The Works of William Cowper: Comprising His Poems, Correspondence and Translations, Volume 6

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Page 178 - JOHN GILPIN was a citizen Of credit and renown, A train-band captain eke was he Of famous London town. John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. To-morrow is our wedding-day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will £11 the chaise; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Page 183 - The wind did blow, the cloak did fly, Like streamer long and gay, Till, loop and button failing both, At last it flew away. Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung ; A bottle swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children screamed, Up flew the windows all; And every soul cried out, Well done!
Page 73 - Now came still Evening on, and Twilight gray had in her sober livery all things clad : Silence accompanied ; for Beast and Bird, they to their grassy couch, these to their nests, were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale; she, all night long, her amorous descant sung; Silence was pleased. Now...
Page 134 - And taught a brute the way to safe revenge. i would not enter on my list of friends (Though graced with polished manners and fine sense, * Yet wanting sensibility) the man Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
Page 66 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups, That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 41 - Adjoin'd, from each thing met conceives delight ; The smell of grain, or tedded grass, or kine, Or dairy, each rural sight, each rural sound...
Page 186 - And galloped off with all his might As he had done before. Away went Gilpin, and away Went Gilpin's hat and wig ; He lost them sooner than at first, For why ? they were too big. Now...
Page 184 - But yet his horse was not a whit Inclined to tarry there ; For why ? his owner had a house Full ten miles off at Ware.
Page 182 - John he cried, But John he cried in vain, That trot became a gallop soon In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both his hands, And eke with all his might.

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