Kerma and the Kingdom of Kush, 2500-1500 B.C.: the archaeological discovery of an ancient Nubian empire

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National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, 1997 - 126 pages
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This book chronicles one of the twentieth century's greatest discoveries in African archaeology. In 1913, in the northern Sudanese village of Kerma on the east bank of the Nile, G. A. Reisner identified the remains of an ancient city with colossal architecture & spectacular royal tombs. Misinterpreted as a far-flung Egyptian trading colony, Kerma mystified scholars for decades until new research & renewed excavations by C. Bonnet revealed it to be the capital of the early Nubian kingdom of Kush, mentioned intermittently in Egyptian texts. Dating from about 2,500 B.C. Kerma established control of the river & overland trade routes linking central Africa with Egypt. Ultimately threatening Egypt, it was overthrown by the pharaohs about 1500 B.C. Detailing its discovery, this fascinating book describes the city & its palaces, temples & tombs as known through excavations to 1995. Written to accompany an exhibition of Kerma's pottery, jewelry, & artifacts, this book includes a catalog of the exhibition & many photographs, in color & black & white, documenting the archaeological site & its art. To order, call (202) 786-2147.

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