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VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD,

AND VISITS TO

VARIOUS FOREIGN COUNTRIES,

IN THE

UNITED STATES FRIGATE COLUMBIA;

ATTENDED BY HER CONSORT

THE SLOOP OF WAR JOHN ADAMS,

AND COMMANDED BY

COMMODORE GEORGE C. READ.

ALSO INCLUDIXO

AN ACCOUNT OF THE BOMBARDING AND FIRING OF THE TOWN OP MUCKIE, ON THE MALAY
COAST, AND THE VISIT OF THE SHIPS TO CHINA DURING THE OPIUM DIFFICULTIES

AT CANTON, AND CONFINEMENT OF THE FOREIGNERS IN THAT CITY.

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NEW HAVEN:
PUBLISHED BY H. MANSFIELD

NEW-YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 200 BROADWAY.

KE 39

HARVARD
COLLEGE

LIBRARY

43 + Y4

Entered according to Act of Congress, by

H. MANSFIELD, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Connecticut

TO

Commodore George E. Read.

DEAR SIR:

The late East India Squadron, in its circuit of the world under your

command, has done honor to our country and professional credit to yourself. No voyage of equal length in distance and in time can be made, without encountering many hazards and circumstances of frequent difficulty. These have been met by yourself—the cruise successfully completed—and the purposes of the government accomplished. Though it has not been my design to enter into all the details of the cruise of the East India Squadron, its action will be found sufficiently developed in the succeeding pages for the general reader. But it is as an acknowledgment of the invariable courtesy, which I have received from yourself during the voyage which has originated the following pages, that I beg you to accept these volumes, with the assurances of my great respect and esteem.

Firch W. TAYLOR. New-YORK, October, 1840.

A

VOYAGE AROUND THE WORLD,

SECTION I.

The eve before sailing. View of the two ships from shore. A bright omen.

Author's adieus. The Lieutenant and miniature of his boy. An officer's farewell to his wife. Social sacrifices on the part of the officers of the Navy. The ships in the Roads. Lines to Mrs. R. The sailing of the ships from the Roads. Ships at sea.

I shall never forget the sunset scene of the last evening I spent on shore. The sky had been lowering with April showers, and the sun stood yet on his declining course behind the fleecy clouds, but, occasionally, broke forth again through the opening vistas of their dark layers, as if to assure us that life, even the most shaded, has its smiles as well as tears. The mild air, at this hour, touched the cheek as blandly as rests the head of lady on the down of velvet; and since the slight peals of thunder, which had rolled far off and high above the city, the clouds had parted ; and now, here and there, the blue distance beyond them was seen, in its deepness and beauty.

I went to call upon my friends. It was the last evening I could hope to meet them, before our ships would take their long course to distant seas. Besides, I had been thinking of other friends, and dearer kindred, whom I had already left to the chances of a world of change, until another three years, perhaps, should permit us again to meet.

It is at such a moment, when the reality nears us, we feel that there is sorrow in the parting of friends. Some foreboding thought, with its dark wing, will sail across the imagination, and leave the heart deeply sensible of the shadow it has cast. We may have much in our antici

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