Medhurst on Atmospheric Railways

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Page 11 - ... of a plan, for the rapid conveyance of goods and passengers on an iron road, through a tube of 30 feet in area, by the power and velocity of air.' The calculations in this work are principally confined to the conveyance of carriages inside a tube ; but it also states that it may be practicable, on the same principle, to form a tube, so as to leave a constant communication between the inside and the outside of it, and by this means to impel carriages in the open air, with the advantage to passengers...
Page 1 - Calculations and remarks tending to prove the practicability, effects, and advantages of a plan, for the rapid conveyance of goods and passengers on an iron road, through a tube of 30 feet in area, by the power and velocity of air.
Page 15 - Second. Ditto, goods at the expense of one penny per ton per mile conveyance." " Third. The conveyance cannot be obstructed or impeded by frosts, snow, floods, or drought, nor endangered by darkness, or the weather...
Page 15 - ... and weight of the plate, and stop it close as before. Therefore, if there is a large and light iron wheel fixed in front of the interior carriage, and close to the side of the wall on which the plate shuts into the groove ; and if this wheel is planted to stand two inches higher than the underside of the covering plate, this wheel, as it passes along, will constantly lift up the plates, and make an opening of two inches wide, or more, and 8 or 10 feet long ; and when the wheel has passed, the...
Page 5 - ... tracks securely laid all along the bottom, for the wheels of the carriage to run upon , and the carriage must be nearly of the size and form of the canal, so as to prevent any considerable quantity
Page 17 - On the properties, power & application of the Aeolian engine. With a plan and particulars for carrying it into execution, upon a scale that will embrace all the principal objects to which it can be applied with full effect.
Page 15 - ... of one of the side walls, and made to shut down close upon a cast iron rail, laid firmly down upon the other side wall. " In order to make the plate shut down air-tight upon the cast iron rail, without being riveted to it, there should be a groove all along the top and inner edge of the cast iron rail, and a thin edge of iron, riveted to the plates all along, to fall into the groove; then, if the groove is partially filled with some soft yielding substance, as cork, hemp, wood, leather...
Page 15 - ... iron, riveted to the plates all along, to fall into the groove; then, if the groove is partially filled with some soft yielding substance, as cork, hemp, wood, leather, &c., the thin iron edge will bed itself into it, and shut so close, that the air will not escape, with so light a pressure as one pound per square inch." '' The plate that is to form the top of the canal being thus prepared, may be lifted up out of the groove two or three inches high, in any particular place of the side, which...
Page 11 - ... the same principle, to form a tube so as to leave a continual communication between the inside and the outside of it, without suffering any part of the impelling air to escape ; and by this means to impel a carriage along upon an iron road, in the open air, with equal velocity, and in a great degree possessing the same advantages as in passing withinside of the tube, with the additional satisfaction to passengers of being unconfined, and in view of the country.
Page 15 - Passengers may be conveyed to the greatest distance through the country with .ease and great safety at the rate of a mile in a minute, or fifty miles per hour upon an average, and at the expense of one farthing per mile. Second. All kind of portable goods, merchandize, manufacture, and produce, will be conveyed with the same velocity, at the expense of one penny per ton per mile conveyance.

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