Introduction to Organic Laboratory Techniques: A Small Scale Approach

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Cengage Learning, 2005 - 1028 pages
8 Reviews
In this laboratory textbook for students of organic chemistry, experiments are designed to utilize standard-scale ("macroscale") glassware and equipment but with smaller amounts of chemicals and reagents. The textbook features a large number of traditional organic reactions and syntheses, as well as the isolation of natural products and experiments with a biological or health science focus. The organization of the text is based on essays and topics of current interest. There are six introductory technique-based experiments and eleven project-based experiments. In addition, there is a section of green chemistry experiments. The book contains a comprehensive treatment of laboratory techniques, including small-scale and some microscale methods.
 

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tahnks for your availability this book, but I wash that I can doanload it, can you help me about more than usage it.
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Razón por la cual la acetilación protege a las aminas de ser oxidadas!

Contents

Welcome to Organic Chemistry
2
Essay
4
Experiment
8
Essay
14
Experiment
18
Experiment 50
19
Experiment
32
Essay
45
Handbooks and Catalogs
592
Appendices
597
Measurement of Volume and Weight
600
Heating and Cooling Methods
612
Reaction Methods
624
Filtration
645
The Melting Point
659
Solubility
669

Experiment
52
37PM Page xv
72
Experiment 19
125
Essay
150
Part Three
167
Ethyl S3Hydroxybutanoate
263
to Benzilic Acid
287
Optical Purity
315
Polyester Nylon and Polystyrene
404
429
461
Part Five
517
FriedelCrafts Acylation
530
The Analysis of Antihistamine Drugs by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry
537
Carbonation of an Unknown Aromatic Halide
539
The Aldehyde Enigma
542
A GuidedInquiry Experience
544
Michael and Aldol Condensation Reactions
547
The Use of NMR to Determine a Structure
551
An Oxidation Puzzle
553
Part Six The Techniques
557
Laboratory Safety
558
The Laboratory Notebook Calculations and Laboratory Records
575
Care and Cleaning
583
Purification of Solids
679
Extractions Separations and Drying Agents
698
The Boiling Point and Density
723
Simple Distillation
733
Fractional Distillation Azeotropes
744
Vacuum Distillation Manometers
764
Sublimation
779
Steam Distillation
786
Column Chromatography
794
ThinLayer Chromatography
819
HighPerformance Liquid Chromatography HPLC
832
Gas Chromatography
837
Polarimetry
857
Refractometry
867
Infrared Spectroscopy
873
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Proton NMR
909
Carbon13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
946
Mass Spectrometry
964
Guide to the Chemical Literature
984
Tables of Unknowns and Derivatives
1000
Procedures for Preparing Derivatives
1014
Index
1021
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Donald L. Pavia earned his BS degree in chemistry from Reed College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Yale University. In 1970, he joined the faculty at Western Washington University as Assistant Professor and now holds the rank of Professor Emeritus. He is the coauthor of two organic laboratory books that include techniques and experiments: INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES: A MICROSCALE APPROACH (Cengage Learning), and A SMALL SCALE APPROACH TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES (Cengage Learning), as well as MICROSCALE AND MACROSCALE TECHNIQUES IN THE ORGANIC LABORATORY (Cengage Learning), which highlights techniques to be used with a faculty member's own experiments. He is a co-author, with Gary M. Lampman, George S. Kriz and James R. Vyvyan of an organic spectroscopy book, INTRODUCTION TO SPECTROSCOPY (Cengage Learning). Professor Pavia's research interests center on the synthesis and reactions of valence tautomeric and photochromic compounds, especially pyrylium-3-oxide tautomers. Autoxidations are a special interest. His other interests include the use of computers in teaching organic chemistry, both for lecture presentation and for the simulation of laboratories. He is the author of several computer programs. One such program is SQUALOR (Simulated Qualitative Organic Analysis) for which he won the 1986 EDUCOM/NCRIPTAL award. The program is designed for teaching the methods for solving organic unknowns.

Gary M. Lampman earned his BS degree in chemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Washington. In 1964, he joined the faculty at Western Washington University as Assistant Professor, rising to Professor in 1973. He received the Outstanding Teaching Award for the College of Arts and Sciences in 1976. He now holds the title of Professor Emeritus. Teaching has always been an important part of his life. Contact with students invigorates him. He is the coauthor of two organic laboratory books that include techniques and experiments: INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES: A MICROSCALE APPROACH (Cengage Learning), and A SMALL SCALE ARPPROACH TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES (Cengage Learning), as well as MICROSCALE AND MACROSCALE TECHNIQUES IN THE ORGANIC LABORATORY (Cengage Learning), which highlights techniques to be used with a faculty member's own experiments. He is a co-author, with Donald L. Pavia, George S. Kriz, and James R. Vyvyan of an organic spectroscopy book, INTRODUCTION TO SPECTROSCOPY, Fourth Edition (Cengage Learning). Professor Lampman also is the author of the computer program for teaching organic nomenclature: ORGANIC NOMENCLATURE: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE IUPAC SYSTEM. His research interests center on synthetic methods involving the reaction of free radicals on unsaturated cobaloximes (vitamin B12 model compounds), synthesis of strained small ring compounds, and chemical education. He is the author of 18 papers in these areas. He is a member of the American Chemical Society (Organic and Chemical Education divisions), and the Washington College Chemistry Teachers Association.

George S. Kriz is Professor of Chemistry at Western Washington University. He earned his B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California, and his Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. In 1967 he joined the faculty at Western Washington University and recently served as department chair. He served as the General Chair of the 17th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education for 2001-2002. Professor Kriz was honored with the Peter J. Elich Excellence in Teaching Award (College of Arts and Sciences), Western Washington University, in 2000 and the Distinguised Service Award from the Division of Chemical Education, American Chemical Society (2010). He is the co-author with Donald Pavia, Gary Lampman, and Randall Engel of two organic laboratory books that include both techniques and experiments: INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES: A MICROSCALE APPROACH (Cengage Learning), and A SMALL SCALE APPROACH TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES (Cengage Learning). Their book, MICROSCALE AND MACROSCALE TECHNIQUES IN THE ORGANIC LABORATORY (Cengage Learning), includes techniques only, and can be used with a faculty member's own experiments. He is a co-author, with Donald Pavia, Gary Lampman, and James Vyvyan, of an organic spectroscopy book, INTRODUCTION TO SPECTROSCOPY (Cengage Learning). Professor Kriz's research interests include: developing new experiments for the organic chemistry laboratory; chemical education and the teaching of chemistry courses for general-understanding audiences; and determination of the structures of natural products using spectroscopic methods.

Randall G. Engel has taught chemistry for almost 35 years. He has co-authored with Donald Pavia, Gary Lampman, and George Kriz INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES: A MICROSCALE APPROACH (Cengage Learning), and A SMALL SCALE INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC LABORATORY TECHNIQUES (Cengage Learning). Their book, MICROSCALE AND MACROSCALE TECHNIQUES IN THE ORGANIC LABORATORY (Cengage Learning), includes techniques only, and can be used with a faculty member's own experiments. Engel received his B.A. degree in chemistry from Cornell College and his M.S. degree in chemistry from Western Washington University. He began his teaching career at Wenatchee Valley College in 1975 and continued at Green River Community College and Edmonds Community College. Presently he teaches organic chemistry on a part-time basis at North Seattle Community College.

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