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oultry, and other of its uses, is also desired. t is known to be particularly serviceable in furnishing honey to bees. 40. RAI's ING GRAss SEEDs. To the person who shall raise the greatest quantity of each or any of the following named grass seeds, viz. —Meadow fox-tail (alopecurus pratensis), sweet-scented vernal grass (anthoxanthum odoratum), Timothy grass, meadow Fescue grass, smooth-stalked meadow grass (poa pratensis), rough-stalked meadow grass (poa trivialis); the silver medal, or ten guineas. It is required that certificates from persons who have viewed then in a proper state, to identify that they are one or other of the seeds above mentioned, indicating clearly the particular species, and noticing the quantity produced of such seeds, free from weeds or mixture of other grasses, together with proper samples of the seeds, be produced to the Society on or before the first dry of #.". 1805. 41. e same premium is extended one year farther. Certificates to be produced on or before the first day of February, 1806. 42. Rotation of Crops. To the person who shall, between the 10th of August, 1801, and the 10th of September, 1803, cultivate the greatest quantity of land, not less than forty acres, in the following rotation, viz. 1st, winter tares; 2d, turnips; and 3d, wheat; and apply the two former crops in the best and most farmer-like manner, to the rearing, supporting, and fattening horses, cattle, sheep, or hogs, on the land which produced the crops; the gold medal, or one hundred guineas. 43. For the next in quantity and merit, on ot less than thirty acres, the silver medal, or y guineas. 44. For the next in quantity and merit, on 3. less than twenty acres, the silver medal. is required, that every operation and expense be fully described, and that satisfactory certificates of the nature and condition of the soil on which the crops have grown, together with an account of their appearance, the number of horses and cattle, sheep or hogs, fed by the two green crops, and, as near as possible, the improved value of the live stock by the consumption of those crops, and also the quantity of wheat per acre, and its weight per bushel, be produced to the Society on or before the first day of November, 1804. It is presumed that very great advantages will arise to such agriculturists as shall adopt this rotation of crops on a dry soil. They will be enabled, with the addition of a few acres of turnip-rooted cabbage for spring-food, to keep such large flocks of sheep and herds of meat cattle as may secure a sufficient quantity of manure to fertilize their land in the highest degree, and in every situation. It is farther conceived, that wheats which will bear sowing

in the spring will be particularly suitable for this premium. 45, 46, 47. The same premiums are extended one year farther. Certificates to be delivered on or before the first day of November, 1805, 48. PRFsproving Tuns Ips. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and cheapest method of preserving turnips perfectly sound, and in every respect fit for the purpose of supporting and fattening sheep and neat cattle, during the months of February. March, and April; the silver medal, or ten guineas. It is required that a full and accurate account of the method employed, and the expense attending the process, together with certificates that the produce of four acres at the least have been preserved according to the method described, and applied to the feeding of sheep and neat cattle; that the whole were drawn out of the ground before the first day of February, in order to clear the greater part of it previous to its being prepared for corn, and to save the soil from being exhausted by the turnips; and also of the weight of an average sixteen perches of the crop ; be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in November, 1804. N.B. It is recommended to those who may be induced to try the necessary crocriments for obtaining this and the following four premiums, to consider the incthod comployed for thc preservation of potatoes in ridges (which the growers call pies), and also the propriety of adopting a similar method in cases where they are previously frozen. It is supposed that, in the latter instance, the addtion of ice or stoir, and the construction of the ridges upon a large scale, may be sufficient to preserve the freezing temperature till the vegetables are wanted for the use of cattle or sheep, at which time they may be thatred by immicrsion in cold water, and the rot which a sudden thau, produces may be prevented. 49. For the next in quantity and merit, on not less than two acres, the silver medal. 50. Profs F.R v ING CApr; A G s. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and cheapest method of preserving drumheaded cabbages perfectly sourd, and in every respect sit for the purpose of supporting and fattening sheep and meat cattle during the months of February, March, and April; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. 51. For the next in quantity and merit, on not less than two acres, the silver medal or fifteen guineas. Conditions the same as for preserving turnips, Cl. 18. And the aqcounts to be produced on or before the first Tuesday in November, 1805. 52. PRFs enviso CAR Rots, PARsNirs, on BEFTs. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and cheapest method of preserving carrots, parsnips, or beets, perfectly sound, and in every respect fit for the purpose of supporting horses, and fattening sheep and reat cattle, during the months of February, March, and April; the silver medal, or fifteen guineas. Conditions the same as for preserving turnips, Cl, 48. And the accounts to be delivered in on or before the first day in November, 1805. 53. Pros frviso Potators. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and cheapest method of preserving potatoes, two or more years, perfectly sound, without vegetating, and in every other respect fit for the purpose of sets and the use of the table, and, consequently, of supporting and fattening cattle; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. It is required, that a full and accurate account of the method employed, and the expense attending the process, with certificates that one hundred bushels at the least have been preserved according to the method described, and that one or more bushels of the same potatoes have been set, and produced a crop without any apparent diminution of their vegetative power, and also that they have been used at table, with entire satisfaction to the person who ate of them, together with a sample of one bushel, be sent to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in November, 1805. 54. MARING MEADow-IIAY IN wrot WEATiirn. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and cheapest nethod, superior to any hitherto practised, of making meadow-hay in wet weather; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. A full account of the method employed, and of the expense attending the process, with not loss than fifty-six pounds

of the hay ; and certificates that at least the

produce of six acres of land has been made according to the method described, and that the whole is of equal quality with the sample; to he produced on or before the first Tuesday in January, 1805. w 55. HAR v Esrt N. c. Cop N N wrt WEAT1: Fr. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best old cheapest method, superior to any hitherto proctised, of harvesting corn in wet weather : the gold medal, or thirty guineas. A full account of the method employed, and of the expense attending the process, with not less than two sheaves of the corn, and certificates that at least the produce of ten acres has been harvested according to the method described, and that the whole is of equal quality with the samples, to be produced on or before the first Tuesday in January, 1805. . . 56. AscFRTA IN ING THE coxspox I.N.T PARTs of A RApr. E LAND. To the person who shall produce to the Society the most satisfactory set of experiments to ascertain the due proportion of the several component parts of rich arable land, in one or more counties in Great Britain,

by an accurate analysis of it; and who having made a like analysis of some poor arable land, shall, by comparing the component parts of each, and thereby ascertaining the deficiencies of the poor soil, in prove a quantity of it, not less than one acre, by the addition of such parts as the former experiments shall have discovered to be wanting therein, and therefore probably the cause of its sterility; the gold medal, or forty guineas. It is required, that the inanurings, ploughings, and crops, of the improved land, be the same after the improvement as before; and that a minute account of the produce in each state, of the weather, and of the various influencing circumstances, together with the method made use of in analysing the soils, be produced, with proper certificates and the chemical results of the analysis, which are to remain the property of the Society, on or before the last Tuesday in February, 1805. It is expected that a quantity, not less than six pounds, of the rich, of the poor, and of the improved soils, be produced with the cert:cates. , * 57. GAINING LAND From the SFA. To the person who shall produce to the Society an account, verified by actual experiment, of his haying gained the greatest quantity of land from the sea, not less than fifty acres, on the coast of Great Britain or Ireland; the gold medal. Certificates of the quantity of land, and that the experiments were begun after the 1st of January, 1798, to be produced , to the Society on or before the last Tuesday in October, 1804. 58. The same premium is extended one year farther. Certificates to be produced on or before the last Tuesday in October, 1805. 59. The same premium is extended one year farther. Certificates to be produced on or bey fore the last Tuesday in October, 1806. 60. IMP novi NG LAND LYING waste. For the most satisfactory account of the best method of improving any of the following soils, being land lying waste or uncultivated, viz. ciay, gravel, sand, chalk, peat-earth and bog, verified by experiments on not less than fifty acres of land; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. 61. For the next greatest quantity, not less than thirty acres, the silver medal, or twenty guineas. It is required, that the land before such improvement be absolutely uncultivated, and in a great measure useless, and that, in its improved state, it be enclosed, cultivated, and divided into closes. Certificates of the number of acres, of the quality of the land so improved, with a full account of every operation and expense attending such improvement, the state it is in as to the proportion of grass to arable, and the average value thereof, to be produced on or before the first Tuesday in February 1805. 62. MANures. For the most satisfactory set of experiments, to ascertain the comparative

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advantages of the following manures, used as top-dressings on grass or corn land, viz. soot, coal-ashes, wood-ashes, lithe, gypsum, nightsoil, or any other fit article ; the gold medal, or the silver medal and ten guineas. . It is required that the above experiments be made between two or more of the above-mentioned manures, and that not less than two acres of land be dressed with each manure. count of the nature of the soil, quantity and expense of the manure and crops, with certificates, to be produced on or before the last Tuesday in February, 1805. 63. The same premium is extended one year farther. The accounts and certificates to be produced on or before the last Tuesday in February, 1806. 64. RAIs INo WATER for 'THE IRR rq ATION of LAND. To the person who shall discover to the Society the cheapest and most effectual method of raising water in quantities suffcient to be beneficially employed for the purpose of irrigating land, superior to and cheaper than any other method now in use; the gold medal, or fifty guineas. A model on a scale of one inch to a foot, with certificates that a machine at large, on the same construction, has been used, specifying the quantity of water delivered in gallons per hour, and the height to which it was raised, to be produced to the Society on or before the first of March, 1805. 65. The same premium is extended one year farther. Certificates to be produced on or before the first of March, 1806. 66. PARING Plough. To the person who shall invent and produce to the Society, a machine or plough for the purpose of paring land proparatory to burning, superior to any hitherto known, or in use for such purpose, and to be worked by not more than one man and two horses; the silver medal, or twenty guineas. The machine, and certificates that at least three acres have been pared by it in a proper manmer, to be produced to the Society on or before the first of January, 1805. 67. MACIIINE for DiBBLING W HEAT. To the person who shall invent a machine, superior to any hitherto known or in use, to answer the purpose of dibbling wheat, by which the holes for receiving the grain may be made at equal distances and proper depths; the silver medal and ten guineas. The machine, with certificates that at least three acres have been dibbled by it, to be produced to the Society on or before the second Tuesday in January, 1805. Simplicity and cheapness in the constructio will be considered as principal parts of its inerit. 68. MACHINF For REAPING or Mowry G Cors. For inventing a machine to answer the purpose of mowing or reaping wheat, rye, barley, oats, or beans, by which it may be done more expeditiously and cheaper than by any

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method now practised, provided it does not shed the corn or pulse more than the methods in common practice, and that it lays the straw in such a manner that it may be easily gathered up for binding; the gold medal, or thirty gui

neas. The machine, with certificates that at

least three acres have been cut by it, to be produced to the Society on or before the second Tuesday in December, 1804. Simplicity and cheapness in the construction will be considered as principal parts of its merit. . 69. Thir Ash ING MAchi NE. To the person who shall invent a machine by which corn of all sorts may be thrashed more expeditiously, effectually, and at a less expense, than by any method now in use ; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. The machine, or a model, with proper certificates that such a machine has been usefully #. that at least thirty quarters have been thrashed by it, and of the time employed in the operation, to be produced to the Society on or before the last Tuesday in February, 1805. 70. DEs.T.Roy ING THE GRUB of the Cockcha FER. To the person who shall discover to the Society an effectual method, verified by repeated and satisfactory trials, of destroying the grub of the cockchafer, or of preventing or checking the destructive effects which always attend corn, peas, beams, and turnips, when attacked by those insects; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts, with proper certificates, to be produced on or before the first Tuesday in January, 1805. 71. Destroy ING Wor Ms. To the person who shall discover to the Society an effectuat method, verified by repeated and satisfactory trials, of destroying worms, or of preventing the destructive effects they occasion on corn, beans, peas, or other pulse; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts, with proper certificates, to be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in January, 1805. 72. DEst Roy ING THE FLY o N. Hops. To the person who shall discover to the Society an easy and efficacious method of destroying the fly on hops, superior to any hitherto known or practised, on not less than four acres of hopground; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. Accounts and certificates to be delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 73. PRF v ENTING THE BLIGHT, or RAv.AGEs of INSEcts, on FRUIT-TRrrs AND Cu LINARY PLANTs. To the person who shall discover to the Society the most effectual method of preventing the blight, or ravages of insects on fruit-trees and culinary plants, superior to any hitherto known or practised, and verified by actual and comparative experiments; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts, with proper certificates, to be delivered to the Society on or before the sécond Tuesday in November, 1891.

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74. The same premium is extended one year farther. The accounts and ccrtificates to be delivered on or before the second Tuesday in November, 1805. 75. Restovi No the 11.1. Effrcts of Prio tirs, on IN sects. To the person who shall discover to the Society the most effectual method of removing the ill effects of blights, ur insects, on fruit-trees and culinary plants, superior to any hitherto known or practised, and verified by actual and comparative experitnents; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts and certificates to be delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 76. Cu RE of rury Rot IN SHEEr. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and most effectual method of curing the rot in sheep, verified by repeated and satisfactory experiments; the gold medal, or fitty guineas. It is expected that the candidates furnish accurate accounts of the symptoms and cure of the disease, together with the imputed cause thereof, and the actual or o: means of prevention, which, with proper cerwficates, must be delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 77. Cune of ris E Foot-Rot 1 N SHEF P. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and most effectual method of curing the foot-rot in sheep; the silver medal, or ten guineas. It is required, that the cure be ascertained by repeated and satisfactory experiments, and the method of performing it be verified by proper certificates delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 78. Parvex Trng tire 11t Effects of Frrr's on Shepp. To the person who shall discover to the Society the most effectual method of protecting sheep from being disturbed and injured by flies; the siiver medal, or ten guineas. It is required, that the method be ascertaincá by repeated experiments, and that a certificate of its efficacy be delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in December, 1804. 79. Protect is a Streep. To the person who, in the year 1803, shall protect the greatest number of sheep, not fewer than one hundred, by hovels, sheds, or any other means, and give the most satisfactory account, vCrified by experiment, of the advantages arising from the practice of protecting sheep from the

incleniency of the weather, by hovels, sheds,

or any other means; the silver medal, or twenty guineas. A particular account of the experiulents made, with the advantages arising therefrom, together with the expense, and certifiates of its utility, to be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in March, 1805. 80. The same premium is extended one

year farther.

Agriculture. [Juhe,

year farther. The aecounts and certificates to be delivered on or before the first Tuesday in March, 1806. N.B. It is required that the certificates shall specify the length of time the sheep were so protected, and the manner in which they were inaintained during that time ; together with the general method of managing thein. 81. IM proviso the Cox pition of the Labouri Ng Poon, by FRF criN G Cottages, AND Apportion ING LAND. To the person who, in the year 1803, shall erect the greatest number of cottages for the accommodation of the labouring poor, and apportion not less than two acres of land to each cottage; the gold medal. The accounts and certificates to be delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 82. The same premium is extended one year farther. The accounts and certificates to be delivered to the Society on or before the first

Tuesday in February, 1806. \

83. IMproving THE Cox DITIon of the Lahou RINo Poor by Arportion ING LAND to Cott AGEs. To the person who, in the year 1803, shall apportion to the greatest number of cottages already built upon his or her estate, any quantity of land, not less than two acres to each cottage, for the better accommodation of the respective inhabitants; the gold medal. The accounts of the number * of cottages, and of the quantity of land apportioned to each, to be delivered to the Society, with proper certificates, on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 84. The same premium is extended one The accounts and certificates No be delivered on or before the first Tuesday o, February, 1806. 85. Cu1.Tu RE of HEMP IN cFRTAIN PARTs of Scotland. The Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce, wishing to encourage the growth of hemp for the use of the navy in certain parts of Scotland, comprehending the whole county of Argyle, that part of Perthshire situated to the north of the river Tay, and west of the Military Road (see Ainslie's Map of Scotland) leading from Logierait to the county of Inverness, and such other parts of Scotland as lie north of Inverness-shire, offers to the person who shall sow with hemp, in drills at least eighteen inches asunder, the greatest quantity of land in the above-mentioned district, not less than fifty acres statute measure, in the year 1804, and shall at the proper season cause to be plucked the summer hemp (or male hemp bearing no seed), and continue the winter hemp (or female hemp bearing seed) on the ground until the seed is ripe, the gold medal, or fifty guineas. 86. To the person who shall sow with hemp, in drills at least eighteen inches asunder, the

next greatest quantity of land in the same above-mentioned district, not less than twentyfive acres, statute measure, in the year 1804, and shall at the proper season cause the same to be plucked as above mentioned; the silver medal, or twenty-five guineas. ... Certificates of the number of acres, of the distance of the drills, of the plucking of the hemp, with a general account of the soil, cultivation, and produce, to be delivered to the Society, along with fourteen pounds of the hemp, and two quarts of the seed, on or before the second Tuesday in January, 1805.

PREMIUMS FOR DISCOVERIES AND IMPROVEMENTS IN CHEMISTRY, DYING, AND MINERALOGY.

87. Preserving Seeds of VEGFTABLEs. For the best methods of preserving the seeds of plants in a state fit for vegetation a longer time than has hitherto been practised, such method being superior to any known to the public, and verified by sufficient trial, to be communicated to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in December, 1804; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. 88. PREve NTING THE DRY-Rot IN TIMser. To the person who shall discover to the Society the cause of the dry-rot in timber, and disclose a certain method of prevention superior to any hitherto known ; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts of the cause, and method of prevention, confirmed by repeated experiments, to be produced to the Society on or before the second Tuesday in December, 1804. 89. PREservix G s ALTED PRovisions froxi Becoys ING RANCID or Rusty. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best, cheapest, and most efficacious method of preserving salted provisions from growin rancid or rusty; the gold medal, or thirty guimeas. A full description of the method, with proper certificates that it has been found, on repeated trials, to answer the purpose intended, to be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 90. CLEARING Feathers froxi Tirfra ANIMAL Oil. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best and most expeditious method, superior to any hitherto practised, of clearing goose-feathers from their offensive animal oil, for the use of upholders, in making beds, cushions, &c. the silver medal, or twenty guineas. A quantity of such feathers unstripped and so cleared, not less than forty ‘pounds weight, with a full account of the process, to be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 91. Refixing WHALE on SEAL Ori. For disclosing to the Society an effectual method of purifying whale or seal oil from the glu

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tinous matter that incrusts the wicks of lamps and extinguishes the light, though fully sup

lied with oil; the gold medal, or fifty guineas.

t is required, that the whole of the process be fully and fairly disclosed, in order that satisfactory experiments may be made by the Society to determine the validity of the claim ;

and certificates that not less than twenty gallons

have been purified according to the process delivered in, together with two gallons of the oil, in its unpurified state, and two gallons so refined, be produced to the Society on or before the second Tuesday in February, 1805. 92. MANufacturiNG TAllow CANdles. To the person who shall discover to the Society a method of hardening or otherwise preparing tallow, so that candles may be made of it which will burn as clear and with as small a wick as wax candles, without running, and may be afforded at a less expense than any at present made with spermaceti; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. Certificates that 112lb. of such tallow have been made into candles, and 12lb. of the candles made thereof, to be produced to the Society on or before the second Tuesday in January, 1805. 93. CANDLEs from Resin or other Stopst ANces. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best method of making candles of resin, or any other substance, fit for common use, at a price much inferior to those made of tallow only; the gold medal, or thirty guineas. Six pounds at least of the candles so prepared, with an account of the process, to be delivered to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in December, 1804. 94. Method of separating Sugan in a solid ForM from TREAcle. To the person who shall discover to the Society the best method of separating sugar from treacle, in a solid formu, at such an expense as will render it advantageous to the public; the gold medal, or fifty guineas. A quantity of the sugar so prepared, in a solid form, not less than thirty pounds weight, with an account of the process, and certificates that not less than one hundred weight has been prepared, to be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in February, 1805. 95. PROOF-SPIRIT. To the distiller who, in the year 1804, shall make the greatest quantity, not less than one hundred gallons, of a clean Inarketable spirit, from articles not the food of man or cattle, equal in strength or quality to the proof-spirit now in use, and at a rate not higher than the spirit produced from corn or melasses; the gold medal, or one hundred guineas. Ten gallons of the spirit; together with proper certificates, and a full account of the expense and mode of making it, to be produced to the Society on or before the first Tuesday in January, 1805. 96. IN car Asix G STEAM. To the Person

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