Amadis of Gaul, Volume 3

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J. R. Smith, 1872

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Page 77 - ... stocked with sundry things which it had never before known. To the four sides of the Tower water was brought from the neighbouring mountains by metal pipes, and collected into four fountains, and the water spouted so high from the golden pillars and through the mouths of animals, that it was easy to reach it from the windows of the first story, for it was caught in golden basons wrought in the pillar, and by these four fountains was the whole garden watered.
Page 73 - ... she made ready to receive Oriana, whom of all persons in the world she most desired to see, because of her great renown that was every where spread abroad. She therefore wished to appear before her like a Lady of such rank and such wealth as indeed she was ; the robe which she put on was adorned with roses of gold, wrought with marvellous skill, and bordered with pearls and precious stones of exceeding value...
Page 64 - Amadis beheld the wonders which his two comrades were performing, and how his men were now fighting beside him, he made at Brondajel, whom by his rich arms he knew to be the chief, and with one blow felled him ; then seeing that the rest, terrified at that, had ceased to resist, he tore off Brondajel's helmet, and striking at his face with the pummel of his sword, demanded where Oriana was ; the Roman pointed to the chamber that was fastened. Amadis called upon Angriote and Don Bruneo ; they joined...
Page 4 - Grumedan, answered Gradamor, the Romans are not of your condition ! ye praise yourselves before the thing be done, and we, when it is done, suffer it to be forgotten, and for this reason there are none equal to us. Would to God our battle were upon this quarrel, though my comrades were not to lend hand ! Try your fortune with him now, replied Grumedan, and if he remain whole and unhurt after the joust, I will engage that he shall combat you upon that quarrel, and if by reason of any harm that cannot...
Page 5 - ... to relate your prowess in Rome I freely permit you : this he said so loud that the queen and her company could hear it. Now I tell you Don Grumedan was right glad to see how the Knight of Great Britain spake and acted against the .Roman, and he said to Gradamor, If you sir and your comrades do not speed better, there will be no need to throw down the walls of Rome for your triumphal return. Gradamor answered, You think much of this? but if my comrades finish the joust, I shall settle what you...
Page 64 - ... means separate, unless the chain should break. Then Amadis made way through his own people who were somewhat dismayed, and setting foot on the edge of his own ship, leaped into the other; it was a great leap, so that he fell upon his knee, and they laid on him many blows before he could rise. Howbeit maugre their efforts he rose and laid hand to his good sword.
Page 65 - Ah Amadis ! light of the oppressed ! you have saved me ! Mabilia was on her knees before him, holding by his skirts, for he had not seen her, but then he raised her and embraced her, and called her his dear cousin. Then would he have left the cabin, but Oriana took his hand: For God's sake do not leave me! Fear not, he replied ; for Angriote, and Don Bruneo, and Gandales are in the ship, with thirty of our Knights, and I must go elsewhere, for we are engaged in a great battle. Then Amadis went out...
Page 218 - Lisuarte's army was few in number and sore wearied, Esplandian was greatly grieved to think of this danger, and said to Sargil, Brother follow me, and do not let us rest till the king be succoured, and with that they turned the reins and galloped all the remainder of the day and the night also, till at dawn they overtook King Perion who had retreated only four leagues, and had pitched his camp beside a brook among fruit trees, and set guard upon the side of the mountain; for he also had learnt of...
Page 214 - For though this good man was in orders, and led so strict a life in so remote a part, he had in his time been a right good knight in the court of King Lisuarte's father, and after of King Falangris ; so that though he was perfect in things divine, he was also well versed in things...
Page 237 - Amadis upon this went himself to Agrayes, knowing that he could best prevail upon his cousin, and he told him all that had passed, and besought him to go with him, since friendship was now re-established. Agrayes answered, Cousin, you know my anger lasts no longer than it is your will; but God send that the service which you have now done the king may be better guerdoned than your former ones ! This has made him suffer for the past, and that belike may change his condition ! So he bade the army halt...

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