Memoirs of the Life of Anthony Benezet

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Re-printed, with additions, etc. for W. Alexander, and sold by him; also by Darton, Harvey; and Company, W. Phillips, and W. Darton, Jun., 1817 - 156 pages
Includes letters by Benezet, on education, slavery, treatment of Indians, war, etc.
 

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Page 66 - Is it not amazing that, at a time when the rights of humanity are defined and understood with precision, in a country above all others fond of liberty, that, in such an age, and...
Page 55 - Princes shall come out of Egypt ; Ethiopia shall soon stretch out her hands unto God.
Page 98 - Parents were separated from children, and husbands from wives, some of whom have not to this day met again ; and we were so crowded in the transport vessels, that we had not room even for all our bodies to lay down at once, and consequently were prevented from carrying with us proper necessaries, especially for the support and comfort of the aged and weak, many of whom quickly ended their misery with their...
Page 66 - Would any one believe that I am master of slaves of my own purchase ? I am drawn along by the general inconvenience of living without them. I will not, I cannot, justify it...
Page 67 - I believe a time will come when an opportunity will be offered to abolish this lamentable evil. Everything we can do is to improve it, if it happens in our day ; if not, let us transmit to our descendants, together with our slaves, a pity for their unhappy .lot, and an abhorrence for slavery.
Page 28 - I can with truth and sincerity declare, that I have found amongst the negroes as great variety of talents, as among a like number of whites ; and I am bold to assert, that the notion entertained by some that the blacks are inferior in their capacities, is a vulgar prejudice founded on the pride or ignorance of their lordly masters, who have kept their slaves at such a distance as to be unable to form a right judgment of them.
Page 65 - I thank you for it. It is not a little surprising, that the professors of Christianity, whose chief excellence consists in softening the human heart, in cherishing and improving its finer feelings, should encourage a practice so totally repugnant to the first impressions of right and wrong.
Page 46 - African slave trade, there is much reason to apprehend that this has been, and as long as the evil exists, will continue to be, an occasion of drawing down the Divine displeasure on the nation and its dependencies. May these considerations induce thee to interpose thy kind endeavours...
Page 47 - by whom kings reign, and princes decree justice," to avert the awful judgments by which the empire has. already been so remarkably shaken ; but that the blessings of thousands ready to perish may come upon thee, at a time when the superior advantages attendant on thy situation in this world, will no longer be of any avail to thy consolation and support.
Page 66 - I will not, I cannot justify it. However culpable my conduct, I will so far pay my devoir to virtue, as to own the excellence and rectitude of her precepts, and lament my want of conformity to them.

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