The Dublin Review, Volume 13; Volume 65

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Nicholas Patrick Wiseman
Tablet Publishing Company, 1869

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Page 87 - And whosoever shall fall on this stone, shall be broken; but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder.
Page 64 - The object of this Essay is to assert one very simple principle, as entitled to govern absolutely the dealings of society with the individual in the way of compulsion and control, whether the means used be physical force in the form of legal penalties, or the moral coercion of public opinion. That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering...
Page 119 - The fellows or monks of my time were decent easy men, who supinely enjoyed the gifts of the founder : their days were filled by a series of uniform employments ; the chapel and the hall, the coffee-house and the common room, till they retired, weary and well satisfied, to a long slumber.
Page 472 - Is there no balm in Gilead ; is there no physician there ? why then is not the health of the daughter of my people recovered...
Page 64 - That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.
Page 70 - Despotism is a legitimate mode of government in dealing with barbarians, provided the end be their improvement, and the means justified by actually effecting that end. Liberty, as a principle, has no application to any state of things anterior to the time when mankind have become capable of being improved by free and equal discussion.
Page 269 - But he that is married, careth for the things that are of the world, how he may please his wife.
Page 136 - ... hidden beneath its words. It is the representative of his best moments, and all that there has been about him of soft and gentle and pure and penitent and good speaks to him for ever out of his English bible It is his sacred thing, which doubt has never dimmed, and controversy never soiled. In the length and breadth of the land there is not a protestant with one spark of religiousness about him, whose spiritual biography is not in his Saxon bible...
Page 136 - Bible is not one of the great strongholds of heresy in this country ? It lives on the ear, like a music that can never be forgotten, like the sound of church bells, which the convert hardly knows how he can forego.
Page 119 - I was admitted to the society of the fellows, and fondly expected that some questions of literature would be the amusing and instructive topics of their discourse. Their conversation stagnated in a round of college business, Tory politics, personal anecdotes, and private scandal : their dull and deep potations excused the brisk intemperance of youth ; and their constitutional toasts were not expressive of the most lively loyalty for the house of Hanover.

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