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the .penult of the word must be short, if the canon about contraction before quoted be true, (of which there can be little doubt) we are strongly inclined to believe, that the passage in the Cyclops is correct. The MSS. from which Aldus printed his edition, evidently read it thus.

Besides, there is another very strong reason why the line ought not to be read,

άλλα καμμέν γλώσσα έαγε, λέπτον δ'. By this alteration, granting for a while that the final elision is allowable, there is a word totally expunged, which is of high importance in its place, and which Catullus (if we may judge from his translation) read in his copy,

άλλα καμμέν γλώσσέαγ. ΑΝ δε λέπτον

αυτίκα χρω πύρ υποδεδρόμακεν»is the reading of Stephens, and of the carliest editions : Stephens, it appears, is the only man who knew any thing about the matter, as he has clearly shown by his accentuation of ’AN; Toup, we fear, (“ pace tanti viri dicatur”) passed over the word in silence, not knowing what to make of it ; according to his accentuation,

"ΑΝ δε λέπτον
αυτίκα χρω πύρ υποδεδεόμακεν».
We should translate, “ atque illicò subtilis ignis sensim cutem
meam subiisset ;" which was evidently not Sappho's meaning.
The av, which is to be referred to xgw, is a fragment of the
preposition avá, and often stands before an initial consonant:
thus in Homer :
Βηρή μεν "AN 1 τε μάχης και 'ΑΝΑ κλόνον εγχειάων.

Iliad, r. 319.
And again,
Στησόμεθ' 'ΑΝ πύργους.

E. 278.
And in Pindar,

Ει δε τετραπται
Θεοδότων έργων κέλευθον 'ΑΝ καθαράν. Isthm. V. 28.

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It may be needless to say, that "AN, in this case, receives its accent from the enclitic Tin

In the passage before us, ’AN signifies UP and THROUGHOUT, viz. FROM TOP TO BOTTOM; so in the beginning of the Iliad;

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ο γαρ βασιλή χολωθείς Νούσον 'ΑΝΑ στρατόν ώρσε κακήν, δ. δ. λ. And again ;

'Εννήμαρ μεν 'ΑΝΑ στρατόν ώχετο κηλά θεοίο,

Where we should render ’ANA in English by right through, viz. from top to bottom, so as to leave no part untouched : AN xã therefore signifies, right through my body, i. e. so that every part was affected.

On the supposition that this difficulty is removed, there remains no objection on the score of any other line in the fragments of Sappho, so that. with considerable security we may lay down the following canon ;

“ In Greek Sapphic verse, no final elision, either of a monosyllable or polysyllable is allowed, except in the third line."

In the Ode of Erinne, (who was cotemporary with Sappho,) there is not the slightest shadow of an instance; and from the general strain of Greek poetry, we know that the Greeks were much more chary of final elisions than the Latins; the latter admit them even in Heroics, whereas (if we mistake not) the former have not a single instance, where either a monosyllable or a polysyllable is elided at the end of an hexameter line.

As to the hiatus, of which our Editor complains so much ; « Vocalium hiatus nimis licenter quidam admiserunt; quod in constrictis hujusmodi metris minùs rectè fieri judicamus ;"we certainly agree with him, as far as single vowels are concerned; but our opinion is, that where a final diphthong precedes an initial vowel, it is uniformly short, and that instances of this kind ought to be avoided no more in Greek Sapphics than in Greek Heroics.

Thus, in the fragment preserved by Longinus, we have daívouAI "ATVOUS; and in an extract from Sappho, found in Macrobius's Saturnal. book v. §. 21.

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-XAĽ "Esißov, ápá

σαντο δε πάντες 'Εσλα τα γαμβρώ. Which, when regularly arranged, evidently forms part of two Sapphic stanzas.

But our Editor has been negligent here as well as elsewhere; and the whole clause, from « Nobis," down to “ decurrunt,” seems to have been written purposely to introduce the flashing emendation by means of the Æolic digamma; which Brunck knew was necessary here, as well as either our Editor, or Terentianus Maurus. Much better would his time have been employed, if he had turned over the leaves of more useful books than Terentianus Maurus, from which he might have extracted what would have been beneficial to the “ Scriptores Sapphicorum carminum.”

Had he favored us with a scale of the metre, showing what syllables are admissible in different places, (the initial ditrochæus by the way, which in one fragment of Sappho occurs eight times within the space of seven stanzas, he never once mentions :) how the pauses should be varied, what forms are peculiar to Sappho, what may be introduced from other authors, under what restrictions the break and elision at the end of the third line should be used, and a few other necessary points, we might have thanked him for the little exertion requisite, and have excused his Latinity, had it not been quite so elegant, so

inops rerum,” provided a certain proportion of beneficial instruction had been blended with it.

At present we have nothing more to say on the subject, except that traces of similar imperfection and inaccuracy may be found in tolerable abundance throughout the whole of the Preface; some of which have been discussed by a learned Reviewer, (Quarterly Review, Art. vii.) We shall content ourselves with wishing, that in case our Editor should have to superintend the publishing of the remaining compositions, as he seems to intimate in p. ii. of his Preface; “ Diu multùmque

nobis cogitantibus tandem visum est non omnia simul in lucem edere, sed potiùs carminum fasciculum, quem si placidâ fronte exceperit juventus nostra studiosa, reliqua etiam, et præclara quidem ea, aliquando edi fortè possint ;" he will either give us a correct and complete account of what he purposes to serve up as a dessert to the young imitators of Sappho (“quæ Sapphicorum, ut aiunt, carminum scriptoribus fructui sint,” Pref. p. iv.) or will at all events favor us with a total silence.

Such is our creed on the subject, and as such we give it to the public : if, however, the reasons which we have adduced, and the grounds which we have gone upon, should appear censurable, either to the Editor, or to any other person, we shall be very happy to receive any objections to our opinion through the medium of the Journal; when we shall be pleased to admit or applaud them in the same proportion that they are decisive or specious.

M. D.

July 18. 1811.

GREEK INSCRIPTION.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE CLASSICAL JOURNAL.

SIR,

I shall be happy in supplying occasionally the pages of your Journal with some Inscriptions, chiefly Greek, copied by me in Asia Minor and Greece, in the years 1806 and 1807, and which have never yet been printed. I shall subjoin a few explanatory remarks.

ROBERT WALPOLE.

Tilbuster Lodge, Godstone,

Surry, July 30.

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Greek Inscription, in a Turkish Cemetery, close to Guzel

Hissar, the antient Tralles.

Τ Η ΙΓΛΥ ΚΥ ΤΑΤΗ ΙΠ Α Τ Ρ ΙΔΙ
M APAΥΡΑ ΝΑΡ Ε Α Σ Σ Υ Ν
ΤΗ ΓΥ Ν Α Ι Κ Ι Κ Λ. Θ Ε Ο Δ Ω Ρ
Α ΚΑΙ Τ Ο Ι Σ ΠAI ΣΙΝ
ΙΟΥΛ Ι Α Ν Ω Ι Α Ν Δ Ρ Ε Α
Θ Ε Ο Δ Ω Ρ Ω Τ Ο Υ Σ
Ε Π Ι Χ Ρ Υ Σ Ο Υ Σ Ε Ρ Ω
Τ Α Σ Η Κ Α ΙΤ Α Σ Β
Ν Ε Ι Κ Α Σ ΣΥΝΤ ΑΙΣ
ΒΑ ΣΕ ΣΙ Ν Ε Κ Τ Ω Ν
ΙΔΙΩ Ν Α Ν Ε Θ Η Κ Ε Ν.

“ M. Aurelius Andreas, with his wife Theodora, and his

children Julianus, Andreas, Theodorus, has consecrated to his beloved country, at his own expence, the 18 golden

Loves, and 2 Victories, with their bases." I have supplied the first and last letters of the first line, as they are erased from the marble, which now stands, as a tomb stone, in the Cemetery, as you approach Guzel-Hissar from the East. Dr. Chandler thought this place was the antient Magnesia ad Mæandrum: this is not true; it was Tralles.

The basė, as well as what was placed on it, is frequently mentioned in Inscriptions; thus in Gruter MXviii. 3. « Genium cum basi marmoreâ.” In Gudius, Inscrip. Ant. vi. 5. “ signum æreum cum basi marmorea.” Dorville has observed, that the base and foundation of the building are mentioned sometimes; as in Vignolius, cum basi et hypobasi ; and in the Marm. Campano, we read, cum basi et epistyl :

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