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THE Science of Medicine, if it be destitute

and forsaken by Natural Philosophy, is not much better than an empirical practice. — BACON, Advancement of Learning, Bk. 2.

Medicine, — the art of preserving health, of prolonging life, of curing diseases, and of making death easy. — J. GREGORY, M.D., Office and Duties of a Physician, Lect. 4.

It is to be observed, however, that as a Science is conversant about knowlege only, an art is the application of knowlege to practice. — ARCHBISHOP WHATELY, Elements of Logic, Bk. II, Ch. 1. $ 2, note.

Of those passions which are or deserve to be the subject of legal and judicial tragedy, the Lawyers necessarily see most; and for this reason perhaps they think worse of human nature than any other class of men, except the Roman Catholic Clergy. Physicians on the contrary, though they see humanity in its most humiliating state, see it also in the exercise of its holiest and most painful duties. No other persons witness such deep emotions and such exertions of self-control. They know what virtues are developed by the evils which flesh is heir to, what self-devotion, what patience, what fortitude, what piety, what religious resignation. — SOUTHEY, The Doctor, Ch. 119.

To a Physician the study of his Science is a long and pleasing investigation of the most interesting and secret parts of Philosophy; and its practice a perpetual exercise of skill and charity, of the noblest faculties of reason, and of the cardinal virtues of the heart. – J. BELL, Letters to Dr. Gregory, IX, p. 212.

Medicus est vir artis Medicæ summè gnarus, modestus, sobrius, et humanus. * * J. C. Scaliger hoc modo Medicum rectè descripsisse videtur, quod oportet esse virum doctum, probum, lenem, diligentem, maturum, fortunatum, Deo fretum, non suâ, vel scientiâ, vel operâ, vel successu tumidum, aut pecuniæ deditum.— BLANCARD, Lexicon Med.

A doubtful art, a knowlege still unknown, which enters but the heavy heads alone of those who, broken with unthankful toyle,

seek others health, and lose their own the while. MS. note on the fly-leaf of LACUNA's Epitome of Galen, in New Coll., Oxford; Lancet, 21 July 1849.

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“Are we sufficiently thankful?” — said Dr. H**. -“Obviously not,” — said ** ***** ******, when I repeated the remark to him.

However imperfect may be the sciences belonging to the Healing art, to bring them even to their present state has been the work of centuries. — SIR B. BRODIE, Introductory Discourse, 1843.

There is no short cut, nor "Royal road,” to the attainment of medical knowlege. The path which we have to pursue is long, difficult, and unsafe. In our progress we must frequently take up our abode with death and corruption; we must adopt loathsome diseases for our familiar associates, or we shall never be thoroughly acquainted with their nature and dispositions; we must risk, nay even injure, our own health, in order to be able to preserve or restore that of others. Yet if we do this, our profession will be held in the highest respect; not as in ancient times, merely on account of the beneficence of its object, but because it will be further perceived that the means are adequate to its accomplishment. — J. ABERNETHY, Hunterian Oration.

But in order to obtain that personal acquaintance with your Patient which is often so absolutely essential to your treating his malady with success, you must take a real interest in him and all that concerns him; an interest different from, and far deeper than, that with which you would regard him, if looked at merely as an object of scientific enquiry. It must be an interest in him as a fellowman, bound to the world by like ties with yourselves; the sharer in the same hopes and fears, and heir to the same immortality. — C. WEST, M.D., Address at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, 1850.

Human nature must be intimately studied, to acquire that full ascendancy over the prejudices, the caprices and the passions of the sick and of their relatives, which is essential to medical success. — T. PERCIVAL, M.D., Medical Ethics, Ch. 1, § 26.

Ye know very well, Alan, that in the other faculty who study the ars medendi, before the young Doctor gets to the bedsides of palaces, he must, as they call it, walk the Hospitals; and cure Lazarus of his sores, before he be admitted to prescribe for Dives, when he has gout or indigestion :- also the Chirurgeons have a useful practice, by which they put their apprentices and tyrones to work upon senseless dead bodies, to which as they can do no good, so they certainly can do as little harm; while at the same time the tyro, or apprentice, gains experience, and becomes fit to whip off a leg or arm from a living subject, as cleanly as ye would slice an onion. — SIR W. SCOTT, Redgauntlet, Letter xiii.

The Surgeon who is engaged in operations must attend in all respects to his mode of life; and especially he should be of those moderate and temperate habits without which there can be no steady hand, no accurate eye; without which, also, there can not be that activity and energy of mind, and readiness of conduct, which are so necessary to enable him to meet the unforeseen difficulties that will continually arise in the greater, and sometimes even in the smaller, operations of surgery. — SIR B. BRODIE, Illustrations of Circumstances connected with Operative Surgery, Works, iii. 418.

THE SURGEON'S PRAYER.

Merciful Father, who hast made all things with Thy word, and ordained Man through Thy wisdom, look down from Thy Holy Heavens, and from the throne of Thy Glory; Have mercy on my weakness, and so guide and govern my hand this day in the operation which I shall perform, that it may be blessed, both in the doing and in the effect.

The thoughts of mortal men are miserable, and our devices are but uncertain ; — If Thy wisdom be not with me, Lord, how shall the work of my hands prosper? · Let not, O Lord, any belief in my own skill, or any trust in help from man, in any way lessen my dependence on Thee ; but make me always to know and to feel that every good gift is from Thee, and that it is Thy Blessing alone which makes the means used to be effectual.

Hear me, O Merciful Father, for Jesus Christ's sake, — for the sake of Him who liveth and reigneth with Thee and the Holy Spirit, ever one God, world without end. Amen.

If the elder Daniel had thought that the moral feelings and religious principles of his son were likely to be endangered by the study of Medicine,

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