been bound apprentices to such manufactures, nor could capital have been safely embarked therein. “That the prosperity, extent, and excolence of the manufactures of this town, aie to be ascribed principally to the unrestrained freedom of every artificer to excrcise his ta'ênts in such manner as he thinks proper. “That, therefore, in the opinion of this chamber, the prosperity of the town of Birmingham and its neighbourhood, and the welfare and independence of its artizans, as well as the general prosperity of the manufactures and co-merce of the British empire, render it important that measures be adopted for supporting the bill intended to be introduced its to the House of Commons by Mr. Serjeant Onslow, more especially as any extension of the statute in question would be productive of incalcula. ble distress throughout the numerous population employed in the various manufactures of this town and surrounding district. “S, TERTIUS GA1. To N, Chairman.” These resolutions are exceedin...]y welltimed, and tend to set at rest a question that has long interested economists. Biarried.] Rev. C. Smith, of Navigation:school, to Miss Chambers, of Yardley-house. At Aston, Mr. C. H. Chambers, of Yardley hetise, to Miss Mary Powell, of Samail Heath. Mr. George Blyth, of Summer-hill, to Maly, youngest daughter of Mrs. Benton, of the Crescent. Lieutenant James Freeth, of the royal staff corps, to Harriet, eldest daughter of Mr. Johu Holt, of Birmingham. 2 B

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