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neral providence, (with respect to which, it is plain, that, in the general, it does not;) then, the questions will be, as before, Who is ? Or, who can? Or, who ought to be influenced and wrought upon by this address ? And, the answer will be, as before, viz. that it is the petitioner, and he only; as he is, or ought to be hereby prevailed upon, to use his own endeavour, for the obtaining of those good things, which God, in the course of his general providence, has prepared for him. Again,

The next article in the prayer referred to, is expressed in those words, viz. Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us. With regard to this petition, I think, it is not to be supposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should engage the Deity to exercise such mercy towards us, which, antecedent to this address, he would not have done, nor was disposed to do; nor, is it to be supposed, that our Lord intended, that we should point out to the Deity, what should be the condition, upon which he should Thew mercy to us. This, I think, could not be our Lord's design, in directing us to pray as aforesaid; because, he knew full well, that the condition, upon which God would shew mercy to finners, was a point settled, antecedent to our address, and could not be altered by it; and, that God would shew mercy to thoje finners, and those only, who, by their repentance and reformation, (which includes the duty of Thewing mercy to their fellow creatures) have

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rendered themselves the suitable and proper objects of it; consequently, such an address would be irrational and improper. Now, if our asking forgiveness of God, cannot possibly affe&t him, so as to dispose him to exercise fuch mercy towards us, than otherwise he would have done, then, the questions will return, viz. Who is? Or, who can? Or, who ought to be influenced and wrought upon by this address ? And, the answer will return as above, viz. that it is the petitioner, and he only; as he is, or ought to be excited by it, to render himself the proper obje&t of that mercy and forgiveness, which he desires to obtain at the hands of his Maker.. Again,

The next article in the Lord's prayer is expressed in those words, Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The word evil in this place, I think, is used to express moral evil; and, is the same, as if it had been said, Lead us not into temptation, but, rather, deliver us from the evil we may be tempted to. With regard to this petition, I think, it ought not to be supposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should endeavour to restrain the Deity from designedly leading us, by his particular and special interposition, into any thing that might tempt or draw us into sin; or, that he would particularly interpose and destroy our agency, in osder to prevent our being guilty of those sins we may be tempted to. This, I think, could not be our Lord's intention, in directing us to

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address Almighty God as aforesaid; because, as on the one side, he could not but know, that God cannot possibly be tempted to evil bimself, neither tempteth be any man: So, on the other side, he could not but know, that when any person is tempted to evil, it must be left to that person's choice, whether he will maintain his innocency, or not; confequently, such an address, that is, to address God with this view, would be irrational and improper. Now, if our petitioning God that he would not lead us into temptation, and that he would deliver us from evil, cannot possibly affect him, so as to restrain him from leading us into fin; nor, can it be an excitement to him to destroy our agency, in order to prevent our being guilty of it; then, the questions will be, Who is? Or, who can? Or, who ought to be influenced and wrought upon by this address ? And the anfwer is evident, viz. that it is the petitioner, and be only; as he is, or ought to be led by it to keep as much as possible out of the way of temptation; and, when he is tempted to evil, then, to use his best endeavour to maintain his innocence. Again,

The next and laft article of the Lord's prayer, is expreffed in those words, viz. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen. In this article, we take upon us to inform God, that he has a right of dominion over the intelligent and moral world, thine is the kingdom; that he has power fufficiènt to support his authority, by rewarding

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the obedient, and punishing the transgressors of his law, thine is the power; and that, as all things ought now, so they will finally terminate in his glory, thine is the glory for ever and ever. With regard to this last article of the Lord's prayer, I think, it is not to be supe posed, that our Lord intended that we, in the use of those words, should increase the divine knowledge, by acquainting God, that he has a right of dominion over the intelligent and moral world, that he is invested with power sufficient to support his authority, and that, as in the natural world, all things do, fo, in the moral world, all things ought, and will, finally terminate in his glory. Nor is it to be fupposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should increase the divine goodness, by our prevailing upon God to make use of such means, for the introduction, or increase of his kingdom and moral government amongst men, which, antecedent to our address, he would not have done, nor was disposed to do. This, I think, could not have been our Lord's design, in directing us to address Almighty God, as aforesaid; because, he could not but know, that the divine knowledge could not possibly be enlarged by any information we could give the Deity; and that God was in himself disposed to do, whatever was proper for him to do, antecedent to our address, and that he would do it, whether we addressed him, or not; consequently, such an address must be irrational and improper. Now, if our

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telling God, that his is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever, cannot poffibly inform, nor influence him, by acquainting him with what he did not known, nor by leading him to do what, otherwise, he would not have done, antecedent to our address; then, the questions will return, as before, Who is? Or, Who can? Or, Who ought to be influenced and wrought upon by it? And the answer again is most apparent, viz. that it is the petitioner, and be only, as he is, or ought to be, led by this address, to become more and more a dutiful and faithful subject of God's kingdom, by living under a just sense of God's power, by conforming his mind and life to God's will, and, by endeavouring, that his own, and other mens actions, may, as far as he can contribute towards it, terminate in the glory of his Maker. . · Thus I have examined the Lord's prayer in its several articles, and have thewed, that it is in this view, viz. when it is intended to affeet and influence, not the Deity, but the petitioner only, that it can be a rational and proper address to God. And this, I think, is the case of prayer in general; it is intended to affeet and influence, not the Deity, but the petitioner only. Whether there may be particular. instances, and extraordinary occasions, in which the case may be otherways, I have not here taken upon me to determine; and, therefore, such instances and occasions I am not concerned with. And as to the following, or the

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