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goodness, by our informing God, that he stands to us in the relation of a Father, which relation, antecedent to our address, he was ignorant of; and, thereby, engage him to act a fatherly part by us, which, before our application to him, he was not disposed to do. This, I think, could not be our Lord's design in directing us to address Almighty God, as aforesaid; because, he knew full well, that the divine knowledge cannot possibly be increased by us, and that God is in himself disposed to do more abundantly for his dutiful children, than they can ask or think; consequently, fuch an address, that is, to address God with this view, would be irrational and improper. Now, if our telling God that he is our Father, cannot possibly increase the divine knowledge, nor the divine goodness, and consequently, cannot posfibly influence or change the Deity, the questions will be, What fignifies this address? Or, who is it that ought, or can be influenced and wrought upon by it? And, the answer to these questions is most apparent, viz. that it is the petitioner only who can, and who ought to be affected and influenced by the fore-mentioned address; as he, hereby, reminds himself of the relation he stands in to his Maker, and consequently he ought to be stirred up, from a sense of that relation, to increase in such a temper and disposition of mind, and such a behaviour, as is suitable to, and becoming an affectionate and dutiful child of God; and this is H 2

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the purpose, the fore-mentioned address is intended to serve, and is capable of serving. And,

In this first article of the Lord's prayer, we not only tell God, that he is our Father; but also, that he is in beaven. By his being in heaven, I think, is intended, that he is not like earthly parents, who, in many respects, are upon a foot of equality with their children, but on the contrary, that he is, in all respects, greatly above them, greatly superior to them. And, with regard to this, I think, it is not to be fupposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should stir up and prevail upon God to make a right use of that power and superiority, we hereby acknowledge him to have over us, which, antecedent to this address, he was not disposed to do; this, I say, could not be our Lord's design, because he well knew that God is always disposed, from his great goodness, to make the most proper use of his power and superiority, and, therefore, must have been so disposed, antecedent to our address; consequently, such an address would be irrational and improper. Now, if our telling God, that he is greatly above us, greatly fuperior to us, cannot possibly affe&t or influence him, so as to stir him up to make any other use of his power and superiority, than he would have done, antecedent to this address; then, the questions will be, Who is? Or, who can be influenced and wrought upon by it? And the answer is plain and evident, that it is the petitioner, and be only; as it awakens in

him a just sense of the power and fuperiority of God, and as it disposes, or ought to dispose him to be affected, and to act accordingly, Again,

The next article of the Lord's prayer is expressed in those words, Hallowed be thy name, By this, I think, is intended, that men should have such a sense of the Deity impressed upon their minds, as is worthy of him; that is, as is suitable to his natural and his moral perfections. With respect to this, I think, it must not be supposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should engage the Deity to take such measures with his creatures, as might introduce into their minds a proper sense of himself, which measures, antecedent to this address, he was not disposed to take with them. This, I think, could not be our Lord's design, in directing us to pray as aforesaid; because, he was well satisfied, that Almighty God does not stand in need of the importunity of his creatures, to engage him to do, what was proper for him to do, antecedent to their application; consequently, such an address to God, that is, addressing him with this view, would be irrational and improper. Now, if our telling God, that we wish his name may be hallowed, cannot possibly affect him, so as to dispose him to do, what otherwise he would not have done; then, the questions will be, as before, viz. Who is? Or, who can ? Or, who ought to be influenced and wrought upon, by this address? And the answer is plain, viz. that it is the petitioner and be only; as he hereby is, or ought to be led by it tó poffess his own mind, and also to endeavour to possess the minds of others, with a just and worthy fenjë both of the natural and the moral perfections of their Maker. Aga ,: The next article of the aforesaid prayer is expressed in those words, viz. Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, in earth as it is in beaven, This I consider as one and the same article in the Lord's prayer, because, God's kingdom, or moral government, amongst men, consists in his subjects conforming their minds and lives to his will. And here again, I think, it is not to be supposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should excite and ftir up the Deity to do that; towards the introduction or increase of his kingdom and moral government amongst men, which, antecedent to, and independent of this address, he would not have done, or have been disposed to do. This, I think, could not be our Lord's defign, in his directing us to address Almighty God as aforefaid; because, he could not but be sensible, that God is in himself always disposed to do, whatever is proper towards the introduction, or increase of his kingdom, antecedent to, and independent of our application to him ; consequently, luch application, that is, an application to God with this view, would be irrational and improper. Now, if our acquainting God, that we desire the introduction or increase of his kingdom, or moral government, amongst men,

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cannot possibly affect him, so as to dispose him to do, what otherwise he would not have done, and which, I think, is most apparently the truth of the case; then, the questions will be, as above, viz. Who is ? Or, who can? Or, who ought to be influenced and wrought upon by this address ? And the answer, again, will be as above, viz, that it is the petitioner, and be only ; as he is, or ought to be led by it, to use his endeavour, that God's will may be done on earth, both by himself and others, with that hncerity and univerjality, as it is done in heaven. Again, · The next article in the Lord's prayer, is expressed in those words, Give us, this day, our daily bread. With respect to this petition, I think, it is not to be supposed, that our Lord intended, that we, in the use of those words, should attempt to engage the Deity to employ the ravens in bringing us bread and Alesh, morning and evening, as in the case of Elijah, or, that he should any other way, by a particular and special interposition of his power, supply every want we are exposed to. This, I think, could not be our Lord's design, in directing us to pray as aforesaid; because, he well knew, that Almighty God makes a constant and ample provision for his creatures, in the course of his general providence; consequently, such an address would be irrational and improper. Now, if our praying to God for our daily bread, does not affe&t or influence him, so as to engage him to make any other provision for us, than in the course of his ge

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