The Queen's Comrade: The Life and Times of Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, Volume 1

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Hutchinson & Company, 1901 - 658 pages
 

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Page 101 - Interests ; and though my dutiful Behaviour to your Majesty in the worst of Times, (for which I acknowledge my poor Services much over-paid) may not be sufficient to incline You to a charitable Interpretation of my Actions ; yet I hope, the great Advantage I enjoy under Your Majesty, which I can never expect in any other change of Government, may reasonably convince Your Majesty, and the World, that I am acted by a higher Principle, when I offer that violence to my Inclination and Interest, as to...
Page 308 - Marlborough's kindness, especially at a time when he deserves all that a rich crown could give. But since there is nothing else at this time, I hope you will give me leave as soon as he comes to make him a duke. I know my dear Mrs Freeman...
Page 90 - tis possible it may be her child, [the queen's,] but where one believes it, a thousand do not. For my part, except they do give very plain demonstrations, (which 'tis almost impossible now,) I shall ever be of the number of the unbelievers.
Page 297 - The word Church had never any charm for me in the mouths of those who made the most noise with it...
Page 164 - ... to Kensington as often as I can for air, but then I can never be quite alone ; neither can I complain that would be some ease ; but I have nobody whose humour and circumstances agree with mine enough to speak my mind freely.
Page 137 - For whatever Necessity there was of deposing King James, he was still her Father, who had been so lately driven from that Chamber and that Bed; and if she felt no Tenderness, I thought she should at least have looked grave or even pensively sad at so melancholy a Reverse of his Fortune.
Page 242 - And now it being quickly known that the quarrel was made up, nothing was to be seen but crowds of people of all sorts flocking to Berkeley House to pay their respects to the prince and princess ; a sudden alteration which I remember occasioned the half-witted Lord...
Page 90 - My dear sister can't imagine the concern and vexation I have been in, that I should be so unfortunate to be out of town when the queen was brought to bed ; for I shall never now be satisfied, whether the child be true or false.
Page 300 - It is impossible to express with what a heavy heart I parted with you when I was by the water's side. I could have given my life to have come back, though I knew my own weakness so much that I durst not, for I knew I should have exposed myself to the company. I did for a great while, with a perspective glass, look upon the cliffs, in hopes I might have had one sight of you.
Page 138 - Whitehall ; lay in the same bed and apartment where the late Queene lay, and within a night or two sate down to play at basset, as the Queene her predecessor used to do.

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