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February 8, 4.30 p. m. (room 43): Society for Philosophical Inquiry. February 8, 8 p. m. (room 43): American Horticultural Society. Business meeting.

February 10, 8 p. m. (auditorium): American War Mothers. A patriotic gathering, with vocal and instrumental music and addresses.

February 15, 8 p. m. (auditorium): National Aeronautic Association. Illustrated address by Maj. L. D. Gardner on "Twenty-one thousand miles over the airways of Europe."

February 22, 10 a. m. (auditorium): Masonic Club of the District of Columbia. Celebration of Washington's birthday. Address by Hon. A. M. Free, member of Congress from California, on "The life of George Washington and Masonry."

February 23, 8 p. m. (room 43): The Wild Flower preservation Society. Illustrated address by Dr. Edgar T. Wherry on "Rediscovering lost wild flowers."

February 26, 1 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School. Address by Dr. H. E. Ewing on "Ticks."

March 3, 8 p. m. (room 43): The Entomological Society of Washington. Illustrated address by C. A. Weigel on "Hot water bulb sterilizer," and W. H. White on 66 The pea aphis problem." March 8, 11.30 a. m. (auditorium): Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Illustrated address by Dr. Raphael Zon on "What is a

forest"?

March 8, 3.30 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School. Address by Dr. Harrison G. Dyar on 'Mosquitoes."

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March 8, 4.30 p. m. (room 43): Society for Philosophical Inquiry."
March 8, 8 p. m. (room 43): American Horticultural Society.
lecture by Edwin C. Powell on "Grapes for the home garden."
March 10 and 15, 3.30 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School.
Addresses by Dr. J. M. Aldrich on Insects."

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March 15, 8 p. m. (auditorium): The Botanical Society of Washington. Addressed by Dr. E. W. Berry on "The first land plants"; by C. C. Plitt on "The altitudinal distribution of lichens in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica"; and by B. E. Livingston on "The water supplying power as related to the condition of a lawn in Baltimore ", and by D. S. Johnson on 'Seventeen years of revegetation of a denuded tropical valley."

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March 16, 8 p. m. (room 43): The Wild Flower Preservation Society. Illustrated lecture by P. L. Ricker on "Native wild flowers."

March 17, 3 30 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School. Illustrated address by Dr. C. W. Stiles on "Hook worms."

March 17, 4.45 p. m. (room 43): Anthropological Society of Washington. Talk by M. W. Stirling on "The Stirling expedition into Dutch New Guinea." March 22, 3.30 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School. Address by Dr. Maurice C. Hall on "Treatment of hook-worm disease." March 24, 4 30 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School. Address by Dr. L. O. Howard on "Some of the men in the world who have done something worth while."

March 29, 8 p. m. (auditorium): Extension Work, United States Department of Agriculture. Address by Dr. L. O. Howard on "Research work in entomology."

March 31, 3.30 p. m. (room 43): Howard University Medical School. Address by Miss Doris M. Cochran on Reptiles."

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April 5, 11.30 a. m. (auditorium): Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Address by O. C. Bradeen of the Forest Service on “Supplies of the Forest Service."

April 5, 8 p. m. (auditorium): The Botanical Society of Washington. Illustrated lecture by Prof. J. H. Priestly, of the University of Leeds, England, on "Light and growth of plants."

April 9, 7.45 p. m. (auditorium): Fourth National Oratorical Contest and Second International Oratorical Contest. Orations delivered by pupils of private and parochial schools in the Washington Star area. Music rendered by the Powell Junior High School orchestra.

April 12, 4.45 p. m. (room 43): Society for Philosophical Inquiry.

April 12, 8 p. m. (room 43): American Horticultural Society. Illustrated lecture by P. H. Dorset, of the United States Department of Agriculture, on "Plant hunting in northeastern China."

April 16, 2.30 p. m. (room 43): Daughters of the American Revolution. April 19 to 21: District of Columbia Dental Society. Dental educational campaign for better teeth-better health. Auditorium used at regular intervals during daytime for exhibition of motion pictures, with music, illustrating how a child would feel whose teeth are in bad condition, and on the evening of the 19th for a meeting to award prizes for the winning dental poster and a play, by the pupils of Park View Public School, entitled “Bad baby molar." The auditorium lobby and the adjacent foyer also were utilized during this week for displaying special exhibits on the subject prepared by the United States Public Health Service, United States Army, United States Navy, Children's Bureau of the United States Department of Labor, Division of Physical Anthropology of the United States National Museum, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery of the University of Maryland, Public School Dental Clinic of the District of Columbia Health Department, District of Columbia Dental Hygienist Association, and the District of Columbia Dental Society.

April 20, 8 p. m. (auditorium): Washington Society of Engineers. Address by R. H. Sargent, United States Geological Survey, on "The Alaskan aerial survey expedition of 1926, under the leadership of Lieut. B. H. Wyatt, United States Navy," illustrated with motion pictures.

April 26, 2 p. m. (auditorium): District of Columbia Public Schools and United States Forest Service. Illustrated address by C. E. Rachford of the United States Department of Agriculture on "Growth and destruction of the forest."

April 26, 8 p. m. (auditorium): American Dairy Federation. Extension Work, United States Department of Agriculture. Addresses by R. W. Dunlap, Assistant Secretary, Department of Agriculture; by A. F. Woods on "Research work of the department"; and by Dr. J. N. Mohler on "Progress of T. B. eradication." Exhibition of motion pictures by Department of Agriculture motion-picture service.

April 30, 8 p. m. (auditorium): Daughters of the American Revolution, conservation and thrift committee. Illustrated lecture by Herbert N. Wheeler on The lure of the forest."

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May 3, 11.30 a. m. (auditorium): Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Exhibition of motion pictures illustrating the Alaskan fisheries, game and forest, and vocal music by employees of the service. May 4, 11.30 a. m. (auditorium): Fourth national oratorical contest and second international oratorical contest. Addresses by three competitorsJohn Oscar Bell, jr., William Alexander Loker, and Miss Bessie Cushrepresenting the Lee High School, Ballston, Va.; Leonard Hall School, Leonardtown, Md.; and Notre Dame Academy, Washington, D. C.

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May 5, 8 p. m. (room 43): The Entomological Society of Washington. dresses by C. F. White and W. E. Dove on "The creeping eruption"; and by P. W. Mason on "Discussion on the specialization of aphids from general feeders to monoxenous feeders."

May 10, 4.45 p. m.

May 10, 8 p. m. lecture by Dr. States."

May 14, 10 a. m.

(room 43): Society for Philosophical Inquiry.

(room 43): American Horticultural Society. Illustrated L. C. Corbett on "Production of vegetables in the United

(room 43): Girl Scouts.

May 18, 8 p. m. (auditorium): Washington Philatelic Society. Illustrated address by Capt. I. C. Aker, United States Army, on "The flight of United States Army airplanes to South America."

May 28, 7.30 a. m. (room 43): George Washington University students. Meeting under leadership of Dr. Paul Bartsch.

May 28, 3.30 p. m. (auditorium): Federal Post No. 824, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Annual Memorial Service. Address by Dr. A. F. Woods, and music by the Navy band.

June 1, 11.30 a. m. (auditorium): Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Illustrated address by E. E. Carter on "The Black Hills." June 2, 8 p. m. (room 43): The Entomological Society of Washington. Notes and exhibition of specimens.

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June 10, 3.30 p. m. (auditorium): Extension Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Illustrated lecture by Sir John Russell, director of the Rothamsted Experiment Station, England, on Soils and plants." June 16 to 23: Extension Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Conference of the National Farm Boys and Girls 4-H Club. Auditorium used for 10 general sessions and room 43 for 6 conferences of State leaders and special committee meetings. The program included an address of welcome by Hon. W. M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture; addresses by Mrs. Maole Walker Willebrandt, Assistant Attorney General; Dr. William M. Mann, director of the National Zoological Park; J. J. Tigert, United States Commissioner of Education; Hon. J. B. Aswell of Louisiana, and Dr. W. S. Abernethy, and an exhibition of motion pictures of birds. June 20, 9.50 a. m. (room 43): Federal Agricultural Board, United States Department of Agriculture. Public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the State of Texas on account of the Morelos orange worm. June 23, 8 p. m. (auditorium): Finals in the third annual national spelling bee under the auspices of the Courier-Journal, Louisville, Ky., and 16 associated newspapers, presided over by Hon. John H. Bartlett, First Assistant Postmaster General. First prize was won by Dean Lucas, of West Salem, Ohio.

The American Association of Museums.-The twenty-second annual meeting of the American Association of Museums convened in Washington, D. C., from May 23 to 25, 1927. The opening session on the forenoon of May 23 was held in one of the graphic art exhibition halls of the National Museum in the Smithsonian Building, where a temporary meeting place was arranged. This session was devoted to the subject "National problems of museums." The president of the association, Chauncey J. Hamlin, presided, and the delegates were welcomed by the Acting Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Dr. C. G. Abbot, who then addressed the assembly on

"The relation of the National Museum to the museums of the Nation." Paul M. Rea, director of The Cleveland Museum of National History, presented the report of the committee on museum finance. Other sessions of the convention were held elsewhere.

Receptions.-Three evening receptions were held in the Museum during the year.

The first floor of the Natural History Building was thrown open for a reception on September 14, 1926, to delegates to the Seventh International Conference of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and to members of the diplomatic corps of the countries belonging to the union. This followed the lecture by M. le Prince Ginori Conti earlier in the evening in the auditorium. Dr. William J. Hale, of the National Research Council, was in charge of the arrangements. Dr. Alexander Wetmore, assistant secretary, represented the Smithsonian Institution on the receiving line.

On April 19, 1927, the National Gallery of Art and the other halls on the first floor of the Natural History Building were the setting for a reception to the Daughters of the American Revolution who were gathering in Washington for their annual convention. Music for the occasion was furnished by the Army band.

On the evening of June 20, 1927, the exhibition halls on the first and second floors of the Natural History Building were opened for a reception to the delegates and guests of the First International Congress of Soil Science, the Acting Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Dr. C. G. Abbot, heading the receiving line.

CHANGES IN ORGANIZATION AND STAFF

The organization of the Museum remained unchanged throughout the year, but the changes in the scientific staff included the loss. of several prominent scientists.

In the department of anthropology, Thomas D. Stewart temporarily served as aid in the division of physical anthropology from December 1, 1926, to March 1, 1927, when he was permanently appointed to the position. The appointment of Dr. George Grant MacCurdy as collaborator in anthropology was extended for one year from March 1, 1927. Miss Isobel H. Lenman, of Washington, D. C., who has long been a benefactor of the national collections, was made collaborator in ethnology on March 30, 1927. Neil M. Judd, curator of American archeology, was on furlough from the Museum from July 1 to October 31, 1926, and during June, 1927, to direct explorations of the National Geographic Society.

In the department of biology Miss Doris M. Cochran was advanced from aid to assistant curator in the division of reptiles and batrachians on March 1, 1927. On December 11, 1926, A. Brazier Howell, corresponding secretary of the American Society of Mam

malogists, was appointed collaborator in the division of mammals; and Albert C. Smith was given a similar appointment in the division of plants for one year from October 1, 1926.

In the department of geology Miss Margaret W. Moodey's title was changed on July 1, 1926, from recorder to aid; Dr. Paul Bartsch, curator of mollusks in the department of biology, was given appointment in the department of geology as curator of Cenozoic invertebrates from April 18, 1927; and Dr. Joseph A. Cushman, who has long worked on the national collections, was appointed collaborator in the division of stratigraphic paleontology for six months from May 10, 1927.

In the department of arts and industries, Carl W. Mitman was on furlough from July 1 to December 31, 1926, assisting in development of plans for an industrial museum for New York City, though he spent the week ends in Washington and continued general oversight of the work of the divisions of mineral and mechanical technology. R. C. Smith, aid in the division of graphic arts, was granted furlough for one year from October 8, 1926, to accept the assistant secretaryship of the American Association of Museums.

The Museum was deprived by death of several important members of its scientific staff, all of whom had long been associated with the Museum. They were Dr. Charles D. Walcott, keeper of the Museum; Dr. William H. Dall, honorary curator of mollusks and associate curator of Cenozoic collection; Dr. Frank H. Knowlton, custodian of mesozoic plants; Dr. Paul Haupt, associate in historic archeology. The death of George C. McClain, for over 40 years a member of the mechanical force of the Museum, came during the year.

Dr. Frank H. Knowlton, paleobotanist of the United States Geological Survey and custodian of mesozoic plants in the United States National Museum, died on November 22, 1926. He was born in Brandon, Vt., September 2, 1860, and graduated at Middlebury College in that State in 1884. He was a born naturalist, publishing his first paper, A List of the Birds of Brandon, Vt., in 1878. Shortly after graduation he entered the employ of the National Museum, first being appointed aid in the old division of fossil and recent plants under Dr. L. F. Ward, and in 1887 being advanced to assistant curator of fossil plants. After several summer's field work with United States Geological Survey parties he began to turn his attention more particularly to fossil forms and made his first contribution in 1888, a description of the silicified woods of Araucarioxylon arizonicum in the celebrated fossil forest in Arizona. In 1889 he was appointed assistant paleontologist on the survey, where he remained during the rest of his life, with the exception of a brief

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