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V.

ADVERTISEMENT

To the complete Edition of 1743.

I

HAVE long had a design of giving some fort

of Notes on the works of this poet. Before I had the happiness of his acquaintance, I had written a commentary on his Esay on Man, and have since finished another on the Elay on Criticism. There wasone already on the Dunciad, which had met with

general approbation : but I still thought some additions were wanting (of a more serious kind) to the humorous notes of Scriblerus, and even to those write ten by Mr. Cleland, Dr. Arbuthnot, and others. I had lately the pleasure to pass some months with the author in the country, where I prevailed upon him to do what I had long desired, and favour me with his explanation of several passages in his works. It happened, that just at that juncture was published a ridiculous book against him, full of Personal Reflections, which furnish'd him with a lucky opportunity of improving This Poem, by giving it the only thing it wanted, a more confiderable Here. He was always sensible of its defect in that particular, and

owned he had let it pass with the hero it had, parely for want of a better, not entertaining the least expectation that such an one was reserved for this post, as has since obtained the Laurel : But since that had happened, he could no longer deny this justice either to him or the Dunciad.

I will venture to say, there was another motive which had still more weight with our Author : This person was one, who from every Folly (not to fay Vice) of which another would be ashamed, has constantly derived a Vanity; and therefore was the man in the world who would leaft be burt by it.

W. W.

And yet

VI.

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Printed in the JOUR N A L S, 1730.

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HER E A S, upon occafion of certain Pieces

relating to the Gentlemen of the Dunciad, fome have been willlng to fuggeft, as if they looked upon them as an abuse : we can do no less than own, it is our opinion, that to call these gentlemen bad authors is no fort of abuse, but a great truth. We

cannot alter this opinion without some reason; but we promise to do it in respect to every person who thinks it an injury to be represented as no Wit, or Poet, provided he procures a Certificate of his being really such, from any three of his companions in the Dunciad, or from Mr. Dennis singly, who is esteemed equal to any three of the number.

VII.

A

PARALLEL

OF THE

CHARACTERS

OF

Mr. DR YDEN and Mr. POPE,

As drawn by certain of their Contemporaries.

Mr. DRY DEN,

His POLITICS, RELIGION, MORAL S.

MR:

R. Dryden is a mere renegado from monar

chy, poetry, and good sense a. A true republican son of monarchical Church b. A republican Atheist. Dryden was from the beginning

b

a Milbourn on Dryden's Virgil, 8vo. 1698. p. 6. pag. 38.

pag. 192.

VII.

A

PARALLEL

OF THE

CHARACTERS

OF

Mr. POPE and Mr. DR YDEN.

As drawn by certain of their Contemporaries.

Mr. P O PE,

His POLITICS, RELIGION, MORAL S.

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(R. Pope is an open and mortal enemy. to his

country and the commonwealth of learning. Some call him a popith whig, which is directly inconsistent b. Pope, as a Papist, must

a Dennis Rem, on the Rape of the Lock, Pref. p. xii, 1 Dunciad diffected,

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