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Dr. Sims introduces his paper by flat. ing, as a motive for its publication, his having seen an account of a trial for a ca. pital offence, in which the learned Judge pronounced, that “no homicide could be deemed insane who knew that it was a man, and not a dog or cat, that he killed.” Whatever this gentleman might be in law, he was certainly no judge in medicine,

After having noticed the imperfection of all previous definitions of insanity, the author proceeds to advance one which, I should imagine, was peculiar to himself, In order to escape any imputation of unfairness, it may be proper to quote literally,

and in connection, the ‘whole of what it is

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in the course of the year.” So generally, and to an extent so unlimited, as it there is Hated, I suspećt the evil did not in the worst of times prevail : for to me it appears probable, that among the common people the dreadful habit of drunkenness or bacchic furor was confined to the towns; from the mannels of which travellers in general, more than from those of the country, draw conclusions in forming their judgments of a nation: and we ought always to keep this circumstance in view, if we would avoid too haftily adopting unfounded opinions concerning the national chara&ter of the Russians. The traveller who should form his opinion of the lower orders in England or France from the populace of London and Paris,

would commit an egregious mistake: but

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