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jor THUMPERLAND AN1) DURHAM. .* URING the late sale of soup at the soup kitchen, from the 1st day of June, 1812, to the 21st day of May, 1813, the quantity of soup sold at the reduced 3rice of one penny per quart, being about 1wo thirds foss on each quart, was, quarts 157,814; the amount of monies received was 657 i. 1 1s. 23d. ; the amount of the first subscription was 5841. 16s, and of the second subscription 5841. 5s. 1d., making a total of monies subscribed of 11691. 1s. 1d.: and the total amount of disbursements by the soup kitchen was 1809). 3s. (#d. The frost was so intense at Newcastle, that Fahrenheit's thernometer, on the town moor, was 14 degrees below the feezing point ; and in a garden at Ravensworth it was at 13. At York it was 28 degrees bclow the freezing point. ‘ihe River Tyne was long frozen both above and below the bridge. It will be a memorable circumstance that so large and rapid a river should have been f ozen to the thickness of 20 inches; and the Antiquarian Society of Newcastle have recorded the event on ve Hum. Gambols were exhibited in every form on the ice. A grand mausoleum is to be erected by public subscription over the remains of Burns, in St. Michael's Church-yard, Dumfries, and a meeting was lately heid to promote the object, at which General Dunsop, M.P. presided—and the Rev. Henry Duncam, of Rothwell, and Mir. W. Grierson, of l)umfries, were appointed treasurers to the committee. As soon as the design is settled, we hope to be enabled to introduce a representation of it to our readers, 'I'he deaths in the parish of Tynemouth, since last Chiistmas day, have anyounted to above a hundred. Many of the deceased had reached from 60 to 70 years and upwards. One woman, mained Eleanor Gibson, of Whitley, had attained 103 years.-Tyne Mercury, Feb. 1. Married.] At Monkwearmouth, Thomas Bailey, esq. to Maria, daughter of Mr. W. $1oody. At Stockton, Mr. W. Fair, to the daughter of John Jackson, esq. At Heworth, G. W. Aylmer, esq. to Henpietta, second daughter of the late Henry £ ison, esq. of Hebburi-ball,

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advantages over the common loom.

eccentricities.—Mr. John Brigrell, Hartko', 77.—At Slaley, 66, M. John Nico – At Whixley Hall, 94, Mr. Rob isoer, of Jorvaux Abbey. —At Dukes #43, 8t, the widow of Mr. * estgarth.--At Slaley East Wootoot, 82, Mr. Joseph Dobbison.—At Newbiggin, lear Łanchester, or, John Bierly, 8 i.— Langley Park, Ann, wife of Mr. Robert Taylor, of Notsley, 45.--23, Visiiana, Søn of George Huntley, of Heworth Shore.-A: ; low Flatworth Farm: House, faniel Revely, it any years principal hind to the owners of Percy Hain Collierv.–At Twinchburn, the wife of Mr William Richmond.-A; Benton House, the wife of Wiiiiam Ciarke, esq. 40.--—At Newbiggin, the wife of Bryan Harrison, esq. 49.—At Horsley, Margaret, second dair hier of. Mr. S. Dobson, 23.−At Hexham, Mrs. Sarah Murray, 91.-Mrs. Jane Chester, 100, Elizabet” saylor, 109.-25,the wife of Mr. Ralph M litener, of Barnardcastle.—The wife of Mr. Samuel Parker, of Winlaton, 69. CUM BERLANI). A NI). W. EST MORE LArn (). A martin last year fixed her nest directly over the window of the inn at Kampside, in Low Furness. After her young were hatched, she became a very troublesome visitant, by throwing the cleansings of her nest upon the window sill. The servant girl, with more attention to cleanliness than humanity, removed the inconvenience by destroying the nest with a broom. The young birds fell to the ground of course, which were placed upon the window sili from motives of compassion: in the mean time, the palents collected a great number of their own species, who quickly built a second nest, sufficient for the reception of the distressed family, and the young were safely conveyed to their new lodgings by the parents and their assistants.--(Westmoreland Advertiser.) Buring the late frost, Derwent Lake was frozen over for six weeks. The bats also were driven by cold from their more exposed retreats near Kendal, and flew about in quiest of better shooter. A great iro particularly among the aged, took in all the northern

counties during the late severe weather.

At Henrith it extended to children, aud chiefly to young boys. An ingenious mechanic in Kendal has invented a loom for weaving carpets, the principal parts of which are on an entire new construction, and it possesses several It has neither tail-cords, loops, nor pullies, and takes up only two-thirds of the room that is required for one on the old plan. The principal object is to save time in changing patterns. Married.] Mr. George Buckham, of Whitehaven, to Miss E. Bardgett, of Lit. tle Salkeld.-Mr. John Ivison, of Dick's 2 A Gate,

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Porkshire.

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Robinson, Captain B. King.—Mr. T. Fisher.—64, Mirs. Dixon.—99, Mr. John Fox. —82, Mr. George Rooke.-89, Mrs. Steele.—Mrs. Murthwaite.—Mrs. M. Wilson.—90, Mrs. Hodson.—Mrs. Brownrigg. —Mrs. 'surnbull.—At Workington, 65, Mrs. E. Smithson.—Mrs. Mawson.-71, Mrs. Hetherington. York:(SHHRE. A circular letter from the post-office to the different post-masters in the country, recommended a machine called a snoutplough, for clearing the roads. This machine, which is made by a few boards in the form of a wedge, was first used some years ago at Wimpole, by Mr. Wm. Oswald, bailiff to the Earl of Hardwicke. From the mildness of the winters since that time, it has not since been used, but during the late obstruction of the roads by the drifed snow, these machines have been sent by his lordship, in various directions on the public roads, with the best Success. A pian is projected for bringing up the navigation to Sheffield, and when the different branches of it are executed and the junction formed, there will then be a communication through Sheffield with the Mersey, the Trent, and the Humber. It appears that the most beneficial effects have resulted from the establishment of a house of recovery for fever patients at Leeds. In one hundred cases of typhus in and near Leeds in 1813, only two instances occurred of a second individual of the family being attacked on the first being instantly removed. In 1802, when fevers were produced from the same causes that are likely to operate at present, viz. scarcity and high price of provisions, and want of clothing, 450 new cases of fever appeared in two months. At Croft House, near Bradford, at nine o'clock ou the 17th of January, the thermometer fell to 3° of Fahrenheit, or 29* below the freezing point; at one, on the same morning, in the botanic garden at Hull, it fell to 6°. We are sorry to see Notices of inproper management in the late Lunatic Asylum at York. How great is the contrast afforded by the Retreat in that city Of this latter establishment we wish to receive an account from some correspondent. Blurried.] Joseph Hudson, esq. of Hardwick Hall, to Mrs. White, of Sheffield, ko. Hull, Capt. T. Faunt, to Miss Sus. ei'. Mr. Geo. Stansfield, of Bradford, to Miss Anna Micklethwait, of New Laith's Grange. Mr. W. Walker, to Miss E, both of Huddersfield. Mr. R. Carr, of Stackhouse, to Miss A. Forster, of Settle. Mr. J. Carr, of Kiddle-lane, to Miss Cullingworth, of Stauk House.

Lancaster,

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evetting Thursday, the 16th day of December, left in the company of a contleman, (to whom she was on the point of marriage) in the parlour of her so 's house, in Pridge-street, Manchester, aft r her sister (who was unwell) had retir 3 to rest. In the morting it was discover od that she had not been in bed, and a hote, purporting to be her hand-writor, was found in the parloar, from which there wo

reason to fear that sha was no ion cer living. Public anxiety, which was raised to a high pitch in regard to her fate, at length inet with a melancholy termination in a discovery of the body on Yondav, the 7th of February, on the banks of the Irwell. On Tuesday the 6th, an inquisition was heid before the coroner's jury, touching her death ; and, after an investigation of two days, the verdict was as follows:– “That the said Lavinia Robinson was found drowned in the river 1, we'l; but hour, or hy that moons, she came into the teaser of the said river, no vidence appeared to the jurors.” —Thus, says the Bianchester Gazette, one of the most virtuous of the sex, a young lady possessing superior mental accomplishments, with a person lovely as her mind, and of the most focinating manners, is lost to her family, friends, and society. Her compositions, both in prose and verse, breathed throughout the purest sentiments of religion and virtue, and prove her to have had a warm and affectionate heart, great vivacity,and an uncommon playfulness of disposition.—The following is a copy of the original note which was found on the table in the room where lavihia and her assumed lover were left, on the 16th of December: —“ With my dying breath I attest myself innocent of the crime laid to my charge / Adieu / God bless you all / I cann to outlive his suspicion "--It appeared from the evidence, that the family

disbelieved the note to be the land-writing:

of their sister; and a gentleman, who was acquainted with the assumed lover's handwriting, did not beheve it to be his. It also appeared in evidence, that this lover had accused Lavinia with a want of chastity, and in the truth of which he poisisted on the inquest, and gave in a writ

ten document, in which he thus expressed

Lancashire.

[March 1,

himself:-" I ventured upon the desperate alternative of being convinced of virtue before marriage. On Thursday evening, December 16th, I discovered, with horror, that my fears were realized; I immediately taxed her with it: in answer to which, she asserted her innocence with considerable vehemence.” The high sense of honour and character of the amiable young lady, coupled with the clear and satisfactory testimony of the surgeons, (who examined the body at the request of the coroner.) preclude the possibility of the least truth in the accusation of this person. In the case of an individual, feeling and sympathy were never more highly wrought. Her remains were interred in St. John's Church-yard, amidst the sighs and tears of hundreds of sympathising spectators. The Committee for bettering the condition. of the Poor of Lircrpool issued, during the late inclement season, a large and timely supply of excellent rice, meat, &c. which were sold at little more than half the cost price. Tickets entitling the bearer to receive this neurishing food were sold, and the charitably inclined dispensed these tickets instead of money. The Strangers' Friend Society has, according to its custom, afforded relief of the most substantial and vital nature, to a great variety of objects in a deplorable state of wretchedness. '?'his excellent institution has, within the last four weeks, distributed (in small portions) upwards of one hundred pounds in cash : clothing and blankets to the amount of fifty pounds; and 12,000 quarts of rice soup, purchased from the soup shops. Nearly four hundred of the friends of MR. CAN NING lately partook of a dinner at the Łiverpool Arms Hotel, where a large room was fitted up with great elegaince and taste. Jon N BoI.To N, esq. was in the clair, and after the usual loyal toasts, he gave the health of Mr. Canning, who returned thanks in a speech, in which an entire political fabric was fantastically raised on the basis of his own imagination; and in which the plainest facts in modern history were reversed to suit a favourite and mischievous hypothesis. To relish the beauties of Mir. Canning's eloquence, it is necessary that a man should believe every thing that has not happened, and disbelieve every thing that has happened. Nothing could be more able if his premises were true; or, being true, were relevant—but it so happens, in regard to this ingenious orator, not only that his premises are visionary, but that, if founded on reality, they would have no relevancy to his conclusions. He is, in fact, a friend to this wide-spread and devastating war, for causes which exist only in his own heated imagination; and which, if they could be proved to have existence, would then be found to be no just, legitimate, or politic

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