Peter's letters to his kinsfolk [signed Peter Morris], 2nd ed, Volume 2

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Page 81 - ... conquest art; And, for ivy round his dart, The reformed god now weaves A finer thyrsus of thy leaves. Scent to match thy rich perfume Chemic art did ne'er presume Through her quaint alembic strain, None so sov'reign to the brain.
Page 289 - Sunbeams, upon distant hills Gliding apace, with shadows in their train, Might, with small help from fancy, be transformed Into fleet Oreads sporting visibly. The Zephyrs fanning, as they passed, their wings, Lacked not, for love, fair objects whom they wooed With gentle whisper. Withered boughs grotesque, Stripped of their leaves and twigs by hoary age, From depth of shaggy covert peeping forth In the low vale, or on steep mountain...
Page 279 - ... behold a wonder ! they but now who seemed in bigness to surpass earth's giant sons, now less than smallest dwarfs in narrow room throng numberless...
Page 288 - In that fair Clime, the lonely Herdsman, stretched On the soft grass through half a summer's day, With music lulled his indolent repose : And, in some fit of weariness, if he, When his own breath was silent, chanced to hear A distant strain, far sweeter than the sounds Which his poor skill could make, his Fancy fetched, Even from the blazing Chariot of the Sun, A beardless Youth, who touched a golden lute, And filled the illumined groves with ravishment...
Page 11 - silent finger points to Heaven ; Nor wanting, at wide intervals, the bulk Of ancient Minster, lifted above the cloud Of the dense air, which town or city breeds To intercept the sun's glad beams...
Page 198 - Gabriel was a preacher or licentiate of the Kirk, employed as domestic tutor in a gentleman's family in Edinburgh, where he had for pupils two fine boys of eight or ten years of age. The tutor entertained, it seems, some partiality for the Abigail of the children's mother ; and it so happened that one of his pupils observed him kiss the girl one day in passing through an anteroom, where she was sitting. The little fellow carried this interesting piece of- intelligence to his brother, and both of...
Page 279 - So thick the aery crowd Swarmed, | and were straitened ;] till, the signal given, Behold a wonder !] They) but now who seemed In bigness to surpass Earth's giant sons, | Now less) than smallest dwarfs...
Page 200 - Edinburgh now stands, was then considered as the country by the people of Edinburgh. After passing calmly, to all appearance, through several of the green fields, which have now become streets and squares, he came to a place more lonely than the rest, and there drawing a large clasp-knife from his pocket, he at once stabbed the elder of his pupils to the heart. The younger boy gazed on him for a moment, and then fled with shrieks of terror ; but the murderer pursued with the bloody knife in his hand,...
Page 321 - The varying light deceived thy sight, And the wild winds drown'd the name ; For the Dryburgh bells ring, and the white monks do sing, For Sir Richard of Coldinghame...
Page 187 - Miscellany ; so that he is of course a mighty favourite with the proprietor, and I could not have made my introduction under better auspices than his. The length of vista presented to one on entering the shop, has a very imposing effect ; for it is carried back, room after room, through various gradations of light and shadow, till the eye cannot trace distinctly the outline of any object in the furthest distance. First, there is as usual a spacious place set apart for...

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