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PAGE.

A Sequel to Sir W. Drummond's Remarks on the Inscriptions

found at Ancient Saguntum,

263

Biblical Criticism,

273

On the Originality of the Classic Writers,

275

On the Lyrical Metres of Anacreon, No. II.

280

MSti in Coll. SS. Trin. Cant. Collatio ; " De Senectute"

Ciceronis,

301

MSti in Coll. SS. Trin. Cant. Collatio ; De Amicitia

Ciceronis,

304

Critical Remarks on Dr. A. Clarke's Annotations on the Bible,

307

Oratio de Lingua Arabice Antiquitate, Præstantiâ, et Utilitate, 320

An Essay, descriptive of the Chart of Ten Numerals in two

Hundred Languages; (printed in the last Number of the

CLASSICAL JOURNAL,)

327

Persii et Catonis MStorum Collatio,

353

Augustissimo, Potentissimoque Principi ac Domino Carolo II.

Magna Britanniæ, Francia, et Hibernice, Regi, Fidei defen-

sori, &c. Dedicatio-Waltoni,

355

Templi Jovi Olympio ab Agrigentinis dicati demolitio. Lat.

Poem,

362

Remarks on Sir W. Drummond's Version of some Egyptian

Names in the Old Testament, No. II.

369

Oxford Prize Poem, for 1811.-" Herculaneum,”

375

Sophronis Mimorum Fragmenta, No. I.

380)

Oxford Prize Essay, for 1811.--- Funeral and Sepulchral

Honors,"

391

On Hebrew Numerals and different modes of Notation, No. 1. 401

Inscriptions,

406

Defence of Sir W. Drummond on the Egyptian Names in the

Old Testament,

407

What were the Cherubim ?

416

Anticritical Remarks on the 1st and 2d Chapters of the Prophet

Isaiah,

422

Critical and Explanatory Notes on the Prometheus Desmotes

of Æschylus, with Strictures on the Notes and the Glossary

to Mr. Blomfield's edition, No. III.

425

Etymology,

437

487

Thoughts on the perusal of the Rev. F. Wrangham's Sermon,

on the best method of translating the Christian Scriptures

into the Language of India and the East,

438

Remarks on H. Stephens' Greek Thesaurus, ...

443

Cambridge Latin Prize Essay, for 1809,

446

Remarks on the Antique Ring,

454

Bibliography,

455

Inscription, No. 11. ..

456

Homer Illustrated,

457

In Æschyli Cantus Choricos Tentaminis novi Specimen, No. 1. 459

Imposition of Hands considered as a Mark of Favor in the

East, applied to the Illustration of Scripture,

465

Remarks on Sir W. Drummond's derivation of the word

“ Pharoah,”

468

On the Vulgate Bible of 1450-1455.

471

To the Rev. Mr. Maurice, on Pagan Trinities ; including

Remarks on Passages of Herodotus, of Valerius Maximus,

and of Pausanias. LETTER III.

Sending Portions to those, for whom nothing is prepared,

explained by referring to Eastern Travellers,

Inscription on a Monumental Urn in a Grove at W************ 489

Amico meo Hypercritico, J-

G--- M. D.--

Fabula

Phædriana,

ib.

An Account of an Antique Metal Figure, found at Silchester,

in Hampshire ; with Remarks on the Diï Penates of the

Romans,

490

Plan and Specimen of Biblia-Polyglotta-Britannica, or an

enlarged and improved edition of the London-Polyglott-Bible;

with Castell's Heptaglott Lexicon,

493

Inscription, Oriental,

498

Notice of Mr. Dibdin's Bibliomania,

499

Classical Criticism,

501

Notice of the Appendix to Dr. Valpy's Sermons,

503

Letter from the Right Hon. Lord Grenville, on the subject of

“il. Stephens' Greek Thesaurus,"

513

Extract of a Letter from the Rev. James Tate to the Editor, 515

Critical Review of Illustrations of Homer," published in

No. VI. No. 1.

517

On the Jaloff Language,

520

Literary Intelligence,

522

Notes to Correspondents,

525

Index to Vois. and of the CLASSICAL JOURNAL,

527

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THE

CLASSICAL JOURNAL.

'N°. VII.

SEPTEMBER, 1811,

A New Translation of obscure Passages in the Bible.

No. I.

To illustrate and elucidate the Classics, verbal and minute criticism, and improved translation have been applied with fine effect; and why should we not apply them to the word of God? Now, although the common, or national, translation of the Bible, be admitted to be excellent in many passages, yet every pious and intelligent reader will confess, that many hundred verses in Job, in Hosea, in all the minor Prophets, in the Song of Solomon, and Ecclesiastes, require amendment, perspicuity, and an improved translation. These were the modest sentiments, and this was the diffident proposal, of Dr. Grey, in his

Key to the Old Testament.” This is the important subject of many sermons, and of many treatises, which have been expressly written for the purpose, by bishops, by translators, by Orientalists, and by commentators. Their arguments for a revisal of the vulgar translation receive new strength from every modern and novel translation of any individual book in the Scriptures. Their reasonings are yet more confirmed by the

Vol. IV, No. vii,

new travels and voyages into the East, or into Palestine, or even into India and China, those patriarchal, primitive, and pastoral nations ; for these voyagers cast a flood of light on the similar pastoral and patriarchal habits of the Israelites. As proficients in the Asiatic tongues and dialects, which bear an affinity to the Hebrew and the Chaldee, the moderns far excel our venerable translators in the age of either Elizabeth or James: as adepts in Rabbinical literature, and in Jewish idioms, they are enabled to detect, and to elicit, the true meaning, and the obvious sense, of many a verse, which had perplexed our early translators. I propose to copy a few instances of such verses, and of their old and their new translation; and shall submit them to the serious and profound meditation of the real Christian. The word of God is too solemn a book to be lightly altered; but every rational improvement of the sense will be eagerly adopted; for, if the trumpet give an uncertain sound, is it the “ trumpet of God?” To adopt the words of Paul, in I. Cor. xiv. 6. &c. “ Speaking in any tongue, what does it profit, except I speak to you to make you to know truths in an intelligible manner. Even inanimate instruments, a pipe, or a harp, giving out sound, except they give a distinguishable sound, how shall be known the object of the tune of that harp or pipe ? So likewise, except ye write, or utter, words easy to be understood, how shall it be known what is spoken ? for ye speak to the air. There are many tongues in the world, and none of them is without a meaning; but, if I know not the nieaning of that language, he that speaketh it is a barbarian and a foreigner to me: I had rather speak five words which were intelligible, and by them teach others, than ten thousand words, which could not be understood.” We may evidently apply these sensible remarks of the inspired St. Paul to the prophetical and poetic parts, in particular, of the Bible; parts, in truth, the most beautiful, though in the common translation, the most obscure, mistaken, and misapprehended, of all the Scriptures; for, in the class of spiritual poetry, what works of merit has England or modern Europe produced, which may be compared with the finished strains of David and Asaph, with the temporary effusions of the minor prophets, or with the magnificent visions of the greater? It is indeed a singular phenomenon, that the Jewish bards, and

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